Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

56 posts categorized "Immigration"

Give Boehner Some Motherly Advice: Keep Families Together

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In a protest, Renata Teodoro, right, and her mother, Gorete Borges Teodoro, who was deported in 2007, reunite at a Mexican border fence in Nogales, Ariz. (Samantha Sais for the New York Times)

By Rosa

There are many people who can’t always spend Mother’s Day with their moms, for different reasons.  In my case, visiting my mother means risking my family’s financial stability and possibly never returning to the country, the friends, or the job that I love.

I am one of the 12 million people who live in the United States without documentation. I left Tegucigalpa, Honduras, in 2002, seeking a better life. I’ve worked hard since coming here. I’ve held the same job for years, I’m active in my church, I volunteer in my community, and I’ve earned a high school diploma. Still, I live in constant fear of being deported.

Because of my status, leaving the country to visit my mother could mean never returning to the United States. So this Mother’s Day, for the eleventh year in a row, I won’t see my mom. I’ll only call her and tell her I wish we could spend the day together.

As you prepare to honor your mother in a few days, please stand with me and add your name to Bread for the World’s Mother’s Day card to Speaker John Boehner, which asks him to bring an immigration reform bill to a vote in the House of Representatives. Bread for the World staffers will deliver the card to Boehner’s office and urge him to work with his colleagues to fix this country’s broken immigration system and stop tearing families apart.

My story is not unique. I know mothers who’ve come to the United States to earn a living and must leave their children with relatives, and others who have watched their own children leave for the U.S., never getting to see them grow up. At home there are very few jobs and little opportunity. The money I’ve been able to send home helps feed, clothe, and house my parents, my brother and sister, and my nieces and nephews. Without it, I don’t know what would happen to them. When I hear people say unkind things about undocumented immigrants, I wonder if they would let their families suffer or starve if put in the same position.

My faith in God, my faith in Congress to do the right thing, and my faith in people to speak out lead me to believe we can pass comprehensive immigration reform now. People who live in fear of being separated from their brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, fathers, and mothers—or of never seeing them again—cannot wait.

Rosa is one of 12 million U.S. residents living in this country without documentation.

Click here for a Spanish-language version of Rosa's story and the petition to Speaker Boehner.

Policy Focus: House Must Act on Immigration Reform

With one-third of unauthorized immigrants living in poverty and reports showing that legalization and citizenship would increase immigrants' earnings 13 percent or more, immigration reform is an important hunger issue. Moreover, the biblical mandate to "welcome the stranger" implores us as Christians to seek reform of our country's immigration system. The Hebrew word for immigrant — ger — appears 92 times in the Bible.

It has been nearly a year since the Senate passed S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act. Despite widespread support for advancing some sort of immigration reform, the House has yet to act as a whole. However, significant movement has taken place behind the scenes.

The Senate passed one large comprehensive immigration bill, but the House decided to take a piecemeal approach, opting instead to pass a number of separate bills dealing with different aspects of our immigration system. The House Judiciary Committee has passed five bordersecurity measures. More importantly, three other bills lie in the wings as representatives negotiate final details and prepare for the proper moment to introduce their legislation. These bills focus on granting citizenship to DREAMERS (undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as young children by their parents or relatives and who have lived most of their lives here), providing a path to legalization for the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the U.S., and addressing low-skilled workers.

For Congress to carry out comprehensive immigration reforms, the House must act. The votes exist. Speaker John Boehner needs only to bring legislation to the floor of the House for a vote. Many House Republicans, including many within the leadership, have made strong statements indicating their support for passing reforms this year.

There are two periods when immigration reform has its best chance of passing out of the House: the next couple of months and early this fall. A number of House Republicans wanted to delay voting for reforms, scared off by potential primary challengers. Now that the primaries are ending, a short window of opportunity exists before the August recess. Another short window of opportunity exists in September, after the August recess but before members return to their districts for the final campaign spree before the November elections.

Members of Congress must feel political pressure to act. They must feel there is a political cost in their November elections if they are seen as not acting on immigration reform. This is not a question of policy. It is a question of politics and members hearing from their constituents. Members of Congress need to be going to leadership, urging them to bring immigration bills up for a vote in the House because they are feeling too much pressure back home not to do so.

During Bread's 2014 Lobby Day (June 10 — see Bread Slices for more information), we will be increasing this pressure. One of the "asks" or topics during Lobby Day will be urging House members to press for votes on immigration reform, primarily those bills that will have a measurable impact in reducing hunger.

