Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

248 posts categorized "Hunger in the News"

Hunger in the News: Working Poor, Progress on Global Hunger, Climate Change, Income Stagnation

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

Living On The Line: The Benefits Cliff,” by Amanda Peacher, Oregon Public Broadcasting. “This is the third in a series of stories about Oregon’s “working poor,”  people who are employed but still struggling to pay the bills. In this installment, we look at people living in poverty who find jobs and begin to earn a wage, but then face another challenge: the benefits cliff.”

World Making Progress Against Hunger, Report Finds, but Large Pockets of Undernourished Persist,” by Daniel Stone, National Geographic.  “Global access to food is improving overall, according to a report by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization released Tuesday, yet challenges in the developing world—from poor infrastructure and political instability to erratic weather and long-term changes in climate—are keeping 805 million people from having enough to eat.”

Combating climate change can be economically beneficial,” by Bob Ward, The Hill.  “A major international report published last week could be a game changer in the fierce political debate about climate change in the United States.”

Despite Declines, Child Mortality and Hunger Persist in Developing Nations, U.N. Reports,” by Rick Gladstone and Somini Sengupta, The New York Times. “The United Nations on Tuesday reported significant declines in the rates of child mortality and hunger, but said those two scourges of the developing world stubbornly persist in parts of Africa and South Asia despite major health care advances and sharply higher global food production.”

An essential guide to the midterm elections,” by John Harwood, CNBC. “Congress has done all that it will, which isn't much, before November's elections. Which means the venue for America's permanent partisan war for now shifts exclusively to the campaign trail.”

New data shows Americans' incomes still stagnant after recession,” by Jason Lange, Reuters. “In what has become a recurring theme in America's long slog back from the 2007-09 recession, most U.S. households again saw no noticeable increase in their income last year.”

Hunger in the News: Sen. Stabenow Honored, Migration and Gender Violence, South Sudan Famine, Short Session for Congress

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

Small Farm Program Paying Big Dividends,” by Jerry Hagstrom, National Journal. “Fresh from a research trip to Africa, Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow last Wednesday received the McGovern-Dole Leadership Award from the World Food Program USA, a private-sector group set up to promote the World Food Program, the United Nations agency that distributes food aid.”

Poverty: It’s More than a Job Market Story,” by Emily Cuddy, Isabel V. Sawhil,l and Richard V. Reeves, Brookings.  “We predict that there will be a gradual decline in the headline poverty rate for the foreseeable future; however, we do not expect it to return to its pre-Great Recession level by 2024 despite the fact the unemployment rate is projected to do so.”

80% Of Central American Women, Girls Are Raped Crossing Into The U.S.,” by Eleanor Goldberg, The Huffington Post. “As the number of Central American women and girls crossing into the U.S. continues to spike, so is the staggering amount of sexual violence waged against these migrants who are in search of a better life.”

Guest viewpoint: September is National Hunger Action Month,” by Andrew Morehouse, The Republican. “September is national Hunger Action Month. The Food Bank of Western Massachusetts and the entire Feeding America nationwide network of 200+ food banks have joined forces to raise awareness to fight hunger.”

South Sudan food crisis: Surviving on water lilies,” by Emmanuel Igunza, BBC. “The BBC's Emmanuel Igunza visits a South Sudanese village where people have resorted to eating water lilies, amid fears that a famine is looming.”

Congress tries to rush home for Election Day,” by Jamie Dupree, WSB News. “The U.S. Congress may have only returned to Washington, D.C. last week from a lengthy summer break, and Election Day may still be seven weeks away, but lawmakers could try to wrap up work this week in order to rush back home to campaign for the November elections.”

Voters support a path to legalization for immigrants here illegally,” by Seema Mehta, Las Angeles Times. “Though deeply concerned about the effects of illegal immigration on California, state voters broadly support a path to legalization for the nation's 12 million unauthorized residents, according to a new poll.”

US household food security fails to improve,” by Haya El Nasser, AlJazeera America. “New government report covers depth of hunger and malnutrition problems, which remain at historically high levels”

 

 

Hunger in the News: Job Market, Immigration Reform, Food Aid, Ebola Aid

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

In 2013, Workers’ Share of Income in the Corporate Sector Fell to its Lowest Point since 1950,” by Josh Bivens, Economic Policy Institute. “Labor’s share of corporate sector income seemed to be trending downward for at least a decade before the Great Recession hit.”

Job Market Continues to Grind out Gains, but at a Slower Pace,” by Gary Burtless, Brookings. The number of Americans reporting an unemployment spell lasting longer than 6 months shrank by 192,000 in August, bringing the number down to 2.96 million.

