Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

71 posts categorized "Immigration"

Pray for a Hungry "Stranger"

Woman prays"Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me..."

                                          —Mathew 25:34-35

Immigration is a hunger issue. Our broken immigration system in the United States leaves too many without access to resources they need to live. Poverty and hunger have been major forces driving immigration to this country; for those who live here as undocumented immigrants, their status means a precarious life in the shadows.

Immigration reform is part of the exodus from hunger for which Bread for the World members advocate and pray. Yet, as legislation to reform immigration languishes and the House of Representatives fails to act, frustration on the part of advocates mounts and people continue to suffer. A Christian response requires us to use our voices and advocate for our brothers and sisters both here and abroad, but a faithful response to hunger also includes prayer. 

Today, we join with our partners in the Evangelical Immigration Table, and other people of faith, in praying for our leaders in Congress, the congregations and pastors who care for immigrants and their families, and for the millions of people hurt by an outdated immigration system.

Take a moment during your day, or at any point over the next 24 hours, and pray for those who hunger for reform. Use the prayer below or one of your own choosing. Ask other in your church, campus, or community to join you, and help make this day of prayer a powerful one that moves hearts and minds. If you are a Twitter user, ask others to join you in prayer and action by using the hashtag #Pray4Reform.

All things are possible through Christ who strengthens us.


Prayer for a Hungry "Stranger"

Lord Jesus Christ, Giver of abundant love,
guidance and protection,
our hearts are filled with gratitude.
Your love empowers us to do your will,
to be your hands and feet in this world,
for your purpose.
Your grace enables us to recognize injustice
and to partner in the restoration of brokenness in our
own lives and of unjust systems.
There is hunger and poverty in our world
that displaces our brothers and sisters from their homes and homelands.
Lord Jesus, we seek your shelter and protection.
Migrant workers harvest the food on our tables yet suffer
unsafe labor conditions and empty cupboards.
Lord Jesus, we imagine your harvest
to be rich and plentiful for all people
and that all people are fed and have a place at the table.
The decisions of lawmakers in this nation impact
the flourishing of millions children created in your image.
Lord Jesus, may we witness a change in this nation’s priorities so that
hunger is no longer acceptable.  
May we see the dignity
of every person upheld, especially their right to food.
Lord Jesus, may we be strengthened by your example
to welcome the stranger, love our neighbor and feed the hungry
so that our brothers and sisters everywhere will flourish.

—Krisanne Vaillancourt-Murphy

 

Photo: A woman prays during a worship service in Guatemala. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

Immigration Reform Update: Reform in 2014 in Limbo

Immigration rally
Demonstrators gathered at immigration reform rally in Los Angeles on Feb. 22, 2014. (Ricardo Moreno)

The prospects for immigration reform in 2014 were diminished in recent days when House Speaker John Boehner questioned whether an immigration bill could pass the House, due to Republicans’ “widespread doubt about whether this administration can be trusted to enforce our laws.” Rep. Boehner added, “It's going to be difficult to move any immigration legislation until that changes.”

After raising advocates’ hopes for reform this year with the release of House Republican principles for reform, Rep. Boehner’s comments put the short-term viability of immigration reform in limbo. Still, advocates continue to push for reform, both with Congress and the administration. Boehner’s apparent call for delaying immigration reform hasn’t prevented other Republican leaders and constituencies at the local, state, and national levels to continue to push for updating the nation’s outdated immigration system.

During a meeting with the National Governors’ Association in Washington, D.C., Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder said, "I'm a Republican and I'm happy to help lead the charge to say, 'Let's embrace immigration.'" Snyder described himself as being “probably among the most pro-immigration governors in the country."

In Congress, many of Boehner’s colleagues, including Republican Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart are reportedly working on legislation that will meet a majority of Republican representatives’ doubts regarding enforcing immigration provisions. Rep. Diaz-Balart also said it would meet many Democratic congressional members’ requirements. “Can you draft legislation that has serious border and interior security, with sufficient leverage to force this or future administrations?” Rep. Diaz-Balart said. “I think we have drafted a way to actually do that.”

