Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

70 posts categorized "1,000 Days"

Watch “The Last Hunger Season” Online


The Last Hunger Season Film Series: Part 1, "Expanding Possibilities." Watch other videos in the series here.

Today’s celebration of World Food Day lifts up the role of smallholder farmers through the theme, “Family Farming: Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth.” There are plenty of these farmers to celebrate: 500 million smallholder farmers live and work in the developing world. Most of them are women.

Last year saw the publication of The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change, a book by Roger Thurow, senior fellow for global agriculture and food policy at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs and longtime friend of Bread for the World. Now there is a series of short documentary videos online that bring the book to life, telling the stories of smallholder farmers in Kenya.

Here’s a description of the story:

Africa’s small farmers, who comprise two-thirds of its population, toil in a time warp, living and working essentially as they did in the 1930s. Without mechanized equipment, fertilizer, or irrigation; using primitive storage facilities, roads, and markets; lacking capital, credit, and insurance; they harvest only one-quarter the yields of Western farmers, half of which spoil before getting to market. But in 2011 one group of farmers in Kenya came together to try to change their odds for success—and their families’ futures. Roger Thurow spent a year following their progress.

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers’ lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world’s growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO’s, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Watch The Last Hunger Season online. Learn more about Bread’s efforts to enact much-needed reforms to U.S. food aid. Then take action to help more smallholder farmers, like those shown in Kenya, and hungry people around the world as well. 

Celebrating 5th Birthdays and Beyond

DB at 6 cowboy shirt 1954 (3)
Bread for the World President David Beckmann, at approximately age 5. To see the complete #5thbday photo gallery, visit 5thbdayandbeyond.org. (Photo courtesy of David Beckmann)

By Beth Ann Saracco

If you are on Facebook, and follow Bread for the World President David Beckmann, you may have noticed he recently updated his profile picture to a photo of himself as a young boy. The change commemorates the 5th Birthday and Beyond celebration, which recognizes the significant progress that has been achieved in child survival over the past 25 years, and the many contributions the United States has made in reaching this milestone.

Thanks in large part to bipartisan support from members of Congress, current and past U.S. administrations, private-sector partners, nongovernmental organizations (including Bread for the World), and other multilateral organizations and donor nations, the number of deaths of children under five has dropped by half since 1990. In the past twelve years alone, 700,000 fewer children have died from pneumonia, 300,000 fewer children from malaria, and 100,000 fewer children from AIDS.

As we celebrate these significant gains, we also reflect on the role Bread for the World has played, throughout its own 40-year history, to significantly improve child survival. In the last 25 years alone, Bread for the World has helped craft and pass major legislation that has reduced child mortality, including a bill that established the international Child Survival Fund. Each year, this fund helps immunize more than 100 million children in the developing world; since its establishment, the number of children dying daily from malnutrition and preventable diseases has fallen by 50 percent.  

In 1999, Bread for the World led the creation of the Jubilee Campaign, which was part of a worldwide movement that successfully urged Congress to forgive the debts of some of the world’s poorest countries. As a result, relief has reduced the debts of 36 of the world’s poorest countries by 90 percent. Many of these countries have been able to reinvest and expand basic education and health services.

In the new millennium, Bread for the World and its partners successfully advocated for the establishment of the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), which provided a new, innovative way of administering U.S. foreign aid. Through its unique approach focused on good governance, accountability, and poverty reduction, MCC has supported nearly 40 countries with more than $8.5 billion in aid, ranging from food-security programs and health initiatives to water and sanitation projects.

Most recently, thanks in part to analysis from Bread for the World Institute, we are pushing to improve the nutritional quality of U.S. food aid. In addition, through the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Civil Society Network, which supports civil society alliances at the country level, we are learning about the opportunities and challenges of scaling up nutrition in some of the countries most affected by malnutrition. This is helping inform our advocacy and our push for greater investments in maternal and child nutrition programs.

Working with a number of U.S. civil society partners, our advocacy efforts helped encourage and shape the U.S. Agency for International Development’s new nutrition strategy, which will better integrate and coordinate nutrition and nutrition-related programs across U.S. development assistance programs. Since we know the many links that exist between child survival and the right nutrition and care during the 1,000 days between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s second birthday, these efforts will translate into even more mothers and children living longer, healthier, more productive lives.

