Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

374 posts categorized "Global Hunger"

The Gender Matrix

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Reprinted from the Hewlett Foundation Blog: Work in Progress. Bread for the World Institute is a Hewlett Foundation grantee. 

By Alfonsina Peñaloza

In the movie The Matrix, the main character, Neo, is offered two pills: a red one, which will show him the painful truth of life outside the Matrix; and a blue one, which will erase all memory of what has occurred and send him back to blissful ignorance within it. Sometimes I feel that trying to understand gender and development issues, we’re all Neo, working inexorably towards our own moments of choice. A word of caution: once you look at the world through the lens of gender-based differences in power and opportunity, you can never unsee it.

Today, Bread for the World Institute launched its flagship 2015 Hunger Report. This year’s edition focuses on women’s economic empowerment, tackling issues that are at the forefront of gender and development. Poverty affects women differently than men. Working conditions, discrimination, and social norms mean women and the work they perform (both within and outside the economy) are less valued then men and their work. Women experience more poverty in terms of income, and are also more impoverished in other ways—education, health, time.

Nowhere is this clearer than in the burden of domestic work. Women and girls are usually responsible for what is sometimes called reproductive work, such as taking care of family, cooking, and cleaning. More women have joined the workforce, but men have not stepped up at home, so overall women work more and get paid less. The upshot is that many women (particularly in low-income countries) work double shifts, one of which one is unpaid.

Bread for the World Institute's report also highlights the importance of collective action. A critical element of empowerment is voice, and women who advocate collectively for their rights are more likely to be heard.

Perhaps most important, the 2014 Hunger Report draws a very clear picture: Women are missing from economic data. We just don’t know how and how much women are contributing to the economy, since most of their work is undervalued, invisible in the statistics, or both. This is not a data gap like many others we worry about in global development; it’s a reflection of systemic gender-bias, and it prevents sound policy-making.

To accompany the report, Bread for the World Institute launched a powerful visualization tool to illustrate how women are missing from data.

The tool allows you to search by country, region and five main indicator categories: public life, human rights, health, education and economic participation. Each indicator – such as mortality rate or wage gap- is represented by a pixel, and all the pixels together make up the picture of a woman. The more data available, the clearer the image. The conclusion is stark: in most cases we can’t see the women, and so the visualization imparts a powerful message: without the data, women can’t be seen. And if they can’t be seen, how can women have a voice and a seat at the table where economic decisions are made?

Data

(As an aside: This tool was created at a hackathon, and initially set out to visualize data on women’s economic empowerment. It ended up taking a much more novel approach by visualizing the absence of data, rather than the data itself. It cost the organization no money other than the costs of organizing the hackathon—a great example of how innovation and creativity can go a long way in the face of limited resources.)

Bread for the World Institute has always included women in their reports. After all, the role that women play as caregivers and farmers puts them at the center of the hunger issue. However, this year’s report doesn’t just include women as research subjects; rather, it examines the social constructs and the gender biases in policies that hold women back, and impede development. You could even say that Bread for the World Institute has come to their moment of choice and decided to take the red pill, applying a gender lens to their work and seeing for the first time behind the “Gender Matrix.” Like Neo waking up to his revolution, there is no going back.

Alfonsina Peñaloza is a program officer in the global development and population program at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

 

World Bank President Praises Bread at Annual New York City Gala

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World Bank President Dr. Jim Yong Kim speaking at an annual World Bank meeting (photo courtesy of The World Bank).

By Jennifer Gonzalez

Earlier this week, Dr. Jim Yong Kim, president of the World Bank, lauded the work of Bread for the World and its goal of ending hunger by 2030 at the 11th Annual Gala to End Hunger in New York City. However, he made it clear that numerous forces such as climate change, especially extreme weather events, will make achieving the goal a challenging one.  

Kim said scientists are predicting that about 40 percent of the arable land in Africa will be gone by 2040. At the same time, the demand for food will increase as the world’s population continues to grow.

