Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

85 posts categorized "Faith"

Rev. David Beckmann Challenges You to #ShareYourPlate

By Bread Staff

Yes, here’s proof that Rev. David Beckmann can cook – but with the help of two young anti-hunger activists, Elizabeth Quill and Margaret Hudak.

Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, answered a #ShareYourPlate challenge: a Catholic Charities, USA social media campaign to raise awareness about the pervasiveness of hunger. By sharing a cooking video, the #ShareYourPlate campaign reminds us that food is something we all share.

While preparing a taco salad, Quill and Hudak emphasized the need to advocate for programs that help people put food on their table. The girls told Beckmann of a meeting they had with their Virginia members of Congress in which they asked lawmakers to support funding for the SNAP program (formerly food stamps).

Their lobby visit illustrates how sharing a story with your member of Congress is a powerful advocacy tool. It can also help lawmakers understand the reality of hunger in states and districts far removed from their Washington, D.C. offices.

Hudak related her own experience of seeing hunger in the lunchroom at school.  She noticed some students restricted their purchases to only cereal and milk and saw others go without food entirely. “A kid can’t function through the day on milk and cereal,” she said.

Last December, Catholic Charities USA, Bread for the World, and others answered Pope Francis and Caritas Internationalis’ call for a global wave of prayer to end hunger as part of the One Family #FoodForAll campaign.

Rev. Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA, created his own cooking video as a way to build on the #FoodForAll campaign. He then sent out a challenge to others to do the same before November 27 - including a special invitation to Beckmann.

Beckmann now challenges travel writer Rick Steves, community food systems expert Sharon Thornberry – and you.  Create a cooking video or post a photo at #ShareYourPlate and on your Twitter or Facebook page. Share a virtual meal and help bring awareness to the problem of hunger.

Folllow the challengers on Twitter: @DavidBeckmann, @Fr_Larry_Snyder, @RickSteves, and  @OFB_SharonT and tag @bread4theworld with your cooking video.

We Pray for Justice in Ferguson

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(Bread for the World)

Bread for the World issued the following press release earlier today. 

Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, issued this statement today as the country awaits the grand jury’s decision on the Michael Brown case. Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old African-American man, was fatally shot by Darren Wilson, a 28-year-old white police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The grand jury is expected to render its decision to indict or not to indict Officer Wilson this month.

“Bread for the World holds the community of Ferguson, the City of St. Louis, the State of Missouri, and all in this nation in prayer. We pray for shalom, the peace of God thatconveys health, completeness, wholeness, integrity, soundness, welfare, security, reconciliation, prosperity, harmony, and justice.

We confess that we as a nation have allowed racial injustice and the circumstances like those in Ferguson and elsewhere throughout the country to persist. As we pray for forgiveness for ourselves and peace for Michael Brown’s family, we also pray for Darren Wilson, his family, and police officers.

“We support the young people and faith congregations in St. Louis who have vowed to solve these problems through non-violent means. They have sparked renewed interest in activism for a just society, where all can thrive, be respected, and be safe. Bread member and activist Mary Gene Boteler, pastor of Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis; Bread board member Dr. Iva Carruthers of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference; the St. Louis Metropolitan Clergy United; the Metropolitan Congregations United; and the Missouri-wide coalition Hands Up; Clergy United; the Don't Shoot Coalition; along with hundreds of courageous young people struggle to create a local resolution to this national problem and to recommend effective responses.

“We look forward to joining them and others during the Faith Table Gathering in Ferguson in early December to seek effective ways to hold public systems accountable and a unified, national, change agenda.

“Amid the soul searching that the death of Michael Brown revived, Bread recognizes that the legacy of slavery must be reconciled if we are to end hunger and poverty in the United States. Bread takes note that Missouri is the sixth-hungriest state in our nation. Nearly one million Missourians cannot adequately feed themselves or their families. This includes more than 308,000 children, many of whom rely on meals they get while at school.

“Bread also notes that the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and incarcerates people of color at alarming rates with an expansion and militarization of police forces. These factors contribute to hunger and poverty in many communities. We are encouraged that members of Congress from both parties have spoken out about injustices in the legal system, and Bread for the World will support legislation to address these issues.

