Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

66 posts categorized "Immigration"

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures for Parents and Children at the Border

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Catarina Pascual Jimenez (center) feeds her two twins. (Bread for the World)

By Bishop José García

The Holy Scripture relates the story of a mother, Jochebed. Hard times and a famine led her country to a condition of slavery, oppression, and persecution. Her child was under a death sentence. All of these circumstances led her to take a desperate solution. Rather than waiting for the direst of outcomes, she put the baby in a basket and placed him in the river banks, hoping this way he would have better chances for survival.  

This same story within a 21st century context is now repeated for thousands of families in Central America. Parents are facing hunger, poverty and hard times in their countries. Oppression and violence threaten their children. Many have two options: join the organized criminal gangs or die. Out of desperation these parents are doing the same thing Jochebed did, sending their children on a journey to a country where they will have better chances to live and make better choices. The Los Angeles Times reported recently that some of the children who have been deported back to their home country have lost their lives upon their return, victims of the violence they fled. It is by God’s grace only that we enjoy the freedom and privileges of our country. We cannot ignore the plight of these children and their families.

The Bible teaches that there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him(Romans 10:12). Jesus taught us that we should love our neighbor as ourselves. In a more direct admonition about the treatment of immigrants among us, Leviticus 19:33-34 says: “When an alien resides with you in your land, you shall not oppress the alien. The alien who resides with you shall be to you as the citizen among you; you shall love the alien as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt: I am the Lord your God.”

As Christians, we are called to live by the principles and values of the Kingdom of God, and to be an extension of Jesus’s love, compassion, and example of service. The Scripture admonishes us, “Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to do it” (Proverbs 3:27). We have the power to call our members of Congress to respond to this crisis in a compassionate way. And our members of Congress have the power to act with a humanitarian and dignified way to this crisis.

Will you act?

Email your members of Congress.  Simply say: I urge you to respond to the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border. Please pass legislation that addresses the conditions of poverty, hunger, and violence in Central America that are forcing them to leave.

Child Refugee Crisis of 2014: What’s in a Name?

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Ruby Galvez Roblero studies her school work at home in rural Guatemala. Her school is a direct beneficiary of USAID'S Food for Education, a program designed to help disadvantaged children perform better in school through increased nutrition (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

By Arnulfo Moreno

The border crisis: This was the overarching theme at this year’s convention for the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Specifically the conference focused on how we should be talking about this humanitarian crisis, literally what words we should be using.

We hear that the unaccompanied minors were held at immigrant detention centers, then taken to an immigration court and had an immigration hearing. Webster’s, Oxford, and Wikipedia all agree that an immigrant is a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country. Is that what these children are looking for, to live permanently in a foreign country? Is that why they left their home countries?

The ravaging effects of hunger, poverty, and violence are diminished under the term immigrant. The stunting and malnutrition that affect many of these children is concealed.   

Jonathan Ryan, executive director of RAICES (Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services), summed it up perfectly: “They are not coming here for summer camp. They are fleeing violence, seeking protection.”

A person who flees for refuge or safety is a refugee. These children aren’t coming here because they want to leave their loved ones and their countries behind. They are fleeing here because, for many, staying at home means a life of hunger, poverty, and violence. For some, it can mean certain death.

Violence, though only part of this complex issue, has played and continues to play a huge role in this recent migration. Gangs and drug cartels make more on narcotics and sex trafficking than the gross national product of many Central American countries. With this type of power comes the ability to oppress and terrorize. Until the situation in these countries improves, are we supposed to turn our backs on these child refugees just because they are not fleeing organized government oppression but instead organized crime? Should we wait until these crime syndicates declare themselves a government and come clean about the violence they are inflicting on these children?

Hopefully we can acknowledge these children as refugees and not downplay the reality that faces them. I can think of an even better label for these unaccompanied minors: human beings.

Learn more about the Child Regugee Crisis of 2014 here:  www.bread.org/indistrict

Arnulfo Moreno is the media relations specialist at Bread for the World.

With Child Refugees, Who Are Members of Congress Listening To?