Proudly, Bread for the World joins with other partners in recognizing the 5th Birthday and Beyond celebration, and extends particular gratitude to Congress and the administration for their continued support of vital programs that promote child survival and wellbeing. Together, we are working to ensure that all children not only survive to their fifth birthdays, but thrive well beyond them.

Beth Ann Saracco is an international policy analyst at Bread for the World.

Bread Helps Win Important Nutrition Victories

Lead story home
Dabora Nyibol prepares sorghum for her family at her home in South Sudan. A new nutrition strategy for the U.S. Agency for International Development will help ensure that people like Nyibol in poor countries will receive better nutrition from the assistance they receive from U.S. food-aid programs. (Stephen H. Padre)

May was a good month for nutrition.

At the Chicago Council Global Food Security 2014 event May 22 in Washington, D.C., National Security Advisor Susan Rice delivered on a promise by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to launch the agency's first-ever global nutrition strategy. The release of the strategy came just one year after being announced at an event cohosted by Bread for the World and Concern Worldwide.

Bread has been an active participant in the development of the strategy, along with other institutions that share a concern over nutrition, including advocacy and operational partners of USAID.

Improving maternal and child nutrition has been a major part of Bread's non-legislative advocacy efforts for the past three years. The USAID strategy comes after Bread’s successful efforts to clarify exactly where nutrition programs are funded within the federal budget, to persuade the administration to identify a high-level spokesperson for nutrition in the U.S. government (USAID administrator Raj Shah was named), and to help win needed reforms in U.S. food aid policies and programs. Also, the 2014 farm bill authorized changes that will increase the efficiency of food-aid programs and delivery, allow greater flexibility to purchase food for distribution closer to where it is needed, and provide additional options for using new specialized food products that have been fortified with vitamins and minerals.

"The fact that USAID has developed an agency-wide nutrition strategy is another sign of U.S. leadership in efforts to scale up maternal and child nutrition globally," said Asma Lateef, director of Bread for the World Institute. “It reflects a strong commitment to augment the effectiveness of its programs, especially those in the Feed the Future Initiative, and to hold itself accountable to improving nutrition, particularly in the critical 1,000-day window of opportunity between pregnancy and age 2."

Feed the Future is the U.S. government’s global hunger and food-security initiative that connects federal government agencies and departments that have hunger-related programs and the 19 partner countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America and the Caribbean that are in the initiative.

According to the strategy, undernutrition contributed to 3.1 million (45 percent of all) preventable child deaths in 2011. That same year, stunting impacted more than 165 million people worldwide—including 52 million children under five. The USAID nutrition strategy recognizes the essential role that nutrition plays in human development and the devastating personal, social, and economic impacts of chronic malnutrition on an individual, a community, and a country.

The strategy will support commitments the United States made as part of the Global Nutrition for Growth Compact agreed at last year’s Nutrition for Growth Summit, including reaching 500 million pregnant women and children under two by 2020; averting 20 million additional cases of stunting by 2020 (a World Health Assembly milestone); and preventing 1.7 million deaths by 2020 through efforts to reduce stunting, increase breastfeeding, improve zinc supplementation, and boost coverage of treatment of severe acute malnutrition.

"In the year since announcing the strategy, USAID has engaged a broad set of stakeholders, resulting in a stronger finished product and more effective, efficient implementation," added Lateef. "This has also laid the groundwork for the forthcoming 'whole-of-government' plan from the Obama administration. We look forward to continued cross-agency coordination to help improve nutritional outcomes for women and children around the world."

[This article originally appeared in the June edition of Bread for the World's e-newsletter.]

Long-term Unemployed Tell House to Do the Right Thing

Screen Shot 2014-05-07 at 9.32.14 AM
Helen Laurusavage and six other unemployed workers told their stories on the Capitol steps on May 6, 2014, in Washington, D.C. (Screenshot, CSPAN video)

They did everything right. They played by the rules. 

Kevin McCarthy, a 38-year-old father of two, got his first job, delivering newspapers, at the age of 12. After six years in the National Guard, the Boonsboro, Md., resident found steady employment in construction and always had good work evaluations. 