Obama aims to clarify reforms on immigration,” by Richard McGregor, The Financial Times. “Barack Obama has admitted he must convince the public of the need for immigration reform after abruptly delaying the most far-reaching changes in US policy in a quarter of a century ahead of November’s congressional elections.”

As border crisis fades, so does need for new funds,” by Seung Min Kim, Politico. “But for all the border-crisis drama that engulfed Washington this summer, lawmakers are returning to the Capitol this week from their five-week break having done nothing.”

U.S. Agency Pledges Nearly $100 Million in Ebola Aid,” by Betsy McKay, The Wall Street Journal. “The U.S. Agency for International Development said Thursday it will spend nearly $100 million in aid for the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, in what is believed to be one of the largest donations yet to combat an escalating humanitarian crisis.”

Hunger in the News: Poverty and Incarceration, Famine in South Sudan, Riding the Beast, Polling Congress

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

Why Cutting Down Jail Time is Key to Fighting Poverty,” by Julian Adler, Moyers & Company. “Many of us who work in the criminal justice system have come to understand the profound connection between poverty and mass incarceration.”

To South Sudan’s woes, add famine — 50,000 kids at risk of death,” by Ty McCormick, The Washington Post. “Nyarony Choing is as old as South Sudan. And like the world’s newest nation, she has been to hell and back before her fourth birthday.”

A Shocking Number of America’s Military Families Are Going Hungry,” by Samantha Cowan, Take Part. “Along with countless sacrifices military families make to protect the U.S., one-quarter of them struggle with food insecurity.”

Migrants risk life and limb to reach the US on train known as the Beast,” by Jo Tuckman, The Guardian. “A crackdown in Mexico is making life hard for Central American people trying to flee poverty and violence via rail to the US.”

Asians poorer than official data suggest, says ADB,” by Ben Bland, The Financial Times. “The Asian Development Bank has joined calls for a rethink of the way poverty is measured, saying the number of poor in Asia would jump more than 1bn if more realistic criteria were used.”

Religious Response to Ferguson,” Religion and Ethics Newsweekly (video). “R&E discusses the responses of religious communities with Alton Pollard III, dean of Howard University Divinity School, and Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention.”

Republicans More Focused on Immigration as Top Problem,” by Frank Newport, Gallup.  “Republicans and Republican-leaning independents are significantly more likely than Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents to say that immigration and moral decline are top problems in the U.S., while Democrats are more likely to mention poverty and education.”

Hunger in the News: Military Families and Hunger, MDG Momentum, Famine

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

More Military Families Are Relying On Food Banks And Pantries,” by Pam Fessler, NPR Morning Edition. “The survey — conducted in 2013 — found that almost 620,000 of the households using Feeding America services have at least one member currently in the military.”

“What the Rise in Food Stamps Really Means,” by Tim Henderson, The Fiscal Times. “A key indicator of economic hardship—enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps—is higher in every state than it was five years ago, even though unemployment has dropped in every state during the same period.”

“Immigration crisis at border afflicts heartland harvest,” by Ali Watkins, The Modesto Bee. “Over 20,000 U.S. farms employ more than 435,000 immigrant workers legally every year, according to 2012 U.S. Department of Agriculture census data. Thousands -probably tens of thousands - more are employed illegally.”

Ending poverty,” by Erik Solheim, Devex. “Extreme poverty has already been halved, and the Millennium Development Goals Report 2014 revealed some other stunning successes.”

“Experts are predicting a famine in South Sudan. Why can’t we stop it?” by Rick Noack, The Washington Post. “The problem is that South Sudan is following a standard pattern for these kinds of problems: The help only really arrives once it's too late.”

Watch the spread of mass incarceration throughout the US,” by Dara Lind, Vox.  “The map shows that the South — and Nevada — were leaders in increasing incarceration, but that most of the rest of the country has followed.”

Expect At Least Two Continuing Resolutions But No Shutdown This Fall,” by Stan Collender, Forbes. “Congress will return to Washington after Labor Day with little-to-no chance of enacting more than 1 or 2 (and even that’s a stretch) of the 12 regular 2015 appropriations by the time the fiscal year begins on October 1.”

 

Hunger in the News: Food Aid in Iraq, Roger Thurow Reports from Uganda, Changing Rural Poverty

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

U.S. airdrops food aid to Iraqis trapped after fleeing militants,” by Patrick J. McDonnell and David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times. “U. S. cargo planes escorted by fighter jets dropped food, water and other supplies Thursday for tens of thousands of people who fled an advance by Sunni militant fighters in northern Iraq and are stranded on a barren mountain in danger of starvation, U.S. officials said.”