“Bread is committed to ending hunger and poverty by 2030 while addressing these injustices today, and it works with all people of good will to accomplish that goal. We pray that in the end, justice will ’roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream’ (Amos 5:24).”

 

 

God, Grace, and Good Works

Castle Church - door where 95 Theses were nailedBy Stephen Padre

Once there was a man who thought of establishing a public “lock box” in every town and city in his country. The idea was that a community would collect money in a central place, and the funds would be used to care for poor people, among other things. This “community chest” would make caring for poor people an organized activity and a civic obligation in his country.

If this sounds something like a modern-day government program, the idea is actually 500 years old and came from Martin Luther.

On this day in 1517, Luther, then an Augustinian monk, Catholic priest, and professor, nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany. This action of posting his long list of grievances (protests) against the Catholic Church sparked the Protestant Reformation. And because it happened today, on Halloween (a word that is short for All Hallows Eve, the day before All Saints Day, Nov. 1), many Protestant denominations mark today as Reformation Day.

During his lifetime, Luther wrote volumes of works about many issues, and he became one of the greatest Christian theologians of all time. The theological subject he is perhaps best known for is the idea that we as humans cannot earn God’s favor. Luther struggled with constantly trying to please God but knew that he would always come up short because of his imperfections. Finally he realized, through his study of the Bible, that God’s love is truly and only a gift—it is pure grace. God’s love is freely given to us, apart from anything we can do to earn it, not dependent on our works.

So it’s ironic that I am writing about an organization—Bread for the World—that is devoted to doing good works on a day that is dedicated to the radical idea in the Gospel that our good works don’t save us, the idea that Luther wanted the church in his day to focus on.

So why should we do good works if we don’t have to in order to earn God’s favor?

A popular saying goes: God doesn’t need our good works, but our neighbor does. God’s unconditional grace frees us to do good works—not to win God’s favor, but for our neighbors’ well-being. Bread for the World is working to end hunger so that everybody shares in the abundance of God’s creation. We come together as Christians of all stripes across the country to do these good works through Bread for neighbors near and far.

And so we can look at Luther’s idea of the community chest as a model for ending hunger. The place where our common resources are assembled—the taxes collected by our government—becomes the community chest. Some of these resources are used to assist people when they are hungry, through domestic nutrition programs or through food aid overseas, for example. This work carried out by our federal government on behalf of Americans makes caring for poor people an organized activity and a civic obligation in our country.

Let us go forth and do good works—for the sake of our neighbor—knowing that God’s grace has already saved us.

Stephen Padre is Bread for the World’s managing editor and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Photo: re-creation of the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany, where Martin Luther posted his Ninety-Five Theses. (Stephen Padre)

November's Bread for the Preacher: Seeking Leaders for Justice

6521600661_3c17cb404f_bDid you know that each month the church relations department at Bread for the World produces a resource specifically for pastors? Whether you are searching for inspiration for a sermon you're writing, or just a lectionary enthusiast, Bread for the Preacher is for you.

After reading this introduction, explore this month’s readings on the Bread for the Preacher web page, where you can also sign up to have the resource emailed to you each month.

By Bishop José García

We are at a unique moment in history that makes ending hunger possible by 2030. In order to do this, however, the U.S. government must do its part to lead here and around the world in the work of making hunger history. Bread for the World has a plan to do our part to make this a reality. We must win a series of advocacy victories, urge our government to take the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals seriously, and, of course, elect officials who will make ending hunger a priority by 2017. Our texts make clear this month that now is the time for justice and that justice is impossible without good leaders.

Bread for the World has launched a campaign called Bread Rising, which will enable this plan, strengthen the organization financially, strengthen our collective Christian voice in every congressional district, and ground our advocacy in prayer and God's love. In the coming months, we will be calling on our partners to pray, to act, and to give as part of the campaign. We hope you will join us. To learn more about the campaign visit www.bread.org/rising.

Bishop José García
is the director of church relations at Bread for the World.

Photo: Pastor Judith VanOsdol leads the noon church service at El Milagro (The Miracle) Lutheran Church in Minneapolis, MN. (Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World)

A Mercy Story

SU Church Alter
Silliman University church. (Adlai Amor)

By Adlai Amor

Bread staff are often invited to preach in congregations across the country. For Bread for the World Sunday, Adlai Amor, director of communications, was invited to preach at the Union Church in Waban in Newton, Mass., and to make a presentation on "Advocacy in a time of Hyper-Partisanship." Here is an excerpt of his sermon when he shared an experience of mercy and compassion during one of his family's most difficult times.