“If the predictions are correct about what is going to happen with agriculture, we are in big trouble on the hunger front,” he said. “Setting a target of 2030 is great.  “It will force us to look at all the interconnected aspects of our life and the world today to get to that target.”

He made his remarks during an interview conducted by Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, at the gala. The event was hosted by Bread for the World, Bread for the World Institute, and the Alliance to End Hunger.

Kim suggested that one way to solve the agriculture issue is to implement climate-smart strategies, such as alternatively growing rice during wet and dry seasons. That, he said, could reduce greenhouse gas emissions and slow down the process of arable land loss in Africa.

Kim urged Bread and its allies to continue their work, especially convincing U.S. legislators on the need to stamp out food insecurity here and abroad. He said he’s worried that the issue of food insecurity will only grow worse as extreme weather events intensify.

“These events always cut hardest on the poorest people,” he said. “What do we know about Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone? Twenty-five percent to as high as 40 percent of farmers have stopped working. They are eating their seed corn. We are looking at potential famine in these counties on top of the Ebola outbreak.”

For its part, Kim said the World Bank is looking into creating financial instruments that could help alleviate the impact of famine in poor countries. He said the notion of ending hunger by 2030 is a plausible goal as long as there is an understanding that it needs to be confronted on multiple fronts.

Jennifer Gonzalez is the associate online editor at Bread for the World.

Anna Gaye: A Farmer's Story

By Robin Stephenson

Your calls and emails helped move the Global Food Security Act of 2014 over the first hurdle yesterday. H.R. 5656 passed out of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. Now we encourage the Senate to do the same and hope to see both chambers vote on a final bill before they leave for the holiday recess in early December.

Anna Gaye’s story illustrates how the initiative is working to end hunger.

In 2013, President Obama met with Gaye and other farmers in Mampatim, Senegal who are decreasing food insecurity in their communities with the help of U.S. foreign assistance. Gaye is part of a 600-member farming cooperative that has been aided by USAID’s Feed the Future initiative. Gaye wrote about the meeting for USAID

First, I demonstrated a traditional method of rice processing. I tried not to smile as he took the heavy ram from my hands and started pounding the pestle himself. “That’s painful!” the president said through his translator, examining his hands a minute later. 

“That’s what women lived with every day before our partnership with Feed the Future,” I said.

That partnership brought, among other benefits, a portable, electric rice mill, which was also on display. The mill takes only 20 minutes to separate 40 kilograms of rice, which previously would take an entire day. The president was curious as to who actually owned the machine, and I explained our group manages it for our common use. 

The mill, I explained, was very important to our progress. My fellow farmers and I were initially reluctant to grow more rice since the task of having to pound so much more would be huge. Our acquisition of the milling machines changed all that. We were free from the drudgery of the pestle.  

The time saved also gives us more time to engage in commercial activities, such as the production and sale of palm oil and nutritious rice porridge made ​​with peanuts, not to mention time to prepare for the next growing season. 

Since 2010, the Feed the Future initiative has been addressing the root causes that create food insecurity. Farming cooperatives and knowledge sharing have helped farmers like Gaye increase their bargaining power and therefore, their food production. In 2013, seven million small farmers increased crop production and provided nutritious food to 12.5 million children that year alone.

With results like that, it is time to make the program permanent law. This is a smart approach that recognizes that, in order to end hunger, we don't just need to make more food, but we need quality, nutritious food and systems in place to get it to the people who need it most.

Let's keep the momentum going. Call (800/826-3688) or email your representative and both your senators, and urge them to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909).

To learn more read, Bill Analysis: The Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and a senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

Rev. David Beckmann Challenges You to #ShareYourPlate

By Bread Staff

Yes, here’s proof that Rev. David Beckmann can cook – but with the help of two young anti-hunger activists, Elizabeth Quill and Margaret Hudak.

Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, answered a #ShareYourPlate challenge: a Catholic Charities, USA social media campaign to raise awareness about the pervasiveness of hunger. By sharing a cooking video, the #ShareYourPlate campaign reminds us that food is something we all share.