Photo: Advocates gather in front of the U.S. Capitol on June 27, 2013, to pray for compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

[This article originally appeared in the May 2014 edition of Bread for the World's e-newsletter.]

Immigration Policy: Is Federalism the Answer?

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As immigration reform remains stuck in Congress, local and state proposals are gaining traction, for better or for worse. Here, demonstrators gathered at immigration reform rally held in Los Angeles on Feb. 22, 2014. (Ricardo Moreno)

[This article originally appeared in the National Journal, on April 21.]

By Andrew Wainer and Audrey Singer

For those of us tracking immigration policy, the shift is undeniable. With President Obama recently pointing out just how gridlocked a once-promising bipartisan Senate immigration proposal has become, cities and states have become the new immigration-policy innovators. They are filling the void.

U.S. immigration policy has been the purview of the federal government for more than a century. But it was not always that way. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, individual states had their own immigration laws. States typically sought to regulate immigrant influxes with policies that reflected particular concern about the arrival of poor European newcomers. Now, immigration policy is, in some ways, returning to its roots.

Increasingly, places that want to put out the welcome mat and encourage entrepreneurial activity are sharing ideas. And as a quick federal fix to immigration policy looks like a long shot, local and state proposals are gaining traction.

Continue reading "Immigration Policy: Is Federalism the Answer? " »

Resurrecting Immigration Reform in an Election Year

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Gabriel and Jeanette Salguero, pastors at The Lamb’s Church in New York City, spoke at Bread for the World’s 2011 Gathering at American University on Sunday, June 12, 2011. (Rick Reinhard)

“Our broken immigration system is breaking apart families,” Rev. Gabriel Salguero told listeners during the April 15 national grassroots conference call and webinar.

Rev. Salguero stressed that it is urgent that the House of Representatives take up–and pass–immigration reform this year. Salguero, a leading voice in the call to reform U.S. immigration policy, is president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition (NaLEC). 

Bread for the World believes immigration reform will reduce hunger and poverty. We ask Bread advocates to urge their representatives to pass legislation this year. The Senate has already passed a bill, but legislation continues to stall in the House.

“Inaction is not an option,” Rev. Salguero told advocates. Outdated immigration policy leaves millions of undocumented people in the shadows, where hunger and poverty persists. Roughly a third of the estimated 11 to 12 million people living and working in the United States without documentation live below the poverty line. Deportations rip families apart. DREAMers–the 1.8 million young people brought to the United States as children–live in fear of being banished from the country that is their home.

Addressing the likelihood of moving an immigration bill during an election year, Salguero noted that the last time immigration legislation passed, there were midterm elections.  However, advocates must build the momentum for action.  “We use leverage at the local level – such as town hall meetings,” said Salguero, “Tell Congress the faith community wants a vote.”

When Congress returns from the Easter recess next week, there are several urgent issues that need attention in order for progress to be made in the exodus from hunger: budget appropriations, an unemployment extension, a minimum wage bill, food-aid reform, and immigration reform should all be given high priority by leadership. 

In June, immigration reform will take center stage at this year’s National Gathering. Presenters include Rev. Salguero and immigration-rights leader Gaby Pacheco. Attendees to the Washington D.C. conference will also spend a day on Capitol Hill telling lawmakers that immigration reform is the moral thing to do and the time to act is now.

A conversation about immigration reform and inaction by Congress so close to Easter had particular poignancy to Rev. Salguero, who told webinar participants, “It is time to resurrect the conversation about immigration reform.”

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On the third Tuesday of each month, in an effort to best serve our grassroots and give them a legislative update, the organizing and government relations departments at Bread for the World host a conference call and webinar. The next call will take place on May 13.

Immigration Reform: "Government Can Solve This"

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Marvin Garcia Salas eats breakfast with his son Jesus, 4, in Chiapas, Mexico. Marvin was once an undocumented immigrant in the United States, where he had moved without his family to better support them. Hunger, and a lack of economic opportunity are at the root of much of the undocumented immigration from Mexico. (Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World)

"Twelve million people living and working in our country… and there’s no sane path toward citizenship for these 12 million undocumented workers… It’s impossible to deport 12 million people. No one wants to rip families apart, and that’s what would happen with a massive deportation…
 
I have determined, adding more compassion isn’t going to solve it, doing more justice [in the sense of hiring attorneys] isn’t going to solve it, only the government can solve this at this point. So for the first time in my ministry, I’ve been writing op-ed pieces in major newspapers, I’ve gone to Washington to visit the offices of Republicans and Democrats. I’ve stood on the Capitol lawn with dozens of others leaders, doing press conferences, asking for our elected officials to come up with Comprehensive Immigration Reform—because it’s their job, it’s why we elected them, it’s their problem to resolve..."
 