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Legislation passed Friday, August 8, in the House of Representatives revises a 2008 anti-trafficking law. Bread for the World strongly opposes repeals of the key anti-trafficking law that would deny Central American child migrants the right to adjudication before an immigration judge and due process protections.

Former Bread for the World Hunger Justice Leader Leani Garcia wrote about this bill, “Who Are Christian Congressmen Listening To?” for Americas Quarterly. Following is an excerpt.

The Congressional Research Service has reported that between 87 and 89.8 percent members of U.S. Congress self-identify as Christian. The House members who voted for Friday’s immigration bills run the gamut of American Christian affiliations. There were members of mainline protestant groups like Episcopalians, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, and Lutherans; more conservative Christians like Southern Baptists, Assemblies of God and Church of God members, and non-denominational Christians; many Catholics, some Eastern Orthodox members, and even a few Mormons and Christian Scientists. …

Shouldn’t our representatives, at the very least, pay lip service to their Christian duty to love thy neighbor when they discuss the fate of these children? The fact that many of them can’t bring themselves to even refer to the children as refugees, or accept that violence, sky-high murder rates, and social exclusion—not DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals]—are the primary drivers of the surge, speaks volumes.

The Bible says not to mistreat or withhold justice from a foreigner six times in Exodus, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Jeremiah, and Zechariah. The Bible even goes so far as to say that the foreigner should be considered native-born, and that anyone who deprives or withholds justice from the foreigner will be swiftly judged and cursed. And just in case the Old Testament isn’t really your thing, both Matthew and Hebrews mention inviting in and showing hospitality to the stranger. Feeling especially protective of your citizenship? Philippians 3:20 tells Christians that their citizenship is in Heaven—no mention of the U.S. there.

But don’t just take my word for it. Christian umbrella organizations made up of members from various denominations—such as Church World Service, Bread for the World and Esperanza USA—as well as individual denominations widely represented in Congress—such as the Catholic Church (through the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops), the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), the Episcopal Church, and the United Methodist Church—have been calling for a humanitarian approach to comprehensive immigration reform for years. Even traditionally conservative denominations have been pushing for reform through coalitions such as the Evangelical Immigration Table, Bible, Badges and Business, the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference and even the Southern Baptist Convention—organizing prayer events, press releases and lobbying members of Congress.

American faith leaders of all stripes feel so strongly about deportations and immigration reform that 112 were arrested for civil disobedience when they protested in front of the White House on July 31.

While the overwhelming majority of members of Congress who voted for the restrictive bills last Friday may think they have nothing to lose in this midterm election, they should at least consider the long-term consequences of alienating Latino and Asian voters when determining their political platform.

And even if a long-term outreach strategy doesn’t factor into their political calculus, their actions beg the question: if the members of Congress who pride themselves on being Christians are not listening to the American people (including their constituents, such as the 59 percent of Tea Party Republicans who favor a path to citizenship), their faith leaders, or even their own holy book, who exactly are they listening to?

To find out more about Immigration Reform and Unaccompanied Children, please visit: http://www.bread.org/what-we-do/resources/toolkits/in-district-meetings/

Border Eyewitness

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Poverty, hunger, and violence have caused a surge in child migration to the United States from countries like Guatemala, which has the highest child malnutrition rate in the Western Hemisphere. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Ricardo Moreno

It is one thing to hear the media reports, and another thing to witness what is happening with the unaccompanied children arriving from Central America. I recently visited the city of Murrieta, California, where a Border Patrol station was processing children who had arrived on buses from the Rio Grande Valley, where they crossed into the United States. Regardless of the politics of the issue, it was heartbreaking to witness the hate and visceral reactions of some individuals and groups. I saw a group of 50 people holding signs saying, “We don’t want diseases” and, “Stop the invasion.” This was right after two buses brought refugee children from Texas to Murrieta.

It made me question people’s hearts and humanity. I could not understand such hatred toward children. Children are the most vulnerable people. They did not choose where they were born, their neighborhoods, or their families. No matter where someone is on the political spectrum, how can they demonstrate this level of hate toward children?

These are children who are frightened. Their ages range from two years old to seventeen years old and everything in between. As a father, I cannot imagine my 14-year-old son or my 10-year-old daughter making the trip from Guatemala or El Salvador. But the reality is that this is not new. For many, as with the new child migrants, America represents an escape from hunger, poverty, and violence.  

