Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

611 posts categorized "Advocacy"

Rev. David Beckmann Challenges You to #ShareYourPlate

By Bread Staff

Yes, here’s proof that Rev. David Beckmann can cook – but with the help of two young anti-hunger activists, Elizabeth Quill and Margaret Hudak.

Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, answered a #ShareYourPlate challenge: a Catholic Charities, USA social media campaign to raise awareness about the pervasiveness of hunger. By sharing a cooking video, the #ShareYourPlate campaign reminds us that food is something we all share.

While preparing a taco salad, Quill and Hudak emphasized the need to advocate for programs that help people put food on their table. The girls told Beckmann of a meeting they had with their Virginia members of Congress in which they asked lawmakers to support funding for the SNAP program (formerly food stamps).

Their lobby visit illustrates how sharing a story with your member of Congress is a powerful advocacy tool. It can also help lawmakers understand the reality of hunger in states and districts far removed from their Washington, D.C. offices.

Hudak related her own experience of seeing hunger in the lunchroom at school.  She noticed some students restricted their purchases to only cereal and milk and saw others go without food entirely. “A kid can’t function through the day on milk and cereal,” she said.

Last December, Catholic Charities USA, Bread for the World, and others answered Pope Francis and Caritas Internationalis’ call for a global wave of prayer to end hunger as part of the One Family #FoodForAll campaign.

Rev. Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA, created his own cooking video as a way to build on the #FoodForAll campaign. He then sent out a challenge to others to do the same before November 27 - including a special invitation to Beckmann.

Beckmann now challenges travel writer Rick Steves, community food systems expert Sharon Thornberry – and you.  Create a cooking video or post a photo at #ShareYourPlate and on your Twitter or Facebook page. Share a virtual meal and help bring awareness to the problem of hunger.

Folllow the challengers on Twitter: @DavidBeckmann, @Fr_Larry_Snyder, @RickSteves, and  @OFB_SharonT and tag @bread4theworld with your cooking video.

Tweet Congress: #FeedtheFuture

5188115264_6d60870c5f_b
Kenyan Farmer. (ACDI/VOCA)

By Robin Stephenson

Since 2010, Feed the Future programs have helped millions of farmers increase the amount of food they can grow and the the ability to feed their families. It is time to codify the program into law. With enough pressure from constituents, bills introduced in the House and Senate last month (H.R. 5656/S. 2909) could be voted on and passed during the lame-duck session. These bills would permanently authorize this comprehensive approach to global food security, ensuring the initiative continues beyond the current administration.

Learn more: Bread’s Bill Analysis: Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Both bills have been introduced into committee. For H.R. 5656 and S. 2909 to move forward, the committee leadership must schedule a mark-up. Committee members then vote on the marked-up version, and if passed, the bill moves out of committee and is eligible for a floor vote.  Leadership then determines if there is sufficient momentum to pass the bill and if so, will put the bill up for a vote from the full chamber. 

Cosponsorship implies a commitment to vote in support of a bill and helps build the momentum for a floor vote.  Help us build momentum.  Look for your state, and if you have a member of Congress on one of the committees considering the Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014, click on his/her name to automatically load a tweet. If you do not have a Twitter account, email or call your representative at (800) 826-3688 and ask him/her to cosponsor H.R. 5656.  And email or call your senators, and ask them to cosponsor S. 2909. 

Senate Foreign Affairs: 113th Congress Committee Members
*members in bold have cosponsored S. 2909: Global Food Security Act of 2014

State

Majority Member

State

Minority member

New Jersey

Chairman, Robert Menendez

Tennessee

Bob Corker, Ranking Member

California

Barbara Boxer

Idaho

James Risch

Maryland

Benjamin Cardin

Florida

Marco Rubio

New Hampshire

Jeanne Shaheen

Wisconsin

Ron Johnson

Delaware

Christopher Coons        

Arizona

Jeff Flake

Illinois

Richard Durbin

Arizona

John McCain

New Mexico

Tom Udall

Wyoming

John Barrasso

Connecticut

Chris Murphy

Kentucky

Rand Paul

Virginia

Tim Kaine

 

 

Massachusetts

Edward Markey

 

 

House Committee on Foreign Affairs:  113th Congress Committee Members
*members in bold have cosponsored H.R. 5656: Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014.