—Willow Creek Community Church Senior Pastor Bill Hybels, in a Celebration of Hope message on Sunday, April 13, 2014
 
In Matthew 25, Jesus says, "I was a stranger and you welcomed me ... ." Immigration is an issue related to hunger and is part of the biblical call. As Bill Hybels notes, advocating for immigration reform is a way to answer that call today.
 
Join Bread for the World tomorrow, Tuesday, April 15, for a special webinar/conference call: A Faithful Approach to Reforming a Broken System, Conversations on Immigration with Rev. Gabriel Salguero and Ivone Guillen.
 
Rev. Gabriel Salguero — president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition and a former Bread board member — is a leading voice within the immigration reform movement. Ivone Guillen is the Immigration Associate at Sojourners and former immigration policy fellow at Bread for the World.
 
They will be discussing these questions: What are the prospects for immigration reform this year? How can you make a difference? Why are Bread members so critical in pushing immigration reform as a hunger issue?
 
They will also address the biblical support for immigration reform and discuss how you can pressure legislators to act. We will present new fact sheets that will help you in your advocacy efforts. Bread for the World firmly believes that immigration reform will reduce poverty and hunger.
 
Submit your questions ahead of time to organizing coordinator Marion Jasin at mjasin@bread.org. Check out our comprehensive how-to guide on the webinar conference call and register today.

Pray for a Hungry "Stranger"

Woman prays"Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me..."

                                          —Mathew 25:34-35

Immigration is a hunger issue. Our broken immigration system in the United States leaves too many without access to resources they need to live. Poverty and hunger have been major forces driving immigration to this country; for those who live here as undocumented immigrants, their status means a precarious life in the shadows.

Immigration reform is part of the exodus from hunger for which Bread for the World members advocate and pray. Yet, as legislation to reform immigration languishes and the House of Representatives fails to act, frustration on the part of advocates mounts and people continue to suffer. A Christian response requires us to use our voices and advocate for our brothers and sisters both here and abroad, but a faithful response to hunger also includes prayer. 

Today, we join with our partners in the Evangelical Immigration Table, and other people of faith, in praying for our leaders in Congress, the congregations and pastors who care for immigrants and their families, and for the millions of people hurt by an outdated immigration system.

Take a moment during your day, or at any point over the next 24 hours, and pray for those who hunger for reform. Use the prayer below or one of your own choosing. Ask other in your church, campus, or community to join you, and help make this day of prayer a powerful one that moves hearts and minds. If you are a Twitter user, ask others to join you in prayer and action by using the hashtag #Pray4Reform.

All things are possible through Christ who strengthens us.


Prayer for a Hungry "Stranger"

Lord Jesus Christ, Giver of abundant love,
guidance and protection,
our hearts are filled with gratitude.
Your love empowers us to do your will,
to be your hands and feet in this world,
for your purpose.
Your grace enables us to recognize injustice
and to partner in the restoration of brokenness in our
own lives and of unjust systems.
There is hunger and poverty in our world
that displaces our brothers and sisters from their homes and homelands.
Lord Jesus, we seek your shelter and protection.
Migrant workers harvest the food on our tables yet suffer
unsafe labor conditions and empty cupboards.
Lord Jesus, we imagine your harvest
to be rich and plentiful for all people
and that all people are fed and have a place at the table.
The decisions of lawmakers in this nation impact
the flourishing of millions children created in your image.
Lord Jesus, may we witness a change in this nation’s priorities so that
hunger is no longer acceptable.  
May we see the dignity
of every person upheld, especially their right to food.
Lord Jesus, may we be strengthened by your example
to welcome the stranger, love our neighbor and feed the hungry
so that our brothers and sisters everywhere will flourish.

—Krisanne Vaillancourt-Murphy

 

Photo: A woman prays during a worship service in Guatemala. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

Immigration Reform Update: Reform in 2014 in Limbo

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Demonstrators gathered at immigration reform rally in Los Angeles on Feb. 22, 2014. (Ricardo Moreno)

The prospects for immigration reform in 2014 were diminished in recent days when House Speaker John Boehner questioned whether an immigration bill could pass the House, due to Republicans’ “widespread doubt about whether this administration can be trusted to enforce our laws.” Rep. Boehner added, “It's going to be difficult to move any immigration legislation until that changes.”