While preparing a taco salad, Quill and Hudak emphasized the need to advocate for programs that help people put food on their table. The girls told Beckmann of a meeting they had with their Virginia members of Congress in which they asked lawmakers to support funding for the SNAP program (formerly food stamps).

Their lobby visit illustrates how sharing a story with your member of Congress is a powerful advocacy tool. It can also help lawmakers understand the reality of hunger in states and districts far removed from their Washington, D.C. offices.

Hudak related her own experience of seeing hunger in the lunchroom at school.  She noticed some students restricted their purchases to only cereal and milk and saw others go without food entirely. “A kid can’t function through the day on milk and cereal,” she said.

Last December, Catholic Charities USA, Bread for the World, and others answered Pope Francis and Caritas Internationalis’ call for a global wave of prayer to end hunger as part of the One Family #FoodForAll campaign.

Rev. Larry Snyder, president of Catholic Charities USA, created his own cooking video as a way to build on the #FoodForAll campaign. He then sent out a challenge to others to do the same before November 27 - including a special invitation to Beckmann.

Beckmann now challenges travel writer Rick Steves, community food systems expert Sharon Thornberry – and you.  Create a cooking video or post a photo at #ShareYourPlate and on your Twitter or Facebook page. Share a virtual meal and help bring awareness to the problem of hunger.

Folllow the challengers on Twitter: @DavidBeckmann, @Fr_Larry_Snyder, @RickSteves, and  @OFB_SharonT and tag @bread4theworld with your cooking video.

Act Now: Tell Congress to Cosponsor the Global Food Security Act

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Stunting dropped an estimated 9 percent over the past three years in Ethiopia with the United States’ help through Feed the Future. An estimated 160,000 children are growing up stronger and healthier. (Nena Terrell/USAID)


By Ryan Quinn

Next week, many of us will be fortunate enough to gather around tables piled high with turkey, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pie. In expressing our gratitude for the abundance before us, we can also call to mind the role we can play in ending hunger at home and around the world.

Sometimes that means service, like volunteering in a soup kitchen. But right now we have the opportunity to make a huge difference for hungry people with one simple action: Urge your members of Congress to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act today!

Right now, more than 800 million people around the world are hungry, and approximately 1 in 4 children under age five is stunted due to poor nutrition, leaving them with serious complications that can last their entire lives.

But this problem is solvable. Tomorrow, the House Foreign Affairs Committee will vote on legislation that would dramatically reduce world hunger, and it needs your support.

The Global Food Security Act would put in place the Feed the Future framework. This is a smart approach that recognizes that, in order to end hunger, we don't just need to make more food, but we need quality, nutritious food and systems in place to get it to the people who need it most.

The Feed the Future program would work on a local level to empower small farmers, growing the local economy while feeding hungry people. A true win-win.

Feed the Future can save lives. But it's important to act right now. The bill is about to go before powerful congressional committees that can push it forward or stall it indefinitely. We need an immediate and powerful show of support. Will you speak out now?

Call (800/826-3688) or email your representative and both your senators, and urge them to cosponsor the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 5656 and S. 2909). Your advocacy today could make a lifesaving difference for a hungry child.

To learn more read, Bill Analysis: The Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Ryan Quinn is the senior international policy analyst at Bread for the World.

The Changing Story of Women

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Nimna Diayte. (Stephane Tourné/USAID)

By Robin Stephenson

The narrative of women is often a story of discrimination and marginalization. The face of poverty is disproportionately female. But as we write history, we have the power to change the story by empowering women.

New models of development show investing in women increases food security.

Programs, like Feed the Future, that make women’s capabilities a central component to agriculture and nutrition investment are yielding some impressive results: Seven million small farmers increased crop production and provided nutritious food to 12.5 million children in 2013 alone.

Nimna Diayté, a mother of six from Senegal, is one of those farmers. Diayté was barely making a living farming five acres of maize. A year later, she increased her acreage to 13 and tripled her income. Feed the Future helped create a collective so that farmers in Diayté’s community could increase their bargaining power. Diayté didn’t just benefit from the farming collective; she now leads it! Her knowledge and experience are transforming her community from one of scarcity to bounty.