Contrary to the hateful responses that we see in the media, many churches have responded with compassion and care for these child migrants. Here in Los Angeles, Roman Catholic churches were the first to respond. The Bishop of the Diocese of San Bernardino publicly asked his parishioners to welcome the children. In my own neighborhood, the Saint Joseph Catholic Church opened its doors to host 56 children. They made sure that these children have access to food, clothes, beds, and showers. Two days later, the United Methodist Church and the Episcopal Church took a really active role. Now many churches are also responding.

As we respond to the needs of child migrants, I am reminded of the very first victory we achieved as Bread for the World. In 1975, we convinced Congress to pass a historic resolution saying that every person has a right to food, even migrant children.  We need to treat today’s migrant children with love and compassion. They are children of God, God’s own creation. Jesus said, “Let the children come to me.” May we work together with our brothers and sisters to meet our goals of writing hunger into history.

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Fact Sheet: The Child Refugee Crisis of 2014

Ricardo Moreno is Bread for the World’s associate for Latino relations.

This post originally appeared in Bread for the World's August online newsletter.

They Are Our Children

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Poverty, hunger, and violence have caused a surge in child migration to the United States from countries like Guatemala, which has the highest child malnutrition rate in the Western Hemisphere. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Rev. Carlos L. Malavé

The most important responsibility of the Church is to promote, nurture, and protect human life and dignity. When the Church relinquishes this duty because of political expediency, or even in defense of its theological and ideological convictions, it loses its moral grounding and credibility.

The Church is called to be the most unequivocal expression of the heart and conscience of Christ. The way we respond to the cries of the children of God either affirms our legitimacy or exposes our failure. Our allegiance is not to the political, theological, or sociological winds of the time. Our allegiance is to the one who will call us into account when the last act of the human drama wraps up.

Every follower of Christ, every minister, and every local congregation must offer refuge to those seeking freedom, healing, and salvation. Our ears cannot become deaf to the words of Jesus: “Because you did it unto one of these little ones, you have done it unto me.”

In an introduction to a published sermon of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “The American Dream,” Bishop T.D. Jakes, Sr. says, “It would appear to me that in many ways our country has lowered its head into the soft satiny pillow of apathy. We have been lulled to sleep by indifference and rest in the vain pursuit of economical images of success while a stone’s throw away there are children dying in the streets” (A Knock at Midnight, p. 79).

There are children dying in the streets of Chicago and Philadelphia, and there are also children dying in the Sonoran Desert and the Rio Grande. They are our children. They are our children because we are one human family. The children of Salvadorian, Honduran, and Guatemalan families are as human and as important as my own three children. How can anyone think that their own children have the right to live in peace and security while denying this same right to others?

Pastors and members of our congregations must guard their souls from apathy and the callousness that pervade our political and economic systems. We are called to be Christ to all, but in a very intentional and biased way, we must be Christ to destitute, hungry, and oppressed people. Our actions, care, and concern for poor people reveal the presence or absence of the living Christ in us.

The Church in the United States must seize this incredible opportunity. We are followers of the one who said, “Let the children come to me…” (Luke 18:16). How do we dare to send them away? The Church is responsible before God’s eyes to live—or even to die—in the pursuit and defense of human live and dignity. Christ is in the journey with our children. Christ is a witness of our actions. Christ is also calling us.

Rev. Carlos L. Malavé is the executive director of Christian Churches Together, an ecumenical organization that brings together a wide variety of denominations and organizations to build relationships with each other. Bread for the World is a participating organization.

This post originally appeared in Bread for the World's August online newsletter

At the White House, Faith Leaders Protest Deportation of Unaccompanied Children

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Bishop Minerva Carcaño of the United Methodist Church (pictured at left) prepares to march with other faith leaders to be arrested in front of the White House. (Kimberly Burge)

By Kimberly Burge

To the sound of bilingual chanting—“Si, se puede!  Yes, we can!”—hundreds of people of faith joined together on last Thursday in Lafayette Park across from the White House to protest the deportation of unaccompanied children back to Central America. After a short prayer service, 130 faith leaders and activists marched forward in an act of civil disobedience to draw attention to these deportations, asking President Obama to halt them immediately.