He has told you, O mortal, what is good; and what does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? 

Micah 6:8

Justice. Mercy. Humility.

I often do not share my mercy story in the United States, other than if I am among Filipinos. But since the late Philippine senator Ninoy Aquino, father of current Philippine president Noynoy Aquio, spent the last years of his life here in Newton, I will share it with you.  

I was just a high school student at Silliman University when Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law in 1972. Ninoy Aquino, other opposition senators, and hundreds of student activists including many from my alma mater (established by Presbyterian missionaries) were arrested.

The economy tanked amid all the uncertainty. I remember my father, a lawyer, earning only the equivalent of $2 in October, November, and December that year. Two dollars to feed, clothe, and educate a family of 7 children in three months. We made it only because of the compassion of friends who had more than we had and my father’s family pooling all their resources to see us through until better times. 

It was a time when I, driven by a sudden lack of freedom, began to take my faith more seriously. But we were luckier than many. Other students, family and friends who were arrested by the military suffered much more. In our worship services, our pastor often drew on Micah 6:8. He stressed that in those times, mercy, compassion, and kindness were our best weapons in fighting injustice and in ensuring that our imprisoned families and friends were cared for.

Several Silliman Church leaders were models of compassion – being kind not only to those who were imprisoned, but also to their jailers. Young soldiers who did not fully understand what they were doing there and why these people were in a military jail.

Thinking back on it, I realize that many members of the Silliman Church and the university community were actually modern Micahs, but working quietly underground. Their roles were certainly not minor, but huge to those who were in prison and to those who imprisoned them. Our weapon of choice was kindness and mercy. Kindness and mercy not only to our friends and family, but also to our foes, the jailer-soldiers and their military commanders.

Justice. Mercy. Humility.

These are what God requires of us. Not just one of them, but all three. I must confess that advocacy is hard work. Advocating justly, mercifully, and with humility is especially difficult to do. There are times when I doubt that God has called me to be an advocate, but God refuses to give up on me. With such love, I cannot simply give up on God.


A Gift of Song for Bread for World Sunday

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Opening plenary session of Bread for the World's 2011 Gathering, on Saturday, June 11, 2011, at American University. (Rick Reinhard)

Across the nation, from pulpit to pew, Christians will renew their commitment to ending hunger as part of the annual Bread for the World Sunday celebrations taking place this weekend, October 19. 

During a special church service, congregations commit themselves to the fight against hunger and poverty through education, prayer, and worship. Many churches will use song to inspire congregants. 

Longtime Bread supporters and co-pastors of Limestone Presbyterian Church in Wilmington, Del., Bruce and Carolyn Winfrey Gillette offer a new hymn they wanted us to share with you. Carolyn has written many original hymns used by Bread for the World members in past worship services.

Carolyn composed, “Is it Lawful to Pay Taxes?” based on the lectionary reading for October 19. In an email to Bread for the World, Bruce wrote, “We hope it will remind people of our shared responsibility to pay taxes, to work for our taxes being used well for the common good and also our ultimate loyalty always is to God.”

Bread for the World is blessed by our talented membership represented by people like Carolyn and Bruce and grateful for their gift of song.

“Is It Lawful to Pay Taxes?”
BEACH SPRING 8.7.8.7 D ("God Whose Giving Knows No Ending")

“Is it lawful to pay taxes when they prop up Caesar’s rule?”
So some people asked of Jesus, wanting him to seem a fool.
Saying “no” would be sedition; saying “yes” would be a sin.
Jesus changed the conversation, calling them to look within.

“Find a tax coin in your treasure; see the image that it bears.
Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s. (Give to rulers what is theirs.)”
Yet he pressed on with his message; “Give to God what is God’s own.”
We who bear our Maker’s image worship God and God alone.

Lord of all, in every nation, may your word be understood—
That we have an obligation to support the common good.
May our taxes, all together, fund our working hand in hand
So that life will be made better for all people in this land.

