Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

217 posts categorized "Foreign Aid"

Urgent: Tell Senators to Pass the Global Food Security Act

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By Eric Mitchell

Thanks to your calls, letters, and emails, the House of Representatives just passed the Global Food Security Act late last night. The Senate has two days left to pass this bill into law.

People told us Congress was too gridlocked to pass this bill, but we proved them wrong. As people of faith, we spoke up with a united voice and convinced Democrats and Republicans alike to authorize Feed the Future, the program under this law. Last year, this program reached 12.5 million children.

Feed the Future is improving the lives of millions of people around the world, ensuring that young children receive the proper nourishment that enables them to grow and thrive. It also gives smallholder farmers access to new tools and technologies that improve yields and boost incomes.

If the Senate can pass the Global Food Security Act (S. 2909) in the next two days, Feed the Future will become law. We need the Senate to vote on this bill before leaving for the holidays. With only a couple of days left in the 113th Congress, we need you to act now!

Call (800/826-3688) or email your U.S. senators today. Urge your senator to pass the Global Food Security Act (S. 2909)!

God is moving in our time to end hunger, and the legislation Congress considers is a part of that movement. You are a part of this movement! A bill that once appeared blocked by gridlock is so close to becoming law. Call your senators today, and push S. 2909 over the finish line.

Eric Mitchell is the director of government relations at Bread for the World.

 

Being Free of Hunger and Poverty is a Human Right

FreedompicBy Will Coupe

Bread for the World celebrates today the 66th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the rights it set out. As a voice for and with people who are marginalized, we hold these rights closely and believe in the worth and dignity of all human beings.

Ensuring that all people have the right to live free of hunger and poverty is the reason Bread supports anti-poverty programs like the earned income tax credit (EITC), child tax credit (CTC), international food aid, and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.

The UDHR grew out of the Four Freedoms adopted by the Allied powers as basic war aims during World War II. The Four Freedoms are freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.

The freedoms were based on a State of the Union address delivered by Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941. FDR proposed that these freedoms were fundamental freedoms which everyone in the world ought to enjoy.

A major emphasis in FDR’s speech, coming during the Great Depression, is the freedom from want, which establishes a minimum entitlement to food, clothing, and housing. FDR began his speech with "freedom from want—which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants—everywhere in the world."

Article 25 in the UDHR recognizes the freedom from want and reads partially as “everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and his family, including food, clothing, housing…”

FDR’s speech became the inspiration for the much-heralded “Freedom from Want” oil painting by Norman Rockwell. The painting, also known as “The Thanksgiving Picture” or “I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” depicts a family around a dinner table preparing to share a holiday meal.

The painting is the third in the Four Freedom series by Rockwell. The painting is an idyllic representation of family values and clearly illustrates the concept of the freedom from want. The painting, which was first published in “The Saturday Evening Post,” included a companion essay written by Carlos Bulosan, a Filipino immigrant and labor organizer.

Today’s anniversary is great cause for celebration and to reflect on the progress that has resulted from it. But at the same time, further push must continue to end hunger. Every year we produce more than enough to feed every single person in the world, yet nearly 1 billion go to bed hungry every night. This is the greatest scandal of our age. The problem is not a shortage but rather that undernourished people, who need food most, do not have access to it.

As the world’s largest donor of food aid, the United States can free up even more food resources and prioritize nutrition. A bill in the Senate, The Food for Peace Reform Act (S. 2421), addresses reform, and we are urging senators to cosponsor the bill. Celebrate the UDHR by advocating for the right to live free of hunger and email your senator today.

Will Coupe was a fall intern in the communications department at Bread for the World.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons 

 

Urgent: Critical Hunger-Related Bill Up for Vote Now

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By Ryan Quinn

Thanks to your recent calls and emails, Congress looks to be voting on the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656) this week.