India seeking amendments to subsidy as it would hit food aid,” The Economic Times.  “India today said along with the G33 countries, it is seeking an amendments to the 10 per cent subsidy cap of the WTO as it would hit the food aid programmes in the developing countries.”

Meet the Journalist: Roger Thurow Reports on the 1,000 Days,” by Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. “In northern Uganda, the mothers, who are smallholder farmers, are growing orange-flesh sweet potatoes rich in Vitamin A and a bean variety with higher iron levels.”

“Jesuits tell their alumni in Congress: Protect border children,” by David Gibson, Religion News Service. “American Jesuits are pushing members of Congress who were educated at the Catholic order’s schools to pass aid for thousands of refugee children who have surged across the border in Texas in recent months, calling proposals to swiftly deport them “inhumane and an insult to American values.”

“How rural poverty is changing: Your fate is increasingly tied to your town,” by Lydia DePillis, The Washington Post. “That’s the story of the new rural poverty in America: If your hometown went south, you probably did with it, unless you managed to get out and had the wherewithal to not come back.”

No More Hearings, No More Bills, Congress Is Headed Out for Summer,” by Becca Stanek, Time. “Especially because this is an election year, many members will be campaigning, visiting offices and town halls in their home states and holding town meetings.”

Hunger in the News: Africa Summit, World Breastfeeding Week, Poverty in America

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

“Why child migrants head to the US,” by Whitney Eulich, The Christian Science Monitor. “For many minors from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala, making a dangerous journey north outweighs the risks of staying behind.”

“Five reasons this week's Africa summit matters,” by Susan Crabtree, The Washington Examiner. “President Obama will host nearly 50 leaders of African nations in Washington early this week during the largest U.S.-African summit ever convened.”

“Relying on online listings, young Americans struggle to find jobs,” by Jana Kasperkevic, The Guardian. “The unemployment rate for younger workers, those 20 to 24 years old, including many recent college graduates, was 11.3% – five percentage points higher than the overall unemployment rate in America.”

“World Breastfeeding Week 2014: Reducing Infant Mortality With Nutrition-Packed Breast Milk,” by Anthony Rivas, Medical Daily. “World Breastfeeding Week (Aug. 1-7), however, aims to raise awareness about the power of breast milk in reducing death from these factors and others, and it’s all in hopes of achieving the United Nation’s fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG): Reducing the 1990 mortality rate among under-5 children by two-thirds by 2015. “

“Poverty in America: Why Can’t We End It?” by Peter Edelman, The New York Times (OpEd). “The first thing needed if we’re to get people out of poverty is more jobs that pay decent wages.”

“The Do-Little Congress heads home,” by Seung Min Kim and John Bresnahan, Politico. “Congress is leaving town for a five-week recess after failing to address one of the most serious issues facing the nation: the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border.”

 

Hunger in the News: UN Warns of Hunger Catastrophe, Child Poverty Rates on Rise, the Social Crisis of Mass Incarceration

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

“UN warns of ‘hunger catastrophe’ for South Sudanese children,” UN News Centre.  “Two United Nations humanitarian agencies today called for action to stop a potential famine in South Sudan which they said is being allowed to happen, just as it occurred in Somalia and the Horn of Africa three years ago.”

“From food aid to nutritious, locally produced food: A look at fortifying flour in Ethiopia,” by Jeff Dykstra, Devex. “Nutritional deficiencies during pregnancy and the first two years of life can’t be reversed, but they can be prevented.”

“Summer Program For Hungry Kids Gets Creative With Food Delivery,” by Pam Fessler, All Things Considered, NPR. “More than 21 million children get free or reduced priced meals during the school year. But in the summer, that number drops to only three million.”

“Child poverty rates on the rise,” by Hoai-Tran Bui, USA TODAY. “In its analysis of children's overall well-being, the 25th edition of the KIDS COUNT Data Book found that about 23% of children in 2012 are living in families below the poverty line.”

“Obama Presses Central American Leaders to Slow a Wave of Child Migrants,” by Michael D. Shear and Ashley Parker, New York Times.  “President Obama on Friday urged the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador to exercise what he called their “shared responsibility” to help stem the flow of migrant children toward the United States border, but the Central American leaders said America shares some of the blame for the crisis.”

“Child migrant crisis: Churches, aid workers on front lines in Central America (+video),” by Seth Robbins, The Christian Science Monitor.  “The presidents of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras meet with President Obama on the Central American crisis today. While their focus is often police and military solutions, others are seeking ways for kids to work or attend school without fear of being killed.”