“The shame of this country needs to stop,” Bishop Minerva Carcaño of the United Methodist Church said to those gathered in the park. “We’re not hearing a moral voice coming from the White House or Congress on this issue. Someone needs to be a moral voice. We’re here to do that, and we’re asking President Obama and Congress to join with us.”

Rev. John McCullough, CEO and president of Church World Service, said, “We come together to pray for the president to loosen the bonds of injustice and let the oppressed go free. Too many families have been separated. Too many tears have been shed for these unjust laws. We pray for the children escaping violence and poverty in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  We pray for President Obama, that he will be brave and act boldly.”

Before she marched forward to be arrested, Judy Coode, communications director for the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, explained why she was willing to take this action.

“Hospitality is a requirement of our faith. I’m from a big family and we understood that there was always room for one more. Knowing what we know about the realities of life in these countries, it’s inhumane to send anyone, especially children, back to that situation.”

Sponsors of the rally included the United Methodist Church, Church World Service, CASA de Maryland, Bend the Arc, the Unitarian Universalists Association, the United Church of Christ, Sisters of Mercy, Disciples Home Missions of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the PICO National Network, and the Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns.

Bread for the World continues to urge Congress to address the hunger, poverty, and violence driving migration to the United States. Bread members called senators last week urging them to pass a supplemental funding bill, which included $300 million for the State Department to help address the root causes. The Senate bill was postponed and legislators left for a five-week summer recess without acting. House lawmakers passed a $694 million border bill late Friday. The supplemental appropriations bill did not include funds to address hunger and poverty in Central America. Further, legislation passed Friday in the House revises a 2008 anti-trafficking law. Bread for the World strongly opposes repeals of the key anti-trafficking law that would deny Central American child migrants the right to adjudication before an immigration judge and due process protections.

To find out more about Immigration Reform and Unaccompanied Children, please visit: http://www.bread.org/hunger/immigration/

Kimberly Burge is the interim associate online editor for Bread for the World.

A Migrant’s Tale: Not From Here nor From There

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Arnulfo and his mother.  (Courtesy Arnulfo Moreno)


By Arnulfo Moreno

“This is to certify that on the 15th of June there was born a girl named Ana Maria Canata.” As I look at my mom’s birth certificate, I know she understands that feeling of never belonging.

My grandmother, my mother’s mother, Pillar Sanchez, didn’t have a normal childhood. Spain had been ravaged by a civil war while she was a teenager. Families were torn apart, children lost their parents or were shipped overseas against their will. Pillar had been forced, as many young women were, to work at makeshift hospitals, cleaning bandages, assisting in amputations, and sweeping up the pieces of soldiers that littered the floor.

Soon after the war was over she managed to get work at the Spanish embassy as “the help,” cooking, cleaning, sewing, whatever was needed. In 1945, she was brought over to the United States by a group of ambassadors. Despite the change of scenery, Pillar’s life stayed the same. Since she did not speak English and since the embassy kept her passport under lock and key, she did not have much contact with the outside world.

Fate intervened. My grandmother met my grandfather, Adalberto Canata, at an embassy banquet. Adalberto was the military attaché for Paraguay and a West Point graduate. Pillar was an embassy servant. As she was setting the table for the banquet, he fell in love.

Six months later they were married and shortly after had my mom. Life was good. Then in 1954, Alfredo Stroessner took power in Paraguay and declared himself dictator. My grandfather was going to lead a coup and wanted to take Pillar and my mother with him. Pillar had seen enough war for a lifetime and didn’t want my mom to go through that, so they stayed in DC while my grandfather left for Paraguay. The coup failed but my grandfather’s popularity in Paraguay prevented Stroessner from killing him. Adalberto would spend the rest of his life under house arrest. Pillar would never see him again.

Pillar was now an immigrant single mother working in the United States. Despite how hard she worked, she could not adequately care for my mom, so she sent her to Spain with another embassy worker. My mom was 2 years old. The worker told Pillar that little Ana Maria cried almost the entire time she was on the plane. My mother still has a fear of airplanes.