Major Republican constituencies have also stepped up their pressure on Congress to bring immigration reform legislation to the House floor this year. U.S. Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue re-emphasized the economic need for immigration stating, “The case for immigration reform is clear. The need is undeniable. The time is now.” Donohue’s statement was followed by a multi-industry letter on immigration reform signed by 636 businesses. “Failure to act is not an option,” the letter stated.  

Faith-based groups across the political spectrum also continue to lead the push for reform. Catholic and evangelical Christian leaders united to urge Congress “to move forward and create a new immigration process.” Leaders participating in the call urging Congress to act included National Association of Evangelicals President Leith Anderson, National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference Rev. Sam Rodriguez, and Catholic Archbishop Thomas Wenski.

Bread for the World continues to partner with the broad spectrum of faith-based groups in pushing for reform. Bread for the World Institute’s research on the economic impact of immigration is also impacting how immigration is viewed in economic terms. In February, the Detroit News published on op-ed by the Institute on the potential of immigration to help fuel the city’s revitalization.

Protecting the Child Tax Credit for All Families


Children in day care in Ohio. (Todd Post)

By Sarah Godfrey

Update: Feb. 12, 3:38 p.m. ET | The Senate has passed a final bill that does not include Sen. Ayotte's proposal to eliminate the child tax credit for millions of immigrant children.

Because I'm very vocal about being a TurboTax wizard, people often ask me to help them with their taxes. I've helped all sorts of friends with the daunting task of filing their returns—some married, some single; some parents, some not; some U.S. citizens, some not. Last year, I helped a friend fill out her tax return to make sure that she was able to take full advantage of all tax breaks she is eligible for as a mom and a low-wage worker. She is one of the 11-12 million people living in the country without documentation, and she is also eligible for the child tax credit (CTC).

My friend files her taxes using an individual tax identification number, or ITIN, rather than a Social Security number, which she doesn't have. Thankfully, she isn't penalized for this, and can still receive the CTC for her children. Although she isn't a U.S. citizen, she pays taxes—both state income tax and payroll tax. The CTC, which reduces her federal income tax by $1,000 per child, is a relatively small break, but it means a lot—it allows her to pay her rent, buy food, save for emergencies, and otherwise maintain stability and comfort for her family.

Unfortunately, that could soon change.

As early as this afternoon, the Senate will vote on an amendment by Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) to eliminate the child tax credit for immigrant children who do not have a Social Security number. This change could harm as many as 1 million young DREAMers who are growing up in the United States.

The child tax credit is one of this nation’s most effective anti-poverty programs, lifting 1.5 million children out of poverty every year. The average income of families receiving the refundable CTC is just $21,000 per year, and they rely on the child tax credit to help provide for their children.

Bread for the World and the Coalition on Human Needs ask that you call your senator today (1-888-853-7037) and tell him or her to oppose the Ayotte amendment. We shouldn’t be using anti-poverty programs as an offset for other programs or initiatives—the child tax credit rewards work and helps low-wage workers support their kids. This amendment, which amounts to a tax hike for the poor, is harmful, and could push millions of families—families who are just getting by—into poverty.

Sarah Godfrey is Bread for the World's associate online editor.

Pray for Immigration Reform with a Psalm about the Marginalized

Pray for reform
A group of advocates gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol, on June 27, 2013, to pray for compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

This week, House Republicans are talking about immigration during a retreat, and decisions they make will be critical in determining whether or not reform will be on their 2014 agenda.  Immigration is a hunger issue, and we at Bread for the World, along with our partners, pray that these congressional leaders consider principles that include ending hunger in proposed legislation.

Bread for the World is urging members of Congress to act on legislation that respects the dignity of immigrants in the United States, while addressing poverty and hunger overseas. Since 2010, Bread for the World Institute has researched immigration’s connections to hunger and poverty.We recognize that poor conditions in home countries are a major cause of unauthorized immigration to the United States, and we have identified five principles (PDF) that are crucial to craft policy that addresses hunger as a root cause of immigration.

Join us as we, and others, pray for reform and for the leaders who have the power to help end hunger both here and abroad. 