After raising advocates’ hopes for reform this year with the release of House Republican principles for reform, Rep. Boehner’s comments put the short-term viability of immigration reform in limbo. Still, advocates continue to push for reform, both with Congress and the administration. Boehner’s apparent call for delaying immigration reform hasn’t prevented other Republican leaders and constituencies at the local, state, and national levels to continue to push for updating the nation’s outdated immigration system.

During a meeting with the National Governors’ Association in Washington, D.C., Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said, "I'm a Republican and I'm happy to help lead the charge to say, 'Let's embrace immigration.'" Snyder described himself as being “probably among the most pro-immigration governors in the country."

In Congress, many of Boehner’s colleagues, including Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart are reportedly working on legislation that will meet a majority of Republican representatives’ doubts regarding enforcing immigration provisions. Rep. Diaz-Balart also said it would meet many Democratic congressional members’ requirements. “Can you draft legislation that has serious border and interior security, with sufficient leverage to force this or future administrations?” Rep. Diaz-Balart said. “I think we have drafted a way to actually do that.”

Major Republican constituencies have also stepped up their pressure on Congress to bring immigration reform legislation to the House floor this year. U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue re-emphasized the economic need for immigration stating, “The case for immigration reform is clear. The need is undeniable. The time is now.” Donohue’s statement was followed by a multi-industry letter on immigration reform signed by 636 businesses. “Failure to act is not an option,” the letter stated.  

Faith-based groups across the political spectrum also continue to lead the push for reform. Catholic and evangelical Christian leaders united to urge Congress “to move forward and create a new immigration process.” Leaders participating in the call urging Congress to act included National Association of Evangelicals President Leith Anderson, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference Rev. Sam Rodriguez, and Catholic Archbishop Thomas Wenski.

Bread for the World continues to partner with the broad spectrum of faith-based groups in pushing for reform. Bread for the World Institute’s research on the economic impact of immigration is also impacting how immigration is viewed in economic terms. In February, the Detroit News published on op-ed by the Institute on the potential of immigration to help fuel the city’s revitalization.

Protecting the Child Tax Credit for All Families


Children in day care in Ohio. (Todd Post)

By Sarah Godfrey

Update: Feb. 12, 3:38 p.m. ET | The Senate has passed a final bill that does not include Sen. Ayotte's proposal to eliminate the child tax credit for millions of immigrant children.

Because I'm very vocal about being a TurboTax wizard, people often ask me to help them with their taxes. I've helped all sorts of friends with the daunting task of filing their returns—some married, some single; some parents, some not; some U.S. citizens, some not. Last year, I helped a friend fill out her tax return to make sure that she was able to take full advantage of all tax breaks she is eligible for as a mom and a low-wage worker. She is one of the 11-12 million people living in the country without documentation, and she is also eligible for the child tax credit (CTC).

My friend files her taxes using an individual tax identification number, or ITIN, rather than a Social Security number, which she doesn't have. Thankfully, she isn't penalized for this, and can still receive the CTC for her children. Although she isn't a U.S. citizen, she pays taxes—both state income tax and payroll tax. The CTC, which reduces her federal income tax by $1,000 per child, is a relatively small break, but it means a lot—it allows her to pay her rent, buy food, save for emergencies, and otherwise maintain stability and comfort for her family.

Unfortunately, that could soon change.

As early as this afternoon, the Senate will vote on an amendment by Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) to eliminate the child tax credit for immigrant children who do not have a Social Security number. This change could harm as many as 1 million young DREAMers who are growing up in the United States.

The child tax credit is one of this nation’s most effective anti-poverty programs, lifting 1.5 million children out of poverty every year. The average income of families receiving the refundable CTC is just $21,000 per year, and they rely on the child tax credit to help provide for their children.

Bread for the World and the Coalition on Human Needs ask that you call your senator today (1-888-853-7037) and tell him or her to oppose the Ayotte amendment. We shouldn’t be using anti-poverty programs as an offset for other programs or initiatives—the child tax credit rewards work and helps low-wage workers support their kids. This amendment, which amounts to a tax hike for the poor, is harmful, and could push millions of families—families who are just getting by—into poverty.

Sarah Godfrey is Bread for the World's associate online editor.

Pray for Immigration Reform with a Psalm about the Marginalized

Pray for reform
A group of advocates gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol, on June 27, 2013, to pray for compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

This week, House Republicans are talking about immigration during a retreat, and decisions they make will be critical in determining whether or not reform will be on their 2014 agenda.  Immigration is a hunger issue, and we at Bread for the World, along with our partners, pray that these congressional leaders consider principles that include ending hunger in proposed legislation.