This act would put in place a framework for the federal government that is a smart approach to providing assistance to people who are hungry. It recognizes that, in order to end hunger, we don't just need to make more food available, but we need quality, nutritious food and systems to get it to the people who need it most.

The program this act would put in place would work on a local level to empower small farmers, growing local economies while feeding hungry people. It's a win for everybody.

Congress has only a few days of work left in this session. With this bill coming to the House floor, passage of the Global Food Security Act becomes critical. We need you to act now. Call (800/826-3688) or email your U.S. representative today. Urge your U.S. representative to pass the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656)!

Let Congress know that in a world in which nearly 805 million people — one in every eight — grapple with hunger on a daily basis, U.S. leadership is vital in the fight against hunger, malnutrition, and extreme poverty over the long-term. This legislation is a big step on the road to conquer the challenge.

Ryan Quinn is a senior policy advisor at Bread for the World.

A Potentially Deadly Question: What Will Syrian Refugees Do With No Money to Buy Food?

By Beth Ann Saracco

“I ask the U.N. not to leave us. We need food, diesel, and clothes…Soon it will start to snow. What do we do?”

These questions and this desperate plea were voiced by Aisha, a Syrian refugee, in an article by The Associated Press, who painted a picture of a dire situation coming together for people like her who have fled their war-torn country. Recently “60 Minutes” covered the Syrian refugee crisis and how essentials like access to food could soon dry up.                              

On Monday, the U.N. World Food Program (WFP) announced it would suspend its food voucher program due to a severe cash shortfall, a decision that will leave nearly 1.7 million Syrian refugees in neighboring countries, such as Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey struggling to pay for food. Prior to the program’s suspension, the WFP was providing refugees with $15 to $45 monthly voucher cards to purchase food in local markets. The suspension couldn’t have come at a worse time – as winter approaches. 

The demand for humanitarian aid around the world is unprecedented at the moment. In fact, the United Nations has declared “Level 3” humanitarian emergencies – the highest U.N. classification for the most severe, large-scale humanitarian crises – in Syria, Iraq, South Sudan, the Central African Republic, and West Africa.

 The WFP made the decision to suspend the Syrian refugee program due to the complex nature of the Syrian crisis and a shortfall in funding from pledges not received. At a pledging conference earlier this year in Kuwait, more than $2 billion was pledged by donor countries, but only about 40 percent has been committed, leaving a shortfall for this month of $64 million. Refugee operations in Kuwait cost approximately $35 million a week.

To fill the gap, the WFP is calling on major donor countries like the United States and Middle East countries including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Bahrain to make good on their pledges.  While the U.S. has met a large portion of its commitment, it needs to place this issue at the top of its diplomatic agenda and use its leadership to urge other nations to meet their own pledging commitments.

Furthermore, Congress needs to take action and pass President Obama’s Ebola supplemental request of $6.2 billion. The request is critical because the money supports the International Disaster Assistance account which funds not only the U.S. response to Ebola overseas, but also some of the U.S. contribution to the WFP. We urge Bread for the World members to call Congress and ask their senators and representative to pass President Obama’s Ebola supplemental request and include funding for the International Disaster Assistance account.

Beth Ann Saracco is an international policy analyst at Bread for the World

Former Bread Staffer Gyude Moore Takes On Liberia's Roads as Public Works Minister

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Gyude Moore. (Bread for the World)

By Robin Stephenson

Former Bread for the World staffer and board member Gyude Moore is paving the way for a more food-secure Liberia. Bread is pleased to learn that Moore, a native of Liberia, was confirmed today as the West African nation’s new Minister of Public Works. 

Leading the government agency responsible for fixing Liberia’s road system, Moore faces a daunting, but not insurmountable task. The nation is still recovering from a 14-year civil war – recovery that is now complicated by the worst Ebola outbreak in history.