State

Majority Member

State

Minority Member

California

Chairman, Edward Royce

New York

Eliot Engel, Ranking Member

New Jersey

Christopher Smith

America Samoa

Eni Faleomavaega

Florida

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

California

Brad Sherman

California

Dana Rohrabacher

New York

Gregory Meeks

Ohio

Steve Chabot

New Jersey

Albio Sires

South Carolina

Joe Wilson

Virginia

Gerald Connolly

Texas

Michael McCaul

Florida

Theodore Deutch

Texas

Ted Poe

New York

Brian Higgins

Arizona

Matt Salmon

California

Karen Bass

Pennsylvania

Tom Marino

Massachusetts

William Keating

South Carolina

Jeff Duncan

Rhode Island

David Cicilline

Illinois

Adam Kinzinger

Florida

Alan Grayson

Alabama

Mo Brooks

California

Juan Vargas

Arkansas

Tom Cotton

Illinois

Bradley Schneider

California

Paul Cook

Massachusetts

Joseph Kennedy III

North Carolina

George Holding

California

Ami Bera

Texas

Randy Weber Sr.

California

Alan S. Lowenthal

Pennsylvania

Scott Perry

New York

Grace Meng

Texas

Steve Stockman

Florida

Lois Frankel

Florida

Ron DeSantis

Hawaii

Tulsi Gabbard

Georgia

Doug Collins

Texas

Joaquin Castro

North Carolina

Mark Meadows

 

 

Florida

Ted Yoho

 

 

Wisconsin

Sean Duffy

 

 

Florid

Curt Clawson

 

 

 Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

 

 

Hunger Justice Leader Wins Brave Preacher Award

HJL at mic
Rev. Annie Edison-Albright went through Bread’s Hunger Justice Leader training in 2008. She subsequently became a Lutheran pastor in Wisconsin and has received an award for a sermon she preached on poverty.  (Jay Mallin)

By Stephen Padre

What happens after Bread for the World Hunger Justice Leaders are trained and return to their work? If you preach for your profession, like Rev. Annie Edison-Albright, pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, Stevens Point, Wisc., you might talk about hunger and poverty in your sermons and even be recognized for the risks it sometimes involves.

Edison-Albright is the 2014 recipient of The Beatitudes Society's Brave Preacher Award. The organization announced her as the winner of its award on Nov. 3 for a sermon she preached earlier this year. The theme of this year’s award was the violence of poverty and income inequality in the United States. Criteria for the award include the relationship of current context to biblical text, courageous proclamation, and attention to the preacher's craft.  According to its website, the mission of The Beatitudes Society is to identify and equip “emerging leaders to grow Progressive Christian faith communities for the sake of justice and the common good.”

Edison-Albright  describes her congregation, its response to her preaching, and her own anxiety about delivering her sermon in a news release from the organization:

"Redeemer Lutheran Church is an ELCA [Evangelical Lutheran Church in America] congregation where 50-90 people worship at one service every Sunday, located in Central Wisconsin in a small, predominantly Roman Catholic, college town. The congregation is almost entirely white, with significant diversity in age, socioeconomic status, political views, and religious background.

"I felt called to preach about the extreme prejudice against people living in poverty, particularly attacks aimed at fast food workers striking for an increased minimum wage. I struggled with how to call out this injustice without singling out a few members of my congregation and letting the rest off the hook; the terrible Facebook memes I've seen are a symptom of a much larger, systemic sin that we all participate in. My goal was to convey that the people living in poverty whom we reject and dehumanize are incarnations of Jesus Christ. I worry that I didn't focus clearly enough on the systemic nature of the oppression faced by people living in poverty. I also don't like that it's clearly an example of a privileged pastor talking to (mostly) privileged people about (largely absent) people in poverty; I struggle with speaking honestly about the privilege in my context without creating an us/them dichotomy.

"My congregation is used to me preaching on topics in the news, so this sermon wasn't out of the ordinary in that way, but I found it challenging to prepare and nerve-wracking to deliver…A couple people have seen the sermon as an invitation into deeper conversation with me about poverty and politics, and I'm deeply grateful for that."