“America Is Facing Its Greatest Social Crisis In Modern History,” by Matt Ford, The Atlantic, Business Insider.  “Mass incarceration on a scale almost unexampled in human history is a fundamental fact of our country today—perhaps the fundamental fact, as slavery was the fundamental fact of 1850.”

“The Cold War and its aftermath,” by John Norris, Devex. “Nixon defended foreign assistance as “essential to express and achieve our national goals in the international community — a world order of peace and justice.”

Hunger in the News: Hunger in America, Child Migration, Food Aid, and Youth Unemployment

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

“The New Faces of Hunger,” in National Geographic Magazine.  Stories from Iowa, Texas, and New York explore food insecurity in America.

“Child Migrants Have Been Coming to America Alone Since Ellis Island” by Tasneem Raja, Mother Jones.  “An unaccompanied child migrant was the first person in line on opening day of the new immigration station at Ellis Island. Her name was Annie Moore, and that day, January 1, 1892, happened to be her 15th birthday.”             

Immigration Debate: 'Welcome the Stranger' or Punish 'the Wicked'? in Interfaith Voices. Mark Tooley, president of the Institute on Religion and Democracy and Gabriel Salguero, president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition talk about the young migrants crossing the border and the nation’s estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in a radio interview.

“Who's really stalling the reform of African food aid,” by Timothy P. Carney, Washington Examiner.  “Food aid should be more about feeding hungry people and less about subsidizing U.S. business.”

“The Youth Unemployment Crisis Hits African-Americans Hardest,” NPR Morning Edition. “Though the national unemployment rate has fallen steadily in recent months, youth unemployment remains stubbornly high, and the jobless rate is even higher among young minorities.”

“Honduran child migrants leave home because of poverty and violence,” by Joshua Partlow, Washington Post.  “They are coming to America because a good job here means sewing underwear in a sweatshop for $47 a week.”

 

Hunger in the News: War on Poverty, Unaccompanied Minors, Hunger in South Sudan, and Overhauling Criminal Justice

A regular, non-comprehensive roundup of current news links on hunger and poverty issues from around the Web.

“War on poverty’ remains incomplete after half century, say advocates,” by Robert Dilday, APB News/Herald.  “Fifty years after the nation marshaled its forces to eradicate poverty, about 46 million Americans are still numbered among the poor. That has to change, say Christians engaged in the issue

“This is what happened when I drove my Mercedes to pick up food stamps,” by By Darlena Cunha, The Washington Post.  “That’s the funny thing about being poor. Everyone has an opinion on it, and everyone feels entitled to share. “

“COMMENTARY: Christians worship a child who fled violence in his home country” by Gay Clark Jennings, Religion News Service.  “The baby Jesus survived Herod’s massacre because his parents took him across a border to a land where he was safe. Just like parents in Central America who are sending their children away, Mary and Joseph took great risks so their son could survive.”

“Poverty, violence fuel exodus of youths from Honduras to U.S,” by Alfredo Corchado, Dallas News. “Like many, Maynor Serrano yearns to escape to the U.S., where he has relatives. ‘It’s tough to live without hope,’ he said. ‘If it’s not there, you go look for it.”

“Misery stalks South Sudan refugees in camps,” by Jenny Vaughan, AFP.  “Nyayoul Gach was first driven from her home in South Sudan because of violence, but escaped into Ethiopia because of hunger, unable to feed her five children who were rapidly wasting away.”

“US sending $22 million more to aid South Sudan,” by Deb Ricchmann, AP. “The U.S. announced on Thursday an additional $22 million in humanitarian assistance to refugees and people displaced by the violence in South Sudan.”

Rand Paul, Cory Booker team up for justice,” by Seung Min Kim, Politico. “The duo of high-profile, first-term senators — one a New Jersey Democrat who came to Capitol Hill on Twitter-fueled national fame, the other a Kentucky Republican mulling a presidential bid in 2016 — will roll out legislation that comprehensively overhauls the U.S. criminal justice system.”

Strong June Jobs Report Masks Woes of Long-Term Unemployed,” by Rob Garver,The Fiscal Times.  “There is one segment of the population, though, that has not been sharing equally in the gains: the long-term jobless. The share of the unemployed who have been out of work for 27 weeks or more fell to 32.8 percent, but remains extremely high by historic standards.”

“Global Poverty Levels Halved But More Africans In Extreme Poverty Than In 1990: UN Report,” by Avaneesh Pandey, International Business Times.  “While the world has managed to slash the number of poor people by half in the last 20 years, more people in sub-Saharan Africa now live in a state of extreme poverty and hunger than ever before, according to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals report published Monday.”

 

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