Still, we also hear your teaching: “Give to God what God is due.”
May no ruler—overreaching—try to take the place of you.
May we listen to your message, may we honor what is yours;
May we, living in your image, seek your kingdom that endures.

Biblical References: Matthew 22:15-22; Mark 12:13-17 and Luke 20:20-26. Tune: The Sacred Harp, 1844; attributed to Benjamin Franklin White (MIDI) Text: Copyright © 2014 by Carolyn Winfrey Gillette. All rights reserved. Email: bcgillette@comcast.net New Hymns: http://www.carolynshymns.com

Churches Get Ready to Celebrate Bread for the World Sunday this Fall

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Rev. Dr. Barbara Rossing, professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, has written a lectionary study for Bread for the World Sunday.

On Oct. 19 or other weekends this fall, thousands of churches around the country will celebrate Bread for the World Sunday. From small outposts in Alaska to gothic sanctuaries in Manhattan, worshippers will be invited to turn their faith into action in support of measures that help end hunger in the United States and abroad.

In previous years, churches have engaged in an impressive range of activities.  Puppet shows have been created, special sermons delivered, and educational hours devoted to hearing from those on the frontlines of hunger. For some, bread baking has been a theme–for use during the Eucharist and for bake sales after worship.

Many churches have a special offering or collection, often dividing the funds between Bread for the World and their denomination’s hunger program. Some churches conduct an Offering of Letters for the first time in the year or as a complement to their spring letter-writing event.

Most churches will distribute bulletin inserts provided by Bread for the World. These inserts include a brief prayer and give interested individuals the opportunity to sign up to receive email messages that will support ongoing prayers for the end of hunger.

A special four-page guide is also available to aid planning a Bread for the World Sunday observance. The guide focuses on Scripture study and prayer as key components of nurturing a faith that works to end of hunger. Rev. Dr. Barbara Rossing, professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, has written a commentary on Matthew 22:15-22, the Gospel appointed in the Common Lectionary for Oct. 19.  Her reflection, titled “Even Taxes Belong to God,” will be useful for preachers and Bible studies.

Commenting on Matthew 22, Rossing states, “Inspired by Jesus’ wit and courage in speaking truth to power, we can join our voices with thousands of others. Speaking together, we can keep the pressure on those we have elected to enact just food policies and laws.”

Jack Jezreel, the founder of JustFaith Ministries, has prepared a new litany or responsive prayer that many congregations will use during worship. Among the petitions is the prayer that we “not be satisfied until all people can pray with gratitude for daily bread.”

For the first time this year, a lectionary study for Bread Sunday has been written in Spanish by Rev. Magdalena I. Garcia of Ravenswood Presbyterian Church, Chicago. Javier Bustamante of the Catholic Diocese of Metuchen, N.J., has prepared a Spanish-language litany. A Spanish translation of the Bread Sunday bulletin insert is available at www.bread/domingo.

All of the English-language resources can be viewed and downloaded free at www.bread.org/sunday. Bulletin inserts and offering envelopes may be ordered free of charge online or by phoning 800-822-7323, ext. 1072.

Reflection: Babies Seek and Remember

Baby 500
(Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).


By Kierra Jackson

 “And when he had taken some bread and given thanks, he broke it and gave it to them, saying, "This is my body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of me." (Luke 22:19)

My interest in maternal and child nutrition brought me to my full-time job at Bread for the World where I work as the major gifts coordinator/development officer. On the side, I help deliver babies as a trained doula. Something I’ve learned in this work is that, as humans, we remember—even in our very first minutes and hours of life.

If you’ve ever seen a baby pass from life in the body to life out in the world, you may have noticed a couple of things. First, in the moments before birth, there’s this rush—a mighty wind of hands, instructions, encouraging words, heightened speech, and amplified energy—all to prepare for and to welcome this fresh human being into the world. If possible, the newborn is brought close to the mother, skin to skin, to regulate her body temperature and to encourage bonding, which helps in breastfeeding.

This is my body.

Keep watching and you’ll see that mother and baby coo at each other, cry tears of joy and relief at each other. They touch and start getting to know one another.

It takes a couple minutes before a newborn begins to use language. She’ll begin by licking the air, stick her little pink tongue out and pull it back in, open her mouth and then look for her hands and bring them to her mouth.

“I am the bread of life,” Jesus said.