As for the $500 prize that comes with the award, Edison-Albright says, “My plan is to give $250 to Bread for the World, which invested in me and trained me as a Hunger Justice Leader back in 2008, and taught me so much of what I know about changing systems of injustice through advocacy.” She said she plans to give the other half to the Portage County Mobile Pantry, which delivers food to hungry people in the rural areas surrounding Stevens Point. “The Pantry just recently moved into their new home in my congregation's church building. I think this is a very Lutheran, very both/and approach: we need both charitable assistance and systemic change until hunger is eliminated completely."

Stephen Padre is the managing editor at Bread for the World.

Bread Rising in New Mexico: Celebrating the Past, Looking to the Future

NM 2
(Left to Right) Debbie Steffen, Joan Brown, Anne Hanke, Terese Bridges , Rev. Steve Miller,  Mark Peceny, Erik Medina, and Bill Miller (photo courtesy of Carlos Navarro).

I do not understand the mystery of grace -- only that it meets us where we are and does not leave us where it found us. -Anne Lamott


By Carlos Navarro

How did we get here? What did we accomplish? Where are we going? Those central questions were part of our simple but very meaningful celebration of prayer, reflection, and song on Saturday, October 25, which we called Bread Rising in New Mexico. Several dozen people joined in the celebration at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church that afternoon.

We came together to observe Bread for the World's 40th birthday. More importantly, we put together a celebration that allowed us to stop and think of how that long history of Bread applied to us here in New Mexico. Just as all politics is local, all grassroots advocacy is rooted in local activity.

We asked St. Andrew to host the event because this congregation has been a part of Bread for the World's history in Albuquerque from almost the very beginning. (We could have also held our celebration at St. Paul Lutheran Church, with whom we also have a long relationship).

With a slide show we celebrated the decision of Jim Brown, a member of the Christian Brothers, to take on the role of  volunteer state coordinator in 1984. We rejoiced as we remembered how a group of Bread members, including Lutheran Campus Pastor Howard Corry, decided to create a local group in 1989 and then promote Offerings of Letters among churches in Albuquerque. Then we lifted up the dozens of churches that stepped up over the years to hold  letter-writing Sundays (and sometimes Saturdays and weeknights) in New Mexico, including Smith Memorial Presbyterian Church in the tiny community of Truchas, Peace Lutheran Church in Las Cruces, Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in downtown Albuquerque, St. John's United Methodist Church in Santa Fe, and many, many others. Here is a video of my introduction to the slide show.

Celebrating People

Our advocacy over the years went beyond the pen and paper (and more recently the computer). We viewed pictures of Bread members from New Mexico who took our message directly to members of Congress and of candidates with direct visits in Albuquerque and Washington. We also used the occasion to recognize one of our own members of Congress, who has been an "Outstanding Anti-Hunger Adovcate for New Mexico."

Our slide show also celebrated dozens of individuals who have long been the core of Bread New Mexico over the past 30 years, including those who were involved in the 1990s, the 2000s, those who are part of our current leadership team, and the local members who have become involved more recently. And how can we forget our regional organizers?  Emily Abbott, Zelinda Welch, Matt Newell-Ching, Holly Hight, and Robin Stephenson. We also expressed gratitude for the partnerships that we forged with the Lutheran Advocacy Ministry, The New Mexico Conference of Churches, New Mexico Oxfam Action Corps, and the CARE Action Network.

Our walk down memory lane also included scenes of those times when we came together for worship in ecumenical services, Circle of Protection prayers and songs, and to heed the call from Pope Francis to pray for an end to hunger. Because we come from diverse Christian faith traditions, our ecumenical choir was an important part of our celebration. And fittingly, the opening and closing song was Bread for the World, a piece composed by Marty Haugen on the occasion of Bread's 35th anniversary. We also have a video of the choir performing Pan de Vida (Bob Hurd).

Looking Ahead: The Bread Rising Campaign

Our review of our history was very important for the other purpose that brought us together in this sanctuary: the Bread Rising campaign, which aims to end hunger by 2030. David Miner, national chair of the Bread Rising campaign and an anti-hunger activist in Indianapolis, was a special guest at our service.

The campaign urges Bread members and supporters around the country to take three important actions: 1) increase our commitments to ongoing prayers for the end of hunger; 2) redouble our commitment to advocacy; 3) provide the resources to help our organization leverage the big changes that are needed to end hunger. We asked local Bread members to prepare reflections on those three actions as well as the goal to end hunger in our country by 2030. Those reflections are included in a separate piece that we will be posting soon.