The Ebola virus, affecting several West African countries, is expected to leave a full-blown food crisis in its wake. More than 3,000 Liberians have died from Ebola, leaving harvests endangered, markets disrupted, and food prices high. Increased food insecurity adds urgency to fixing Liberia’s highways and byways, conduits to move life-saving resources throughout the country. The deplorable state of roads makes reaching quarantined communities with food and health services unnecessarily difficult and time consuming.

Moore is ready for the challenge. “Ebola has re-emphasized the need for these roads as they are the major connection between rural communities and health facilities,” he wrote in an email to Bread after his confirmation. “I am excited about the opportunity of expanding these roads into parts of the country that are yet without roads.”

Roads-Liberia1Liberia has 66,000 miles of roads, but less than 7 percent are paved. USAID reports, “it is cheaper, by volume, to ship rice the 7,500 miles from Thailand to Monrovia than it is from Gbarnga, a leading agricultural community just over 100 miles away.”

Although the resource-rich nation remains one of the poorest, Liberia has made steady economic progress through hard work and strategic partnerships.

“Our road infrastructure development is a critical portion of our poverty reduction and development strategy,” Moore said in the email.  “This is especially true for our farm to market-feeder road programs.”

The West often takes roads for granted, but for fragile post-conflict countries like Liberia, an impassable thoroughfare is a roadblock keeping agricultural products from markets with dire consequences for farmer’s livelihoods.

Agriculture accounts for 61 percent of Liberia’s GDP, and strengthening the industry is a key component in overcoming high rates of hunger and malnutrition. Investments from U.S.-funded Feed the Future and companion programs are critical to Liberia’s efforts to build agricultural resiliency. Feed the Future takes into account the entire agricultural value chain – all inputs required to move a product from farm to consumer.

Earlier this year, Feed the Future helped farmers produce a rice surplus in Lofa County. But surpluses won’t lead to economic self-sufficiency if farmers can’t reach a market to sell them. Passable roads are an important link in the agriculture value chain.

Moore’s days as a grassroots organizer may seem like a lifetime ago, but he has never forgotten them. “In essence, I never really left Bread,” he said in the email, “because even in this role, I’m doing the same things we did at Bread, except now in a different capacity.”

Read more about Moore’s path back to Liberia in this 2012 Bread for the World interview

You can support legislation to make Feed the Future permanent by contacting your member of Congress today and urging them to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and a senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

Inset photo:  Liberian road. (USAID)

It's #GivingTuesday, Give Your Tue-Cents!

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By Ryan Quinn

As a countermeasure to Black Friday and Cyber Monday, today is #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. Giving Tuesday reminds us to give to people who need it most. Thousands of organizations across the world are taking part in this new holiday tradition of generosity.

Today we are asking you to give your Tue-cents in two ways: At Bread for the World, we welcome your generosity and gifts to support our mission. But today we also encourage you to give back through your advocacy.

In fact, your giving and advocacy efforts toward ending hunger have been working already. Right before Thanksgiving, a House committee unanimously approved the Global Food Security Act (HR 5656). It still needs to pass through a Senate committee before being voted upon in the full House and Senate.

With only 10 days left in Congress’ schedule this year, now is the time for it to act to improve global food and nutrition security. We need you to email your members of Congress today. Tell Congress to pass the Global Food Security Act!

In passing this legislation, we can help solidify U.S. leadership in fighting poverty and claim another victory in our fight against hunger, malnutrition, and extreme poverty over the long-term. We look forward to a day when 805 million chronically undernourished people in our world becomes zero.

Call (800/826-3688) or email your members of Congress today, and urge them to support the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909)!

Ryan Quinn is a senior policy advisor at Bread for the World

 

What We Are Thankful For

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(Bread for the World)

By Rev. David Beckmann

We have a lot to be thankful for this year at Bread for the World, and you're at the top of the list. I thank God for you.

Here are just a few examples of the incredible work you have helped accomplish this year:

We won reforms that have allowed U.S. food assistance to reach 1.5 million more hungry people. Humanitarian crises in South Sudan and Syria along with the terrifying spread of Ebola in West Africa have dramatically increased the need for food aid, so our successful campaign to increase the reach of U.S. food aid could not have come at a more critical time.