The search is a steady and relentless one. Her head bobs, hands grab, tongue licks, and then a bit of grunting or fussing. In cases where moms need extra medical attention, a baby will often be placed with her shirtless father to share the positive effects of skin-to-skin contact with a parent. Even then she’s searching, and sometimes finds a nipple—a dad nipple!

This is my body which is given for you; do this in remembrance.

You see, babies know. They seem to have this ability to remember that the greatest gift to them is the body. Even when they are born, they long to return to the body that has been broken open for them, that will feed them, hold them, nurture and love them.

Before they even have the fullness of memory, I like to believe that babies have shared words with Jesus. That Christ said, “Remember me, baby, remember me. I love you.”

So, for many of us who have heard this regular reminder to remember, we do just that.

We remember the unique needs of maternal and child nutrition. We remember that food is the first thing we long for, that it sustains the body. Without it, we are most fragile. We remember that our work at Bread for the World, in its many forms, is so critical to feeding babies, mothers, and fathers.

Christ gave us his body that we might remember. Let us give thanks for this life-giving gift.

Kierra Jackson is major gifts coordinator at Bread for the World. She is also a trained birth doula.

Bread for the Preacher: A Just and Loving Social Order

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 (Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World)

Did you know that each month the church relations department at Bread for the World produces a resource specifically for pastors? Whether you are searching for inspiration for a sermon you're writing, or just a lectionary enthusiast, Bread for the Preacher is for you.

After reading this introduction, explore this month’s readings on the Bread for the Preacher web page, where you can also sign up to have the resource emailed to you each month.

By Rev.Nancy Neal

I have been part of several conversations in the last few days about how the news seems more troubling than usual. There is trouble in Ferguson, Mo., in Iraq and Syria, in Israel and Palestine, and Ukraine. There are unaccompanied refugee children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and floods, droughts, and earthquakes in the western parts of the United States. We are more aware of happenings around the world because of technology and the internet, but it seems that this only brings us closer to some aspect of injustice.

And hunger is front and center. As Bread for the World seeks to end hunger by 2030, we will be working on a variety of issues through the lens of hunger because we are working for an end of hunger that is sustainable and just. The texts this month remind us that God is relentless in working for a just and loving social order. Each week offers us an opportunity to explore aspects of God’s righteousness, whether it is through stories of forgiveness and fair wages or even God’s call through the prophets for repentance.

Reverend Nancy Neal is the associate for denominational women's organzation relations at Bread for the World

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures for Parents and Children at the Border

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Catarina Pascual Jimenez (center) feeds her two twins. (Bread for the World)

By Bishop José García

The Holy Scripture relates the story of a mother, Jochebed. Hard times and a famine led her country to a condition of slavery, oppression, and persecution. Her child was under a death sentence. All of these circumstances led her to take a desperate solution. Rather than waiting for the direst of outcomes, she put the baby in a basket and placed him in the river banks, hoping this way he would have better chances for survival.  

This same story within a 21st century context is now repeated for thousands of families in Central America. Parents are facing hunger, poverty and hard times in their countries. Oppression and violence threaten their children. Many have two options: join the organized criminal gangs or die. Out of desperation these parents are doing the same thing Jochebed did, sending their children on a journey to a country where they will have better chances to live and make better choices. The Los Angeles Times reported recently that some of the children who have been deported back to their home country have lost their lives upon their return, victims of the violence they fled. It is by God’s grace only that we enjoy the freedom and privileges of our country. We cannot ignore the plight of these children and their families.

The Bible teaches that there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him(Romans 10:12). Jesus taught us that we should love our neighbor as ourselves. In a more direct admonition about the treatment of immigrants among us, Leviticus 19:33-34 says: “When an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.”

As Christians, we are called to live by the principles and values of the Kingdom of God, and to be an extension of Jesus’s love, compassion, and example of service. The Scripture admonishes us, “Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to do it” (Proverbs 3:27). We have the power to call our members of Congress to respond to this crisis in a compassionate way. And our members of Congress have the power to act with a humanitarian and dignified way to this crisis.

Will you act?

Email your members of Congress.  Simply say: I urge you to respond to the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border. Please pass legislation that addresses the conditions of poverty, hunger, and violence in Central America that are forcing them to leave.

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