Carlos Navarro has been a Bread member for over 20 years and has led Bread’s presence in New Mexico for the last decade. He maintains the Bread for the World New Mexico website and blog, and serves on the Bread for the World board of directors.

Reprinted with permission from the Bread New Mexico blog.

 

God, Grace, and Good Works

Castle Church - door where 95 Theses were nailedBy Stephen Padre

Once there was a man who thought of establishing a public “lock box” in every town and city in his country. The idea was that a community would collect money in a central place, and the funds would be used to care for poor people, among other things. This “community chest” would make caring for poor people an organized activity and a civic obligation in his country.

If this sounds something like a modern-day government program, the idea is actually 500 years old and came from Martin Luther.

On this day in 1517, Luther, then an Augustinian monk, Catholic priest, and professor, nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany. This action of posting his long list of grievances (protests) against the Catholic Church sparked the Protestant Reformation. And because it happened today, on Halloween (a word that is short for All Hallows Eve, the day before All Saints Day, Nov. 1), many Protestant denominations mark today as Reformation Day.

During his lifetime, Luther wrote volumes of works about many issues, and he became one of the greatest Christian theologians of all time. The theological subject he is perhaps best known for is the idea that we as humans cannot earn God’s favor. Luther struggled with constantly trying to please God but knew that he would always come up short because of his imperfections. Finally he realized, through his study of the Bible, that God’s love is truly and only a gift—it is pure grace. God’s love is freely given to us, apart from anything we can do to earn it, not dependent on our works.

So it’s ironic that I am writing about an organization—Bread for the World—that is devoted to doing good works on a day that is dedicated to the radical idea in the Gospel that our good works don’t save us, the idea that Luther wanted the church in his day to focus on.

So why should we do good works if we don’t have to in order to earn God’s favor?

A popular saying goes: God doesn’t need our good works, but our neighbor does. God’s unconditional grace frees us to do good works—not to win God’s favor, but for our neighbors’ well-being. Bread for the World is working to end hunger so that everybody shares in the abundance of God’s creation. We come together as Christians of all stripes across the country to do these good works through Bread for neighbors near and far.

And so we can look at Luther’s idea of the community chest as a model for ending hunger. The place where our common resources are assembled—the taxes collected by our government—becomes the community chest. Some of these resources are used to assist people when they are hungry, through domestic nutrition programs or through food aid overseas, for example. This work carried out by our federal government on behalf of Americans makes caring for poor people an organized activity and a civic obligation in our country.

Let us go forth and do good works—for the sake of our neighbor—knowing that God’s grace has already saved us.

Stephen Padre is Bread for the World’s managing editor and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Photo: re-creation of the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany, where Martin Luther posted his Ninety-Five Theses. (Stephen Padre)

10 Ways Christians Can Help End Hunger During the Elections

Vote
(Bread for the World)

By Robin Stephenson

I turned my television off last night because the campaign ads were too numerous. Besides telling me little about the candidates, the negative tone put me in a foul mood. However, I will not turn off my commitment to using my citizenship to end hunger.

Each election gives me the opportunity to send a leader to Washington, D.C., who will make ending hunger a priority. Bread for the World has given me all the resources I need. I put my favorite resource on my bulletin board about a month ago to remind me that elections can be another opportunity to live out my faith.

 10 Ways Christians Can Help End Hunger During the Elections.

  1. Develop an “elevator speech” for why ending hunger is important to you as a Christian.
  2. Register to vote.
  3. Write to your local paper saying that ending hunger is a priority for you as a voter.
  4. Learn what the candidates are saying about ending hunger.
  5. Speak about the importance of ending hunger at candidates’ town hall meetings.
  6. Engage your friends. Make sure they are registered and know what the candidates are saying about ending hunger.
  7. Magnify your voice by combining it with those of thousands of other Christians. Become a member of Bread for the Word; organize an Offering of Letters.
  8. Engage your church.
  9. Give money and volunteer time to candidates who are committed to ending hunger.
  10. Vote for candidates who are committed to ending hunger.

Voting matters to me because I don’t believe any person should be hungry.