Psalm 146

Praise the Lord.

Praise the Lord, my soul.

I will praise the Lord all my life;
    I will sing praise to my God as long as I live.
Do not put your trust in princes,
    in human beings, who cannot save.
When their spirit departs, they return to the ground;
    on that very day their plans come to nothing.
Blessed are those whose help is the God of Jacob,
    whose hope is in the Lord their God.

He is the Maker of heaven and earth,
    the sea, and everything in them—
    he remains faithful forever.
He upholds the cause of the oppressed
    and gives food to the hungry.
The Lord sets prisoners free,
     the Lord gives sight to the blind,
the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down,
    the Lord loves the righteous.
 The Lord watches over the foreigner
    and sustains the fatherless and the widow,
    but he frustrates the ways of the wicked.

 The Lord reigns forever,
    your God, O Zion, for all generations.

Praise the Lord.

Immigration Reform: What's Next?


A group of advocates gathered in front of the U.S. Capitol, on June 27, 2013, to pray for compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

Update, Feb. 3, 2014: House Republican leadership has released a set of immigration reform principles. As expected, they offer a step-by-step approach to legislation rather than a comprehensive bill, such as the one the Senate passed last June. Border security and internal enforcement are prioritized as the first steps in the principles, but the guiding document also includes a path toward legalization—although, unlike the Senate bill, it does not specify a path to citizenship for all undocumented immigrants. The principles do, however, include a possible path to citizenship for young people brought to the United States as children, provided they either join the military or graduate from college.

It is unclear when and if the principles will jump-start immigration reform legislation in the House this year. We will continue to follow developments, report them on the Bread blog, and urge members of Congress to craft legislation that explicity addresses poverty both here in the United States and abroad.

Read Bread for the World’s immigration principles, which include ensuring legal status and a path to the citizenship for undocumented immigrants in the United States, as well as providing development assistance to countries with high poverty rates.

Original post: In coming days, House Republican leadership will release its principles for immigration reform, making the near-term prospects for reform clearer. The principles, likely to be issued around the time of the president's Jan. 28 State of the Union address, are expected to approve granting unauthorized immigrants provisional legal status that will give them the right to live and work in the United States. Under the principles, immigrants granted provisional status will eventually be allowed to apply for a green card.

This is the first time that House Republican leaders have endorsed legal status for many of the 11-12 million people living in the United States without legal permission. These principles, along with President Obama's State of the Union address, will provide clues to how Congress will address reform in early 2014.

The House Republican principles are expected to be broad, but will nevertheless provide the foundation for additional immigration bills that Republicans both inside and outside of the House Judiciary Committee are currently crafting. While Speaker John Boehner's (R-Ohio) office is leading the drafting of the principles, Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) is said to be leading the drafting of a Republican version of the DREAM Act, and Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.) is also playing a minor role.

The emerging GOP approach also presents a challenge to Democrats, who have traditionally said that anything short of citizenship is an unacceptable second-class status. Nevertheless, there have been positive reactions from Democratic congressional leaders regarding the current movement among Republicans on the issue. Rep. Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) called the principles "a very important moment," adding that "part of the problem here is that the debate has been framed [as] 'Either it's citizenship for all or it's justice for no one.'"

Analysts and economic leaders also continue to present the economic case for immigration reform. This week, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg will meet with Republican lawmakers. It will be his first major public policy event since his term ended on Dec. 31. The meeting will include prominent Republicans and U.S. Chamber of Commerce representatives. The Baltimore Sun recently published a Bread for the World Institute op-ed on the potential of immigrants to revitalize Rust Belt cities and regions. And last week, an event on Capitol Hill that brought together immigrant integration civic leaders from the Midwest reinforced the economic argument for immigration reform.

As Congressional leaders seek bipartisan compromise, elevating the research on the economic contributions of immigrants, including low-skill immigrants, will be key to making the case for reform.

2013: Year in Review and a Look Ahead


Feet

Farm work in rural Guatemala (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World).