Bread for the World is urging members of Congress to act on legislation that respects the dignity of immigrants in the United States, while addressing poverty and hunger overseas. Since 2010, Bread for the World Institute has researched immigration’s connections to hunger and poverty.We recognize that poor conditions in home countries are a major cause of unauthorized immigration to the United States, and we have identified five principles (PDF) that are crucial to craft policy that addresses hunger as a root cause of immigration.

Join us as we, and others, pray for reform and for the leaders who have the power to help end hunger both here and abroad. 

Psalm 146

Praise the Lord.

Praise the Lord, my soul.

I will praise the Lord all my life;
    I will sing praise to my God as long as I live.
Do not put your trust in princes,
    in human beings, who cannot save.
When their spirit departs, they return to the ground;
    on that very day their plans come to nothing.
Blessed are those whose help is the God of Jacob,
    whose hope is in the Lord their God.

He is the Maker of heaven and earth,
    the sea, and everything in them—
    he remains faithful forever.
He upholds the cause of the oppressed
    and gives food to the hungry.
The Lord sets prisoners free,
     the Lord gives sight to the blind,
the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down,
    the Lord loves the righteous.
 The Lord watches over the foreigner
    and sustains the fatherless and the widow,
    but he frustrates the ways of the wicked.

 The Lord reigns forever,
    your God, O Zion, for all generations.

Praise the Lord.

Immigration Reform: What's Next?


A group of advocates gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol, on June 27, 2013, to pray for compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

Update, Feb. 3, 2014: House Republican leadership has released a set of immigration reform principles. As expected, they offer a step-by-step approach to legislation rather than a comprehensive bill, such as the one the Senate passed last June. Border security and internal enforcement are prioritized as the first steps in the principles, but the guiding document also includes a path toward legalization—although, unlike the Senate bill, it does not specify a path to citizenship for all undocumented immigrants. The principles do, however, include a possible path to citizenship for young people brought to the United States as children, provided they either join the military or graduate from college.

It is unclear when and if the principles will jump-start immigration reform legislation in the House this year. We will continue to follow developments, report them on the Bread blog, and urge members of Congress to craft legislation that explicity addresses poverty both here in the United States and abroad.

Read Bread for the World’s immigration principles, which include ensuring legal status and a path to the citizenship for undocumented immigrants in the United States, as well as providing development assistance to countries with high poverty rates.

Original post: In coming days, House Republican leadership will release its principles for immigration reform, making the near-term prospects for reform clearer. The principles, likely to be issued around the time of the president's Jan. 28 State of the Union address, are expected to approve granting unauthorized immigrants provisional legal status that will give them the right to live and work in the United States. Under the principles, immigrants granted provisional status will eventually be allowed to apply for a green card.

This is the first time that House Republican leaders have endorsed legal status for many of the 11-12 million people living in the United States without legal permission. These principles, along with President Obama's State of the Union address, will provide clues to how Congress will address reform in early 2014.

The House Republican principles are expected to be broad, but will nevertheless provide the foundation for additional immigration bills that Republicans both inside and outside of the House Judiciary Committee are currently crafting. While Speaker John Boehner's (R-Ohio) office is leading the drafting of the principles, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is said to be leading the drafting of a Republican version of the DREAM Act, and Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) is also playing a minor role.

The emerging GOP approach also presents a challenge to Democrats, who have traditionally said that anything short of citizenship is an unacceptable second-class status. Nevertheless, there have been positive reactions from Democratic congressional leaders regarding the current movement among Republicans on the issue. Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) called the principles "a very important moment," adding that "part of the problem here is that the debate has been framed [as] 'Either it's citizenship for all or it's justice for no one.'"

Analysts and economic leaders also continue to present the economic case for immigration reform. This week, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg will meet with Republican lawmakers. It will be his first major public policy event since his term ended on Dec. 31. The meeting will include prominent Republicans and U.S. Chamber of Commerce representatives. The Baltimore Sun recently published a Bread for the World Institute op-ed on the potential of immigrants to revitalize Rust Belt cities and regions. And last week, an event on Capitol Hill that brought together immigrant integration civic leaders from the Midwest reinforced the economic argument for immigration reform.

As Congressional leaders seek bipartisan compromise, elevating the research on the economic contributions of immigrants, including low-skill immigrants, will be key to making the case for reform.

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