My grandmother would send for my mother many times but would then have to send her back to Spain to live with her family due to economic conditions. This instability in my mom’s life made it hard for her to have roots in Spain or in the United States either one. At age 23, my mother finally decided to stay in the United States. Even though she was born a citizen, she has always felt like a foreigner. Here she met my father, Jose Arnulfo Moreno, himself an immigrant from El Salvador. Here they raised their family.

Pillar eventually saved enough money and retired in Spain. My mom would visit her there and Adalberto in Paraguay. I only met them when I was a year old. They have both since passed away.

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Arnulfo recently wrote about hunger and poverty as the motivation for his father’s journey to the United States. Migration stories are usually more complex than we assume. Today,  hunger, poverty, and violence are the root causes driving children and their families to flee Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. You can help change the narrative. 

Call (800-826-3688) or email your U.S. representative and your U.S. senators! Simply say: I urge you to respond to the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border. Please pass legislation that addresses the conditions of poverty, hunger, and violence in Central America that are forcing them to leave.

Arnulfo Moreno is the media relations specialist at Bread for the World.

 

Elections and Building the Political Will to End Hunger

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Bread for the World member Derick Daily talks about hunger and poverty with staff of Sen. Mark Pryor (D-Ark), in Washington D.C., on June 10, 2014. (Rick Reinhard)

By Robin Stephenson

Members of Congress will leave behind a lot of unfinished business when they head to their home states and districts for August recess at the end of the week. Anti-hunger advocates should send them back to Washington, D.C., in November with clear orders to get to work on ending hunger.

This is an election year and all 435 members of the House and 33 senators are running for reelection. There will be many public events where anti-hunger advocates can talk to their elected or soon-to-be elected officials about hunger and poverty.  Bread for the World has created a set of resources to help advocates start a conversation. These  include a guide to speaking up about hunger at Town Halls and updated voting records so you know how your members of Congress have voted on issues of hunger and poverty.

If outgoing House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s stunning loss earlier this year taught elected officials anything, it’s that they can’t ignore district concerns. Bread wants to help end hunger by 2030. To do that, we need to help build the political will to make hunger a national priority by 2017.  “All politics are local,” said Bread for the World’s director of government relations Eric Mitchell during last month’s national webinar and conference call.  “There won't be pressure to change anything unless they hear from local constituents.” And there is plenty to talk about.

The United States is poised to make huge strides in improving food aid that does more than just feed people in a crisis but helps build resilience so they can weather the next storm. Urging lawmakers to cosponsor The Food for Peace Reform Act (S. 2421) will help build the political will to reform U.S. food aid. Furthermore, Congress should be reminded that faithful advocates oppose provisions that would decrease food aid by increasing transportation costs by shipping more food from the United States.

At public events, we must get members of Congress talking about how they will address the root causes that are driving millions of children to flee Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras. Lawmakers are focused on the border between the United States and Mexico and not on the source of the problem. Congress should allocate funds in the 2015 budget for programs that can help alleviate hunger and poverty in Central America. However, appropriators are proposing to cut poverty-focused development assistance.

Recent data reports the job market is finally improving, yet more than 3 million long-term unemployed are left without emergency unemployment benefits. The end of the recession has not reached all Americans. Safety net programs to alleviate hunger for low-income families are still the first items on the chopping block. Prioritizing a jobs agenda will make ending hunger in America possible.

“We are not advocating electing one party or another,” said director of organizing LaVida Davis. “As people of faith, our task is to change the conversation and make ending hunger a priority for our elected officials.”

Hunger affects all of us. Making hunger an election issue is how we can build the political will to end it.

Robin Stephenson is the national lead for social media and senior organizer in the western hub.

Action Alert: Senate Voting Tomorrow on Unaccompanied Children


Poverty, hunger, and violence have caused a surge in child migration to the United States from countries like Guatemala, which has the highest child malnutrition rate in the Western Hemisphere. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Arnulfo Moreno

My papa, Jose Arnulfo Moreno Machado, left El Salvador to escape the violence during the civil war, and to search for a better opportunity to provide for his mother and younger siblings. He was an unaccompanied child when he crossed Central America into the United States. Today the civil war has ended but violence continues to ravage my father's homeland due to gangs, the drug trade, hunger, and poverty. Tens of thousands of unaccompanied children, just like my dad years ago, are again making the perilous trip to the United States.