Helene Laurusavage, 52, of Sanatoga, Penn., has a degree in physics and is proud of having served in the Air Force. She also enjoyed a successful career as environmental health and safety officer. 

Then, it all fell apart. In shock, both McCarthy and Laurusavage watched their jobs vanish and their dreams crumble. Each received unemployment for the first time in their adult lives. Each thought finding a job would be easy. Now, they are part of the growing segment of the population referred to as the "long-term unemployed," and they are asking Congress for help. “What we have worked so hard for –our American dream–has turned into a nightmare,” Laurusavage said to those gathered for a briefing on the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday, May 6.

Laurusavage and six others came to tell lawmakers their stories and urge the House to reinstate long-term unemployment insurance (also called emergency unemployment compensation, or EUC), which expired in December. In April, the Senate passed a bipartisan bill for a short-term extension, but House Speaker John Boehner has showed no indication he plans to bring it to the floor for a vote. Each week that passes with no extension, another 72, 000 unemployed Americans lose a vital lifeline of support as they look for work.

Their stories, which are hard to hear, leave one with a sense that nothing is safe.  The old American narrative that promises financial security for hard work is being rewritten. By the end of 2014, the number of long-term unemployed could reach as high as 4.9 million. Unemployment insurance helps job seekers make ends meet as they look for work. But even many of those aggressively seeking employment are not finding work in a labor market still rebounding from the effects of the recession.

Despite a successful history of employment, Laurusavage has applied for 229 jobs and has had 26 interviews, but no offers. Instead, she and her husband have depleted their savings. “Without a renewal of federal unemployment aid, or a job, by the end of May we are done," she said Tuesday. "We’ll have nothing to make our mortgage and we will lose our home.”

McCarthy talked about the emotional toll it takes on a family as he stood at the podium.  Even with his wife working, they are barely making it. He doesn’t know how to explain to his children why he can’t find work.  “There is no explanation except that we are being let down by the people we elected into office," he said. "You have no idea how soul-crushing it is to listen to your daughter tell you how she is a burden."

Never before in the history of EUC has a Congress failed to extend the emergency aid when unemployment is so high.

McCarthy, Laurusavage, and millions like them did everything right—and now Congress should.

*

House Republicans are not feeling pressure to pass this bill. We must change that. Please call (800-826-3688) or email your representative today and urge him or her to vote to extend unemployment insurance.

Roger Thurow and the Global Cost of Malnutrition

School girl
A student who benefits from a USAID funded feeding program in Guatemala. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

While the suffering of children who do not receive adequate nutrition during the first 1000 days of their lives cannot be overstated, malnutrition is a problem that can also impact a nation’s economic productivity and even our global economy. One out of four children under the age of five is stunted – that’s a quarter of our global population. The good news is we have solutions that work, but the question remains: will we implement policies and fund programs that we know can make a difference?

This is the focus of a recent article in The Atlantic by Roger Thurow, author of the new book The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change, and senior fellow for global agriculture and food policy at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

In a moving excerpt from the article 1,000 Days: The Period That Decides the Health and Wealth of the World, Thurow writes:

“For me, the human face of these numbers is a boy I first met during the Ethiopian famine of 2003, when international food aid was keeping 14 million people alive. Hagirso was five years old and weighed just 27 pounds when his father, Tesfaye Ketema, carried him into an emergency feeding tent. Tesfaye explained that his son, who was sickly and weak and stunted, had been malnourished since birth and was the most vulnerable in the family when the famine hit. Hagirso miraculously survived, but his early malnourishment and the subsequent famine exacted a tremendous toll. When I visited him 10 years later, in April 2013, Hagirso was 15 and barely four feet tall. Tesfaye said his son was often sick and wasn’t strong enough to do much work on the small family farm. Hagirso was in school, but only in the first grade. The day I visited, he and his much-younger classmates were studying the alphabet and pronouncing vowel-consonant combinations: ba, be, bi, bo, bu. There, in that classroom, was confirmation of all the statistics on the cost of malnutrition and stunting: lost education, lost work, lost wages, lost opportunity.”