She writes, “[t]he Feed the Future initiative helped us help each other, leading to the formation of a federation of some 3,000 producers who last year produced and sold 13,000 tons of corn on 5,000 hectares of land to feed our families and plan for next season.”

Bread for the World recommends Congress make Feed the Future permanent law.

In developing countries, most women work in subsistence farming. When women organize to work within groups, they are better able to overcome the gender discrimination they experience as individuals. Empowering women like Nimna Diayté as agents of change in the fight against food insecurity is the theme of the 2015 Hunger Report: When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger.

The report, which will launch November 24 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., looks at discrimination as a cause of persistent hunger and makes policy and program recommendations that would empower women both in the United States and around the world. Increasing women’s earning potential by boosting bargaining power, reducing gender inequality in unpaid work, increasing women’s political representation, and eliminating the wage gap between male and female labor directly contributes to ending hunger.

Before the turn of the 19th century, women’s work in the United States was confined to the home and was often unpaid. Women's work has long been a vital force in the U.S. economy and, with fair polices, may finally be free from entrenched and interconnected racism and sexism. With the recent elections, women's voices – a historic 100 voices in Congress - are an increasing influence in U.S. politics.

The story of women is unfinished, and the conclusion depends on what we do today. However, one thing is clear: empowering women benefits everyone.

To learn more about the 2015 Hunger Report, When Women Flourish…We Can End Hunger, read the executive summary. And join us Monday, November 24, 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM EST, as we live Tweet the launch with the hashtag  #Hunger Report.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and a senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

Bad Connections: Ebola, Fear, and Growing Hunger

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(USAID/Flickr)

By Stephen Padre

With the latest death of another Ebola patient in the United States this morning, we seem to be entering another round of media frenzy over the virus. Even though we've been through the frenzy before, the stigma around it, both here and abroad, hasn’t gone away.

The Gospel of Luke contains the story of Jesus’ encounter with ten lepers (Luke 17:11-19). In the story, Jesus commits a double social faux pas—he interacts with people with leprosy and people who were also Samaritans.

In biblical times, lepers were shunned and sent to live on the edge of town, away from everybody else. And Samaritans were those “other people,” despised by the Jews because of their heritage and practices. Both groups were to be avoided by “true” Jews. But Jesus delivered a double whammy and healed the lepers in the Samaritan neighborhood!

A similar thing has happened recently in the United States. As one example, health care workers who have traveled to West Africa to help treat patients with Ebola have come home and been stigmatized. Rather than viewing them as medical heroes, we have regarded them out of our fear of this disease. They have been portrayed as contaminated and careless, when clearly their intentions were to assist in places that do not have the means to adequately treat a deadly disease.

Jesus sets the example in his interaction with the lepers. He crossed social and health boundaries to help. While all of us can’t do something directly in West Africa like doctors, nurses, or public health professionals, we can follow Jesus’ example and pray, act, and give out of support for what others are doing to address Ebola.

For Bread for the World, the Ebola crisis is also a hunger issue. A Nov. 12 article in the Washington Post, “As Ebola takes lives in Liberia, it leaves hunger in its wake,” tells about the ripple effects of Ebola there. As people have fallen ill with Ebola, workplaces have closed, and people have been out of an income. The activities of normal life in Liberia—buying and selling food at the market, planting and harvesting on subsistence farms—have been disrupted, and hunger has reared its ugly head.

“We need assistance. We need food here in Foya,” said Joseph Gbellie, commissioner for a rural, largely agricultural district in Liberia’s northwest, quoted by the Post. “If we don’t get help, it’ll be serious, I tell you.”

The federal government is still working to address Ebola—on behalf of the American people. Last week, President Obama requested $6.2 billion in emergency funding from Congress to fight the Ebola virus in West Africa and protect the United States from its spread.

Bread supports these types of U.S. government efforts and expenditures as part of its foreign assistance. If government funds—from taxpayer dollars—can assist in halting the spread of Ebola in places like Liberia, then hunger, as part of the closely associated fallout from the disease, can also be curbed.