You will be enriched in every way so that you can be generous on every occasion, and through us your generosity will result in thanksgiving to God. This service that you perform is not only supplying the needs of the Lord’s people but is also overflowing in many expressions of thanks to God. (2 Corinthians 9: 11-12 NIV)


In 2013, the generosity of Bread for the World members in time, talent, and treasure has borne fruit in the mission to end hunger. You helped us reach our year-end fundraising goals and helped set the foundation of support for our work in 2014. The year will start with a packed agenda as we ask Congress to extend emergency unemployment insurance, pass a farm bill that protects SNAP (formerly food stamps) and strengthens U.S. food aid, and urge passage of an immigration reform bill that helps end hunger both here and abroad. January’s packed agenda will also include ensuring programs such as WIC and Head Start as well as poverty-focused development assistance get sufficient funding for the remainder of the fiscal year though the appropriations process. Our 2014 Offering of Letters, launching later this month, will urge Congress to update and reform U.S. food aid, which could benefit 17 million more people each year.

As we look back on 2013 one thing is clear: your willingness to reach out to your members of Congress and tell them to make hunger and poverty a priority made the difference. In a hostile budget climate and with continued threats of deep cuts to anti-hunger and anti-poverty programs, our 2013 Offering of Letters targeted both Congress and the White House for the first time.

Through the Offering of Letters, you urged Congress to protect critical programs and petitioned the president to set a goal to end hunger. As a result of our work in 2012, the president’s 2013 State of the Union address called for an end to extreme poverty in the United States and around the world. We continued to message the president and received more than 40,000 signatures on our petition to President Obama, which we hand-delivered to the White House in August.

Bread for the World prevented harmful cuts to SNAP, successfully blocking $135 billion in SNAP cuts in the federal budget, and a House of Representatives proposal to cut the program by $40 billion.

During October’s government shutdown and near default on the debt ceiling, we worked with our faith partners to re-open the government and prevent service disruptions that would have disproportionately affected struggling families.

And although the latest budget deal was far from perfect, final legislation replaced part of the 2014 and 2015 sequester with a balance of spending cuts and revenues – an ask our members took with them to their members of Congress during the 2013 Lobby Day in Washington, D.C. The hard work of Bread members helped ensure that those cuts also stayed balanced between defense and non-defense programs.

Finally, thanks to the efforts of Bread for the World and our partners over the last few years, some of our work came to fruition in 2013. The U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee unanimously passed the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act, which calls for increased and improved monitoring of U.S. foreign assistance and its impact. We are optimistic that the full Senate will take up this bill and pass it in 2014.

As we look ahead to 2014, we are assured that through faith and action we can do great things together.

Immigration Reform: Looking Ahead to 2014

Fastforfamilies
Participants in the Fast for Families, join together in prayer (Photo courtesy of Fast for Families).

In spite of the House of Representatives' inaction on immigration reform this year, 2013 ended with a crescendo of activity among advocates, and planning for a harder push for reform in 2014.

In November, faith, immigrant rights, and labor organizations launched the Fast for Families campaign, an effort to move the hearts of members of Congress, and inspire them to pass just and compassionate immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Bread for the World was one the sponsors of Fast for Families, and on Dec. 5, Bread for the World President David Beckmann prayed and fasted at the campaign tent on the National Mall, just a few blocks from Bread’s Washington, D.C., office.

“Immigration reform will allow people to work their way out of poverty,” Beckmann said.  He added that “immigration is part of the great exodus from poverty that is going on today,” and said that nations with comprehensive immigration policies have been able to more efficiently combat poverty than the United States. 

On Dec. 12, the Fast for Families campaign culminated its activities for the year with major direct action in Congress. More than 1,000 activists occupied the offices of 170 congressional representatives who were inactive on reform during 2013. Bread for the World was a full participant in the daylong action, working with our faith partners on several aspects of the event.

Ricardo Moreno, Bread for the World’s national organizer for Latino relations, kicked off Bread’s participation by leading a prayer service at the fasting tents in the morning. In the afternoon, a dozen Bread for the World staffers participated in the congressional action, “occupying” a congressional office and singing, praying, and sharing stories about the personal, real-world implications of the nation’s broken immigration system for families in the United States and overseas.