Calculate the cost of malnutrition globally and the bill is estimated to run about $1.4 – 2.1 trillion a year. Targeting nutrition and nutrition education to mothers and infants in the first 1000 days is a cost-effective solution with proven results.

U.S. food aid — the focus of Bread for the World's 2014 Offering of Letters — is one vehicle that allows the United States to play its part in decreasing global malnutrition.  With smart policy changes that address a modern understanding of the long-term effects of hunger, we can provide food that is more nutritious, especially to women and children in the critical 1,000-day window between pregnancy and a child’s second birthday.

The future is at stake – malnutrition strips opportunity from the Hagirsos of the world. What he might have been able to contribute to his family, his village, his country, and the world has been compromised because of hunger.  We cannot change what happened to Hagirso, but we can make a difference for the millions of other children around the world .

*

After learning more about what's at stake, take action by writing to your members of Congress and urging them to pass much-needed reform to our food-aid programs. Recent food-aid improvements are also in danger of being reversed. Learn more about how you can take urgent action here.

Today: Congressional Hearing on 1,000 Days


Children at the Nutrition Rehabilitation Home in Dhangadhi, Nepal, receive their 4 a.m. milk feeding on Monday, April 30, 2102. This Nutrition Rehabilitation Home in Dhangadhi, Nepal, in the western part of the country, is run by RUWDUC (Rural Women's Development Unity Corporation), a Nepali NGO. The Dhangadhi facility serves up to 10 malnourished children at a time for up to 60 days; mothers stay with their child. All services are free. (Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World)

By Beth Ann Saracco

Thanks to a growing body of research, and the advocacy efforts of Bread for the World members and others throughout the world, Congress is beginning to recognize the importance of global maternal and child nutrition. Our legislators are paying particular attention to nutrition during the critical 1,000-day window from the start of a woman’s pregnancy through her child’s second birthday.

Last year, funding for global nutrition efforts were increased to $115 million, up from the previous year’s funding level of $95 million. That’s nearly a 22 percent increase in funding. Congress is starting to get it. And for good reason— every $1 invested in nutrition generates as much as $138 in better health and increased productivity.

And today, in the House of Representatives, the Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations is holding a hearing, “The First One Thousand Days: Development Aid Programs to Bolster Health and Nutrition.” The subcommittee’s chairman, Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ-4),  and ranking member, Karen Bass (D-CA-37), are holding this hearing to learn more about the health and nutritional needs of women and children during the 1,000-day period. The hearing will also address the role of faith-based organizations in partnering with governments and other non-governmental organizations to promote the 1,000 Days movement, and adequate maternal and child nutrition.

Be sure to tune into the hearing at 3 p.m. ET,  on Tuesday, March25,  to hear testimony from witnesses who have seen firsthand the importance of maternal and child health and nutrition during the first 1,000 Days. Tweet at Rep. Chris Smith (@RepChrisSmith) and Ranking Member Bass (@RepKarenBass), and thank them for their interest in this important issue and for holding this hearing. 

To learn more about the growing 1,000 Days movement, and to become part of the momentum, download Bread for the World's 1,000 Days toolkit. You can also visit Bread for the World’s 1,000 Days Movement page and “like” the Women of Faith for the 1,000 Days Movement Facebook page to receive the latest updates. 

Beth Ann Saracco is an international policy analyst at Bread for the World.

Tell Congress to Support a Global Nutrition Strategy

Pisano program
Paisano
is a USAID program implemented in Guatemala that aims to address child malnutrition and is highlighted in Bread for the World's 2014 Offering of Letters, "Reforming Food Aid." (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Eric Mitchell

Thanks to Bread for the World members, Congress is beginning to recognize the importance of global maternal and child nutrition, particularly in the critical 1,000-day window from pregnancy to age 2 of a child's life.

Last year, funding for global nutrition efforts was increased to $115 million compared to the previous year’s funding of $95 million. That’s nearly a 22 percent increase in funding. Congress is starting to get it. And for good reason, because every $1 invested in nutrition generates as much as $138 in better health and increased productivity.

Last year, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) announced that it would take the lead in developing a comprehensive nutrition strategy that would serve as the basis for a more robust global nutrition approach for the U.S. government as a whole. Through better coordination of nutrition programs and closer evaluation of the effectiveness of these programs, we can help to end hunger by ensuring that more vulnerable women and children throughout the world are living healthy, productive, and hope-filled lives. USAID is set to release this strategy next month, but before it's unveiled, we need more members of Congress to express their support for this nutrition strategy.