As unaccompanied children crossed the U.S. border, fleeing violence at home and often deplorable treatment in detention centers, you opened your heart. You sent more than 10,000 personalized emails to your members of Congress urging them to protect these vulnerable children while addressing the root causes of their plight in the long term. A bill has been introduced into the House (H.R. 5368) to address these concerns.

On Monday, Bread for the World Institute launched its 2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish ... We Can End Hunger. Because of their leading role in farming, caregiving, and child nutrition, women are the primary agents the world relies on to fight hunger.  Your support makes this research and analysis possible.

And in June, we celebrated 40 years of your faithful advocacy and victories from earlier decades. We also launched Bread Rising: A Campaign to End Hunger, the most ambitious campaign in Bread's history. More to come on this campaign in the new year.

Through your dedication and through God's amazing work, we have accomplished so much. But our work isn't finished yet. As you gather around your Thanksgiving table, I ask you to pray for people who are hungry. And to pray harder for our nation and our leaders — that we might realize the political will to end hunger.

Are you asking yourself, "What more can I do?" If you have just five minutes, please help with this urgent opportunity to make a difference for people who are hungry around the world right now: email your members of Congress, and urge them to co-sponsor the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909), which will boost agricultural development and address malnutrition. It passed out of the House Foreign Affairs Committee last week and will be voted upon next in the full House.

Rev. David Beckmann is the president of Bread for the World.

Anna Gaye: A Farmer's Story

By Robin Stephenson

Your calls and emails helped move the Global Food Security Act of 2014 over the first hurdle yesterday. H.R. 5656 passed out of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. Now we encourage the Senate to do the same and hope to see both chambers vote on a final bill before they leave for the holiday recess in early December.

Anna Gaye’s story illustrates how the initiative is working to end hunger.

In 2013, President Obama met with Gaye and other farmers in Mampatim, Senegal who are decreasing food insecurity in their communities with the help of U.S. foreign assistance. Gaye is part of a 600-member farming cooperative that has been aided by USAID’s Feed the Future initiative. Gaye wrote about the meeting for USAID

First, I demonstrated a traditional method of rice processing. I tried not to smile as he took the heavy ram from my hands and started pounding the pestle himself. “That’s painful!” the president said through his translator, examining his hands a minute later. 

“That’s what women lived with every day before our partnership with Feed the Future,” I said.

That partnership brought, among other benefits, a portable, electric rice mill, which was also on display. The mill takes only 20 minutes to separate 40 kilograms of rice, which previously would take an entire day. The president was curious as to who actually owned the machine, and I explained our group manages it for our common use. 

The mill, I explained, was very important to our progress. My fellow farmers and I were initially reluctant to grow more rice since the task of having to pound so much more would be huge. Our acquisition of the milling machines changed all that. We were free from the drudgery of the pestle.  

The time saved also gives us more time to engage in commercial activities, such as the production and sale of palm oil and nutritious rice porridge made ​​with peanuts, not to mention time to prepare for the next growing season. 

Since 2010, the Feed the Future initiative has been addressing the root causes that create food insecurity. Farming cooperatives and knowledge sharing have helped farmers like Gaye increase their bargaining power and therefore, their food production. In 2013, seven million small farmers increased crop production and provided nutritious food to 12.5 million children that year alone.

With results like that, it is time to make the program permanent law. This is a smart approach that recognizes that, in order to end hunger, we don't just need to make more food, but we need quality, nutritious food and systems in place to get it to the people who need it most.

Let's keep the momentum going. Call (800/826-3688) or email your representative and both your senators, and urge them to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909).