I am a citizen, not a subject, and I “have a stake, role, and responsibility in my government.” Through voting and advocacy, I can influence the legislative framework that structures our society. My sister in Christ who is farming in Kenya does not have a vote, but her ability to prosper may be connected to global trade laws legislated by my government. Programs that provide access to healthy food, so that my neighbor next door can provide for her child, are created through participatory government.

There is one more thing on this list that I would add: Add your name to the pledge to end hunger.  Join me and others who are raising our voices and making it clear that we vote to end hunger.  

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

For Third Year, Eric Mitchell Named a Top Lobbyist

Mitchell 2014 gathering.php
Eric Mitchell, director of government relations at Bread for the World, addresses anti-hunger advocates before the 2014 Lobby Day in Washington, D.C. (Bread for the World).


For the third time in as many years, Eric Mitchell, director of government relations at Bread for the World, has been named in The Hill newspaper as a top grassroots lobbyist.

The tribute is given each year to a selection of individuals deemed by the newspaper as instrumental in shaping federal policy. Mitchell was recognized for his work influencing anti-hunger legislation.

Mitchell and his policy team spend hundreds of hours on Capitol Hill speaking with and providing data to lawmakers and their staffs on legislation that will help end hunger. But, Mitchell stresses, Bread for the World members actually get them in the door.

“We might have the specialized knowledge to speak about the details of a piece of legislation, like how The Food for Peace Reform Act will get more food aid to millions more hungry people,” says Mitchell, “but members of Congress would never listen to us if they were not hearing from voters back home that ending hunger should be a priority.” 

And when advocates report in-district visits with their members of Congress to their regional organizers, Mitchell and his team follow up with the D.C. offices, increasing the impact of our members' congressional visits.

Mitchell says it is a privilege to represent the faith voice on the Hill.  “We bring something special to the table. There is a church in every congressional district in every state.”

Working closely with members of Congress, he knows the influence the faith voice carries.  “Members of Congress constantly say that the faith community’s voice is important on so many issues,” he says. “Probably more so than any other special interest group, the faith community has leverage to influence public policy both at home and in D.C.”

Congratulations to Mitchell, his staff, and faithful advocates for this distinction.

 

Vote to End Hunger

IVoteToEndHunger

By David Beckmann

Make no mistake: This year's midterm election is incredibly important — and it is less than two weeks away.

It's not just our chance to elect the next group of decision-makers in our country. It's our opportunity to bring hunger to the forefront and let the candidates know where voters stand.

If we miss this moment to galvanize our communities of faith and politicians against hunger, we have little chance of making hunger a priority in the next term, and as we pave the way for the next president.

You can help Bread for the World seize this important opportunity by pledging to take a stand for those most in need this election season. By raising your voice, you'll show there is a huge constituency — and political power — ready to demand change in the service of God. And right now, everyone who answers this call to end hunger will receive a FREE car magnet. It's our way of saying thanks for joining this important movement, and it helps share our Christian vision of a world without hunger.

Your voice and your vote are essential to achieving our goal of ending hunger in the United States and globally by 2030. It begins with people just like you, sharing your Christian values and voting for candidates who prioritize hunger issues.

We must make it clear that God wants us to build a future where hunger is a rare and temporary challenge, not the shared experience of approximately 49 million Americans that it is today. It will take education, training, key partnerships, and faithful advocacy to ensure our values reach the floor of Congress and the president's desk.

But before all of that can happen, we need you to join us and stand up for what we believe in. Sign our simple pledge now.

We've set a goal of 5,000 Christians to affirm their faith by pledging to end hunger. This will send a strong message to the president and Congress that there is a key voting bloc that will hold them accountable.

This truly is your chance to tackle one of the most important issues of our lifetime in a meaningful way, plus you'll receive a free car magnet to help share our vision with more people. It's a win-win!

Together, we can make a difference. Will you join me?

David Beckmann is the president of Bread for the World

 

A Mercy Story

SU Church Alter
Silliman University church. (Adlai Amor)

By Adlai Amor

Bread staff are often invited to preach in congregations across the country. For Bread for the World Sunday, Adlai Amor, director of communications, was invited to preach at the Union Church in Waban in Newton, Mass., and to make a presentation on "Advocacy in a time of Hyper-Partisanship." Here is an excerpt of his sermon when he shared an experience of mercy and compassion during one of his family's most difficult times.

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? 

Micah 6:8

Justice. Mercy. Humility.