The Fast for Families campaign promised that the action was a symbol of increased grassroots engagement 2014.

In addition to grassroots action, Bread for the World staff members have been meeting with House Republican offices–including those of Republican leaders such as Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.)–to discuss the economic importance of immigration to the economy.Lower-skilled immigrants, in particular, revitalize rural and urban areas through their labor and entrepreneurship.

Although House Republicans didn’t act on immigration in 2013, they have repeatedly stated that it will be on the agenda in 2014. House Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) has indicated he would like to tackle the issue next year. Speaker Boehner also signaled that he is serious about addressing immigration reform when he hired Rebecca Tallent, from the Bipartisan Policy Center, to lead his immigration policy work. Tallent is a veteran on immigration reform, and worked on previous congressional attempts at reform as a staffer for Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.).

Next year promises to be important for the immigration reform movement and Bread for the World will be fully engaged on the ground in Washington, D.C., and throughout the country.

Fast for Families: La lucha sigue!

Declaration
(Photo courtesy of Fast for Families)

By Dulce Gamboa

“Is not this the kind of fasting I have chosen:
 to loose the chains of injustice  and untie the cords of the yoke,
to set the oppressed free and break every yoke?
Is it not to share your food with the hungry and to provide the poor wanderer with shelter—
when you see the naked, to clothe them,  and not to turn away from your own flesh and blood?"

Isaiah 58:6-7 (NIV)

Last week, I had the privilege of standing with participants in the Fast for Families campaign, an effort to move members of Congress to pass compassionate, comprehensive immigration reform.

I joined the fast for two days, in solidarity with the fasters leading this effort, and my heart was definitely full after meeting immigration reform advocates who fasted for more than 20 days as an act of love, faith, and commitment. I was filled with hope after listening to the stories of fellow fasters and community leaders who have defied the odds to gain the attention of Congress. So many people involved in the immigration reform movement were appalled by the inaction in Congress— the House of Representatives has failed to act on immigration reform—and the idea that reform can wait. In reality, the roughly 11 million undocumented immigrants living in this country, and their families, cannot wait. Every day, families are torn apart, and millions of people live in fear of deportation.

Bread for the World was one of the sponsors of Fast for Families, which launched Nov. 12 and ended Dec. 12. Several of our staff members, including David Beckmann, fasted, and we participated in both a Dec. 11 prayer service at the fasters’ tent on the National Mall, and a Dec. 12 congressional day of action. During the Dec. 12 action, more than 1,000 people involved with Fast for Families visited 170 offices of members of the House Representatives, in what was called a “day of promise and prayer." We sought to touch their hearts, and move then to enact compassionate reform that includes a path to citizenship for the millions of people living in the shadows.

Bread staff prayed and sang for an hour in the office of Rep. Leon Acton “Lynn” Westmoreland (R-Ga.) of Georgia's third district. We felt re-energized by the prayers, chants, and stories we delivered that day. All the stories we shared of people migrating to the United States had a common thread: each person was escaping poverty and hunger in his or her home country. The stories showed that when we talk about immigration reform, we are talking about people.

Immigrants are making an immense economic contribution to this nation. We are helping to revitalize depressed local economies, everywhere from rural Iowa to Detroit and Baltimore. We are entrepreneurs, dreamers graduating from college. We are part of this nation—a nation of immigrants.

The immigration movement has knocked on many doors for decades now. We have made it this far thanks to the perseverance and sacrifice of great advocates. The fast is now over, but this is the kickoff of the next phase of putting pressure on the House until its members bring immigration reform to the floor for a vote.

Even though we are facing inaction in the House right now, as advocates we must continue to strengthen our resolve and prepare for what’s next.

La lucha sigue! We shall overcome!

Dulce Gamboa is Bread for the World's associate for Latino Relations.