To learn more read, Bill Analysis: The Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and a senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

Act Now: Tell Congress to Cosponsor the Global Food Security Act

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Stunting dropped an estimated 9 percent over the past three years in Ethiopia with the United States’ help through Feed the Future. An estimated 160,000 children are growing up stronger and healthier. (Nena Terrell/USAID)


By Ryan Quinn

Next week, many of us will be fortunate enough to gather around tables piled high with turkey, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pie. In expressing our gratitude for the abundance before us, we can also call to mind the role we can play in ending hunger at home and around the world.

Sometimes that means service, like volunteering in a soup kitchen. But right now we have the opportunity to make a huge difference for hungry people with one simple action: Urge your members of Congress to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act today!

Right now, more than 800 million people around the world are hungry, and approximately 1 in 4 children under age five is stunted due to poor nutrition, leaving them with serious complications that can last their entire lives.

But this problem is solvable. Tomorrow, the House Foreign Affairs Committee will vote on legislation that would dramatically reduce world hunger, and it needs your support.

The Global Food Security Act would put in place the Feed the Future framework. This is a smart approach that recognizes that, in order to end hunger, we don't just need to make more food, but we need quality, nutritious food and systems in place to get it to the people who need it most.

The Feed the Future program would work on a local level to empower small farmers, growing the local economy while feeding hungry people. A true win-win.

Feed the Future can save lives. But it's important to act right now. The bill is about to go before powerful congressional committees that can push it forward or stall it indefinitely. We need an immediate and powerful show of support. Will you speak out now?

Call (800/826-3688) or email your representative and both your senators, and urge them to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909). Your advocacy today could make a lifesaving difference for a hungry child.

To learn more read, Bill Analysis: The Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Ryan Quinn is the senior international policy analyst at Bread for the World.

The Changing Story of Women

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Nimna Diayte. (Stephane Tourné/USAID)

By Robin Stephenson

The narrative of women is often a story of discrimination and marginalization. The face of poverty is disproportionately female. But as we write history, we have the power to change the story by empowering women.

New models of development show investing in women increases food security.

Programs, like Feed the Future, that make women’s capabilities a central component to agriculture and nutrition investment are yielding some impressive results: Seven million small farmers increased crop production and provided nutritious food to 12.5 million children in 2013 alone.

Nimna Diayté, a mother of six from Senegal, is one of those farmers. Diayté was barely making a living farming five acres of maize. A year later, she increased her acreage to 13 and tripled her income. Feed the Future helped create a collective so that farmers in Diayté’s community could increase their bargaining power. Diayté didn’t just benefit from the farming collective; she now leads it! Her knowledge and experience are transforming her community from one of scarcity to bounty.

She writes, “[t]he Feed the Future initiative helped us help each other, leading to the formation of a federation of some 3,000 producers who last year produced and sold 13,000 tons of corn on 5,000 hectares of land to feed our families and plan for next season.”

Bread for the World recommends Congress make Feed the Future permanent law.

In developing countries, most women work in subsistence farming. When women organize to work within groups, they are better able to overcome the gender discrimination they experience as individuals. Empowering women like Nimna Diayté as agents of change in the fight against food insecurity is the theme of the 2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger.

The report, which will launch November 24 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., looks at discrimination as a cause of persistent hunger and makes policy and program recommendations that would empower women both in the United States and around the world. Increasing women’s earning potential by boosting bargaining power, reducing gender inequality in unpaid work, increasing women’s political representation, and eliminating the wage gap between male and female labor directly contributes to ending hunger.

Before the turn of the 19th century, women’s work in the United States was confined to the home and was often unpaid. Women's work has long been a vital force in the U.S. economy and, with fair polices, may finally be free from entrenched and interconnected racism and sexism. With the recent elections, women's voices – a historic 100 voices in Congress - are an increasing influence in U.S. politics.

The story of women is unfinished, and the conclusion depends on what we do today. However, one thing is clear: empowering women benefits everyone.

To learn more about the 2015 Hunger Report, When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger, read the executive summary. And join us Monday, November 24, 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM EST, as we live Tweet the launch with the hashtag  #Hunger Report.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and a senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

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