The Senate is about to vote on a bill to help address the crisis of unaccompanied children crossing the U.S. border. This bill, S. 2648, includes $300 million for the State Department to help address the root causes that drive these children to flee their home countries, including hunger, poverty, and violence.

Call (800-826-3688) or email your U.S. senators in the next 48 hours and urge them to pass S. 2648, the emergency supplemental bill. The vote could be as early as tomorrow, and unfortunately, we still don't have the votes to pass it.

Can you take a couple minutes right now to urge your U.S. senators to vote yes on S. 2648?

There’s not much time! Congress has until Friday before they leave town for the August recess. The situation is urgent. Please call 1-800-826-3688 or email now.


Arnulfo Moreno is the media relations specialist at Bread for the World.

Seeing Hunger - and Christ - on Children's Faces in Guatemala


Last year Bread's multimedia manager Joseph Molieri travelled to Guatemala where he saw hunger and solutions to hunger up close. He filmed Catarina Pascual Jimenez,and tells her story in the short video, Food for the Future.

By Joseph Molieri

Reading the news stories of a surge in child migration from Guatemala does not surprise me. Last year I was there, and I saw the devastation that hunger can cause. 

In Guatemala City, the street life is alive with the calls of vendors selling their wares, congested streets, and bustling pedestrians. I took a taxi to a rural region just north of Huehuetenango, about a 200-mile drive from Guatemala City, where life was slower but harder. We had come to Guatemala to observe the impact of food-security programs, which are partially funded through grants from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and to gather stories for Bread’s Offering of Letters in these western highlands of Guatemala. 

As we traveled farther into the countryside, a palpable feeling of coldness grew stronger.  About halfway into the trip, we pulled over and got out to stretch for a few minutes. The indigenous locals walking by glanced nervously at us before pulling their children to the other side of the road. Roberto, my driver, said this area saw a lot of fighting during the civil war. I knew this, but I was only beginning to see and feel it. 

For many years, the indigenous Mayan population in Guatemala has lived in extreme poverty, exacerbated by a political system at times designed to disenfranchise them.  The Mayans have also experienced exclusion from development and wealth. Guatemala has made headlines in recent weeks as the country with the worst malnutrition in the Western Hemisphere and one of the hotspots where children are leaving to migrate to the United States. During my visit, I began to get a glimpse of why this might be.

At our destination I met Catarina Pascual Jimenez, a mother of four children. Her oldest son, Antonio, now 17, left when he was 15 to work as a migrant laborer. Opportunities and access to nutritious food are severely limited in her remote village. Her youngest children, Roni and Shelia, given their age at 17 months, would become two more statistics of malnourishment and stunting without the USAID program.

As we met with more mothers, we heard similar stories. These women and children had a small opportunity to overcome hunger because of the USAID nutrition program. However, for this one village with the program, there were countless more without it, where children might suffer all their lives as a result of malnutrition.  The issues these women face, like many others in Latin America, are not isolated incidents of a poor economy but rather the result from years of political unrest, bad policies both from their own government as well as neighboring countries, and racial discrimination. 

Matthew 25 asks me when I saw Christ hungry. I saw hunger in Guatemala.  I also saw that when we invest in programs and give people a hand up, we not only live out the Gospel call to “do for one of the least of these” but we alleviate conditions that cause people to migrate for survival. I called my member of Congress, and I invite you to join me.  Children like those I met are desperate and coming to the United States on dangerous journeys because they are hungry. We cannot turn our back on them. What we can do is try to change the circumstances they are fleeing.

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Call (800-826-3688) or email your U.S. representative and your U.S. senators! Simply say: I urge you to respond to the surge of unaccompanied children crossing the border. Please pass legislation that addresses the conditions of poverty, hunger, and violence in Central America that are forcing them to leave.

Joseph Molieri is the multimedia manager at Bread for the World

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