Stephen Padre is the managing editor at Bread for the World.

Tweet Congress: #FeedtheFuture

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Kenyan Farmer. (ACDI/VOCA)

By Robin Stephenson

Since 2010, Feed the Future programs have helped millions of farmers increase the amount of food they can grow and the the ability to feed their families. It is time to codify the program into law. With enough pressure from constituents, bills introduced in the House and Senate last month (H.R. 5656/S. 2909) could be voted on and passed during the lame-duck session. These bills would permanently authorize this comprehensive approach to global food security, ensuring the initiative continues beyond the current administration.

Learn more: Bread’s Bill Analysis: Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014.

Both bills have been introduced into committee. For H.R. 5656 and S. 2909 to move forward, the committee leadership must schedule a mark-up. Committee members then vote on the marked-up version, and if passed, the bill moves out of committee and is eligible for a floor vote.  Leadership then determines if there is sufficient momentum to pass the bill and if so, will put the bill up for a vote from the full chamber. 

Cosponsorship implies a commitment to vote in support of a bill and helps build the momentum for a floor vote.  Help us build momentum.  Look for your state, and if you have a member of Congress on one of the committees considering the Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014, click on his/her name to automatically load a tweet. If you do not have a Twitter account, email or call your representative at (800) 826-3688 and ask him/her to cosponsor H.R. 5656.  And email or call your senators, and ask them to cosponsor S. 2909. 

Senate Foreign Affairs: 113th Congress Committee Members
*members in bold have cosponsored S. 2909: Global Food Security Act of 2014

State

Majority Member

State

Minority member

New Jersey

Chairman, Robert Menendez

Tennessee

Bob Corker, Ranking Member

California

Barbara Boxer

Idaho

James Risch

Maryland

Benjamin Cardin

Florida

Marco Rubio

New Hampshire

Jeanne Shaheen

Wisconsin

Ron Johnson

Delaware

Christopher Coons        

Arizona

Jeff Flake

Illinois

Richard Durbin

Arizona

John McCain

New Mexico

Tom Udall

Wyoming

John Barrasso

Connecticut

Chris Murphy

Kentucky

Rand Paul

Virginia

Tim Kaine

 

 

Massachusetts

Edward Markey

 

 

House Committee on Foreign Affairs:  113th Congress Committee Members
*members in bold have cosponsored H.R. 5656: Feed the Future Global Food Security Act of 2014.

State

Majority Member

State

Minority Member

California

Chairman, Edward Royce

New York

Eliot Engel, Ranking Member

New Jersey

Christopher Smith

America Samoa

Eni Faleomavaega

Florida

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

California

Brad Sherman

California

Dana Rohrabacher

New York

Gregory Meeks

Ohio

Steve Chabot

New Jersey

Albio Sires

South Carolina

Joe Wilson

Virginia

Gerald Connolly

Texas

Michael McCaul

Florida

Theodore Deutch

Texas

Ted Poe

New York

Brian Higgins

Arizona

Matt Salmon

California

Karen Bass

Pennsylvania

Tom Marino

Massachusetts

William Keating

South Carolina

Jeff Duncan

Rhode Island

David Cicilline

Illinois

Adam Kinzinger

Florida

Alan Grayson

Alabama

Mo Brooks

California

Juan Vargas

Arkansas

Tom Cotton

Illinois

Bradley Schneider

California

Paul Cook

Massachusetts

Joseph Kennedy III

North Carolina

George Holding

California

Ami Bera

Texas

Randy Weber Sr.