I often do not share my mercy story in the United States, other than if I am among Filipinos. But since the late Philippine senator Ninoy Aquino, father of current Philippine president Noynoy Aquio, spent the last years of his life here in Newton, I will share it with you.  

I was just a high school student at Silliman University when Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law in 1972. Ninoy Aquino, other opposition senators, and hundreds of student activists including many from my alma mater (established by Presbyterian missionaries) were arrested.

The economy tanked amid all the uncertainty. I remember my father, a lawyer, earning only the equivalent of $2 in October, November, and December that year. Two dollars to feed, clothe, and educate a family of 7 children in three months. We made it only because of the compassion of friends who had more than we had and my father’s family pooling all their resources to see us through until better times. 

It was a time when I, driven by a sudden lack of freedom, began to take my faith more seriously. But we were luckier than many. Other students, family and friends who were arrested by the military suffered much more. In our worship services, our pastor often drew on Micah 6:8. He stressed that in those times, mercy, compassion, and kindness were our best weapons in fighting injustice and in ensuring that our imprisoned families and friends were cared for.

Several Silliman Church leaders were models of compassion – being kind not only to those who were imprisoned, but also to their jailers. Young soldiers who did not fully understand what they were doing there and why these people were in a military jail.

Thinking back on it, I realize that many members of the Silliman Church and the university community were actually modern Micahs, but working quietly underground. Their roles were certainly not minor, but huge to those who were in prison and to those who imprisoned them. Our weapon of choice was kindness and mercy. Kindness and mercy not only to our friends and family, but also to our foes, the jailer-soldiers and their military commanders.

Justice. Mercy. Humility.

These are what God requires of us. Not just one of them, but all three. I must confess that advocacy is hard work. Advocating justly, mercifully, and with humility is especially difficult to do. There are times when I doubt that God has called me to be an advocate, but God refuses to give up on me. With such love, I cannot simply give up on God.


October Webinar Recap: Elections to Lame Duck

Capitol 2
Congress returns to Washington, D.C. November 12.  (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Robin Stephenson    

The halls of Congress remain relatively quiet as members are in their home districts and states during the last couple of weeks before the midterm elections. They will return to Washington, D.C., on November 12 to get back to the nation’s business. Will they bring back a new commitment to end hunger?

Stephen Hill, Bread for the World’s senior organizer for elections, says that depends on how Bread members are engaging current and potential members of Congress in the next two weeks.

Speaking to Bread for the World members during the monthly legislative update, Hill said, “Making hunger an elections issue requires advocates to build capacity, build relationships, and build for the future.”  Hill has been pioneering new practices to make hunger an election issue in Virginia’s 10th Congressional District, just outside Washington, D.C.

Bread for the World believes we can end hunger by 2030 by building political will to make ending hunger a priority for our nation’s lawmakers. Sending lawmakers to Washington, D.C., with a mandate to end hunger begins on the campaign trail when voters engage them on the issues publicly.  Hill urged advocates to use the election resources designed to make hunger an issue in the next few weeks and in the next couple of years as we head toward the presidential elections of 2016.

Senior domestic policy analyst Christine Meléndez Ashley told Bread members what to expect in the post-election landscape. 

In November, Congress will return to the nation’s capital for what is referred to as a lame duck session:  the final session of the previous Congress before the newly elected 114th Congress begins work in the new year. The first order of business will be the budget, which was extended earlier in the year but expires on December 2. Congress must also pass the fiscal 2015 National Defense Authorization Act and work on a bill to renew $85 billion in tax breaks for individuals and businesses before the short session ends, which is expected to be on December 11.

Several issues that affect hungry people remain unresolved in the 113th Congress.

With two pieces of legislation affecting international hunger, Meléndez urged Bread for the World members to continue asking their members of Congress to cosponsor key bills: In the Senate, The Food for Peace Reform Act (S. 2421) would free up much-needed food-aid resources to feed millions more people in need. Also in the Senate and House is The Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014 (S. 2909/ H.R. 5656) – legislation that will give the U.S. government the tools and resources it needs to better combat chronic hunger and malnutrition as well as to expand and better coordinate U.S. investments in improving global food security. Bread for the World will continue to press members on passing immigration legislation that addresses hunger both here and in sending countries.

The next national grassroots conference call and webinar is scheduled for November 18.

 

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