Rev. David Beckmann Joins Fasts for Families

David_at_Fast_for_Families
Rev. David Beckmann talks to a Fast for Families activist on Dec. 5, 2013, in Washington, D.C. (Joseph Molieri/Bread for the World)

By Allie Gardner  

Today, in a small tent on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall, Bread for the World President Rev. David Beckmann prayed and fasted with a group of Fast for Families advocates.

Fast for Families is an effort, by faith, immigrant rights, and labor leaders, to move Congress to pass compassionate immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship. Some of the participants have been fasting since the campaign launched on Nov. 12, while others have chosen to fast for shorter periods of time—one week, one day, or one meal. The fasters have received an outpouring of support: both President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden have visited the tent, as have several members of Congress.

Beckmann is fasting today, and during his time with the other Fast for Families activists, he talked about the importance of working together to achieve immigration reform. “Immigration reform will allow people to work their way out of poverty,” Beckmann said.  He later added that “immigration is part of the great exodus from poverty that is going on today,” and said that nations with comprehensive immigration policies have been able to more efficiently combat poverty than the United States. 

Granting legal status or citizenship to the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States will reduce poverty by giving them access to additional education and employment opportunities. Comprehensive, compassionate immigration reform would not only decrease poverty levels, but boost the strength of the U.S. economy.

In the Fast for Families tent, the group’s organizers said that they normally ask a few things of those who visit their site. First, they ask that people fast. Whether it’s for one meal or one day, there is power in standing in solidarity with those who regularly go hungry. Second, they ask that all visitors take action. Taking action can take a variety of forms—sharing your story, contacting members of Congress, or supporting immigration reform campaigns with your time or monetary gifts. Finally, the group asks that everyone pray. Prayer is powerful, and Scripture tell us that people who come together in prayer can achieve amazing things. “Where two or three are gathered in my name, there I am in the midst of them” (Matthew 18:20).  (Bread for the World is hosting evening prayers at the tent on Wednesday, Dec. 11.)

We ask that you join us in fasting, taking action, and praying. If you're able, please sign up to fast, participate in an action in your area, and be sure to contact your representative and tell him or her that it's time for the House of Representatives to move immigration reform forward.

Allie Gardner is a media intern at Bread for the World.

Fast for Families: A Call for Immigration Reform

Fastforfamilies
Participants in the Fast for Families, join together in prayer (photo courtesy of Fast for Families).

In February 2004, Sang Hyuk Jung left Korea and came to the United States, full of hope for a better future. He had visited the country a year earlier to prepare his paperwork and meet with several  "experts," who told him that everything would be fine as long as he paid his "immigration fees." 

Several years passed, and Jung learned that his case had gone nowhere. He was out a huge sum of money, and the "immigration consultant" he'd been working with threatened to turn him in to authorities if he contacted him again. Jung later applied to change his visa status through the proper channels, but his application was denied. He fell into a deep depression and even thought about going back to Korea, but didn't want to uproot his children, who had been living in the United States for five years at that point. He continues to live in this country without legal documentation.

Jung is one of people participating in Fast for Families: A Call for Immigration Reform. On Nov. 12, faith, immigrant rights, and labor leaders launched the fast in an effort to move the hearts of members of Congress, and inspire them to pass compassionate immigration reform that includes a path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States. Bread for the World is one of the sponsors of Fast for Families, and several Bread staff members are fasting.

Jung says he is participating because he is tired of living in the shadows.

"I don’t want to be ashamed of who I am," he wrote in a recent blog post. "I want to tell you, tell others that we should not be discouraged. I know how difficult it is to live as an undocumented immigrant. Yet, I (and my family still) have hope. I believe we can pass comprehensive immigration reform together.

"I also have a message to the members of Congress," he continued. "We, the undocumented, are not different from you. We are just like your friends and families. We also work hard and pay taxes to make this nation better. We’ve been a part of this great nation. If you continue to deny our rights as human beings, if you use us for your political advantage, if you continue to break our families, you will find yourself isolated and you will be held responsible when immigrant families stride to polling places."

We ask that you join us in standing in solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are seeking U.S. citizenship. Sign up to fast, participate in an action in your area, and be sure to contact your representative and tell him or her that it's time for the House of Representatives to move immigration reform forward.

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