California

Alan S. Lowenthal

Pennsylvania

Scott Perry

New York

Grace Meng

Texas

Steve Stockman

Florida

Lois Frankel

Florida

Ron DeSantis

Hawaii

Tulsi Gabbard

Georgia

Doug Collins

Texas

Joaquin Castro

North Carolina

Mark Meadows

 

 

Florida

Ted Yoho

 

 

Wisconsin

Sean Duffy

 

 

Florid

Curt Clawson

 

 

 Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

 

 

Quote of the Day: Raj Shah on Feed the Future

 

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A mother holds her child in a model home in Tigray, Ethiopia. (Nena Terrell/USAID)

"Through Feed the Future, we are harnessing the power of science, technology and innovation to unlock opportunity for the world's most vulnerable people. By creating and scaling cutting-edge solutions to our most pressing agricultural challenges, we can help the world's most vulnerable people move from dependency to self-sufficiency and out of the tragic cycle of extreme poverty."

USAID administrator Raj Shah quoted in a Nov 6, State Department press release, “U.S. Government Announces Child Stunting Rates Drop in Ethiopia, Maize Yields Increase in Zambia.”

Feed the Future programs in Zambia helped smallholder farmers increased maize production by 32 percent in one year. In the past three years, 160,00 fewer children under five in Ethiopia are malnourished because of Feed the Future and other United States Government initiatives.

Legislation that would authorize Feed the Future was introduced in Congress in September. If passed, the Global Food Security act (H.R. 5656/. S. 2909), would give the U.S. government the tools and resources it needs to better fight chronic hunger and malnutrition as well to expand and better coordinate U.S. investments in improving global food security.

Feed the Future Acts Introduced in Congress

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Feed the Future is helping increase opportunities for smallholder farmers like Alice Monigo in Uganda by providing trainings for women. (CNFA/Feed the Future)


New legislation in Congress, if passed, would give the U.S. government the tools and resources it needs to better fight chronic hunger and malnutrition as well to expand and better coordinate U.S. investments in improving global food security.

On Sept. 18, H.R. 5656 was introduced by Reps. Christopher Smith (R-N.J.) and Betty McCollum (D-Minn.) in the House. S. 2909 was introduced by Sens. Robert Casey (D-Pa.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Mike Johanns (R-Neb.), Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.), and John Boozman (R-Ark.) in the Senate. These bills would permanently codify and authorize this comprehensive approach to global food security, ensuring the initiative continues beyond the current administration.

Background

Feed the Future was created at the end of the George W. Bush administration and early in the Obama administration as the U.S.’s response to the rapid rise in global food prices that occurred from 2007 until 2009. Since its creation in 2010, Feed the Future has achieved impressive results in its 19 focus countries, helping more than seven million small farmers increase crop production and providing nutritious foods to more than 12.5 million children in 2013 alone.

While the program has been funded by Congress in annual appropriations legislation, without official authorization, the future of this program remains in the balance.

Gains for Farmers

“We are delighted to see bipartisan legislation introduced in both the House and Senate,” said Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World. “This proves that ending hunger is not a partisan endeavor but a priority that should be held by everyone.”

By authorizing Feed the Future, further gains will be made in improving the livelihoods of small-holder farmers, strengthening maternal and child nutrition, and building capacity for long-term agricultural growth. While there are differences between the House and Senate bills, they are considerably alike in purpose. Specifically, both bills would require the administration to develop a whole-of-government strategy to address global food insecurity and malnutrition. This strategy is designed to help hungry nations around the world develop smart, long-term, country-specific agriculture policies and to ensure these nations independently meet the nutrition needs of their people.

Both bills stress the importance of good nutrition, especially during the critical 1,000-day window from a woman’s pregnancy until her child’s second birthday. This helps to reduce stunting, life-long poor health, impaired cognitive and physical development, and diminished productivity. There is a strong emphasis in the bills on working with local farmers to improve their techniques, helping to stabilize food production and improve self-sufficiency.

Both bills also focus strongly on women’s economic empowerment, a significant component, considering that women are often heads of households and small-holder farmers, making them especially vulnerable to food insecurity. By further engaging women, Feed the Future aims to increase women’s farm yields and total food output and close the significant 20 to 30 percent yield gap that currently exists between male and female farmers.

“Eliminating barriers for women farmers will not only help to sustain their long-term economic prosperity, but will also help to improve their children’s nutrition, health, and lifelong potential,” added Beckmann.

This post originally appeared in Bread for the World's November online newsletter.

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