Right now, Reps. Adam Smith (D-9WA) and Ander Crenshaw (R-4FL) are circulating a letter to President Obama expressing support for a nutrition strategy.

Call toll-free: 800-826-3688 or email your representative, and ask him or her to sign the Smith-Crenshaw letter in support of a USAID’s nutrition strategy!

Together, we are making a difference on Capitol Hill and with the administration. Let’s continue to advance the importance of the 1,000 Days movement for vulnerable women and children throughout the world. Our nutritional investments now in young children can have payoffs for years to come.

Eric Mitchell is the director of government relations at Bread for the World.

Addressing Global Maternal and Child Nutrition


A mother and child share a meal in rural Guatemala. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Amanda Bornfree

Where there is hunger and poverty, mothers and children are almost always disproportionately affected. The 1,000 days from pregnancy through a child’s second birthday are the most crucial for a child’s development, but many women around the world don’t have access to proper nutrition for themselves or their children. The United States plays a crucial role in the fight to eradicate maternal and child malnutrition, and our nation's continued commitment is key to ending this global scourge.

In June, Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Fla.) and Debbie Wasserman Shultz (D-Fla.) introduced House Resolution 254, which recognizes the importance of U.S. leadership in addressing global maternal and child nutrition. Though the resolution is still active, it’s in need of more support. So far, there are 53 co-sponsors, but only six are Republicans. In order for this resolution to pass, we must make sure the resolution remains bipartisan. This means, we need YOUR help!

We’d like to encourage you—especially if you live in a Republican district—to reach out to your representative and ask her or him to co-sponsor H. Res. 254. This resolution will bolster and strengthen our government's efforts to make sure children everywhere have the nutrition they need to grow and thrive. Please use letters and/or phone calls to reach out to your representatives and ask them to support this important resolution. Share the news with your family and friends that live in Republican districts, too— they may also want to urge their representative to support the fight against global maternal and child malnutrition. Submitting letters to the editor of your local paper will also help get the word out to your community.

As always, we encourage you to check out the resources we have on our webpage that may assist you during this process. And please contact Rev. Nancy Neal, Bread's associate for denominational women's organization relations, Beth Ann Saracco, Bread international policy analyst, or your regional Bread organizer for additional information or assistance. We’d also like to know what you hear back from your representatives —please keep us posted!

Thank you for being a supporter of the 1,000 Days movement!

Amanda Bornfree is a consultant in the church relations department at Bread for the World.

WIC: Strengthening Families for 40 years!


To learn more about WIC , and to watch more informative videos, visit the WIC at 40 website.

Parenthood is wonderful and rewarding, but raising thriving, healthy kids is a big job. Since 1974, WIC has been vital in helping parents give their children a healthy start—this year marks the program's 40th year of strengthening families.

When Chicago resident and WIC advocate Amanda Bornfree lost her health insurance shortly after learning that she was expecting her first child, WIC was a lifeline for her and her family. Her story about how WIC helped her included in the new Circle of Protection "Facts and Faces" project. She says that the program fed her determination to succeed: 

When I looked around the WIC clinic, I saw that I was among a community of women that cared for each other. Different generations, complexions, languages, and experiences—all of us present to keep ourselves and our families healthy. We all believed in that, whether we were there to help or to receive help. We all believed that everyone has the right to live a healthy life, and that a healthy life begins during the period from the start of a woman’s pregnancy until her child’s second birthday—the crucial 1,000 days.

WIC, which is funded through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, helped nearly 9 million moms and kids (under age 5) get the nutrition they needed last year. But WIC does more than just provide food vouchers for low-income mothers and their children—the program also provides information on healthy eating, breastfeeding support, and referrals to health care. Families with incomes up to 185 percent of the federal poverty level ($40,409 for a family of four in 2010) can participate.

Bread for the World has campaigned to fully fund and support WIC because we know WIC is a critical tool in the mission to end hunger. Sequestration, the automatic cuts enacted as part of the Budget Control Act of 2011, will continue to erode the effectiveness of the program. The recently-passed 2014 appropriations bill mitigates some of those cuts, and includes $6.7 billion for WIC, which will cover current and projected needs for low-income mothers and children. Bread for the World will monitor future spending bills, and continue to advocate for WIC to receive adequate funding—while pushing Congress to replace sequestration with a balanced approach.

The program's 40th anniversary offers an opportunity to celebrate the dedication of WIC staff, the health of thriving WIC children and their families, and also the efforts of faithful advocates who continue to urge Congress to fully fund this investment in the future of our nation.

 

Protecting Foreign Assistance

During the upheavals over the budget in recent years, Bread for the World and our partners have been successful in maintaining funding for U.S. programs that help hungry and poor people around the world. We have driven a major U.S. initiative focused specifically on hunger, and we have helped to improve the quality of U.S. foreign assistance. Bread will continue to advocate for the protection of programs that provide lifesaving food aid, help thousands of farmers learn increase their yields and incomes, and educate children.

Aid Remains Strong in Tough Budget Climate

During the George W. Bush and early Obama years, U.S. funding for programs that help reduce poverty around the world tripled to $22 billion annually, in part because of the persistent advocacy of Bread for the World members.

This poverty-focused development assistance (PFDA), which accounts for less than one percent of the federal budget, along with increased aid from industrialized nations, has supported rapid economic progress in poor countries.

Despite huge budget pressures, we have managed to protect foreign assistance programs that help poor people.

There was a tragic surge in hunger in 2008, driven by the global financial crisis and soaring prices for rice, wheat, and corn. The incoming Obama administration responded, leading the world in increasing investment in agriculture and nutrition in the most-affected countries. Bread for the World and our members rallied around this initiative, called Feed the Future.

In 2011, more than 4.3 million farmers around the world benefitted from U.S. agricultural development assistance through projects like Feed the Future.

In 2008, major research findings gave the world new knowledge about how to tackle the scourge of child malnutrition. One conclusion was that nutrition assistance should target the 1,000 days from the start of a woman’s pregnancy through her child’s second birthday. Bread for the World Institute played a leadership role in urging U.S. and international officials to incorporate this new knowledge into the global food security program. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton launched the 1,000 Days initiative, and Bread for the World organized a network of U.S. women across Christian denominations — Women of Faith for the 1,000 Days Movement — to support this effort.

Bread for the World Institute convened international meetings on nutrition during Bread’s 2011 and 2013 National Gatherings. At this year's meeting, Dr. Rajiv Shah, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), told Bread advocates, "You form one of the greatest movements alive today—the fight to make hunger, malnutrition, and extreme poverty permanently a thing of the past."

This year, world leaders committed $4.15 billion over three years to scale up direct nutrition interventions and an additional $19 billion for nutrition-sensitive programs in agriculture and other sectors. Shah is leading a review of nutrition-related programs in the U.S. government in order to use available dollars most effectively.

The number of hungry people in the world has dropped below the pre-2008 level and is continuing to decline—partly because of U.S. leadership in promoting agriculture and nutrition among the poorest countries of the world.

When President Bush decided to increase assistance to poor countries, he set up new institutions within the U.S. governmen t— the Millennium Challenge Corporation and the President’s Emergency Fund for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Bread for the World helped secure congressional support, and both of these institutions have been effective.

Still, the entire U.S. foreign assistance system was badly in need of reform. In response to this, Bread helped set up the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN), a foreign assistance reform coalition that has been supported by both the Hewlett and Gates foundations.

In 2009, Bread for the World's Offering of Letters campaign was a push for foreign assistance reform. When the legislation Bread supported passed the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the Obama administration announced it would work on the issue.

The administration has since improved coordination among the government agencies that work in developing countries, and President Obama issued a directive that established international development policies and priorities for the entire government.

USAID has set up an excellent system of evaluation, and information on the aid projects of U.S. agencies is now available to the public at www.foreignassistance.gov.

"Those of us who push for more dollars for programs of assistance need to work just as hard to make sure those dollars are used well," says Bread for the World President David Beckmann. "Bread for the World's members have been willing to study up on these issues and push for both funding and effectiveness."

Stay Connected

Bread for the World