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123 posts categorized "Lent Series"

Lenten Devotions: "The Beginning of Life"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

DietrichApril 10, 2014

"When morning sun brings the dawn,
Love light my way
Lead me on as world turns 'round
and night enfolds the day
Through spinning seasons, reeling change,
Lord light my way
Each one in rhythm with the song of life you did create
Surprised us with grace
Beside us you stay
Recognized us for who we are and whose we are by name."
 
— Lyrics from "Lord Light My Way," by Peter Mayer and Patricia O'Reilly

Sixty-nine years ago yesterday, Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer was led from his cell at a prison camp in Flossenburg, Germany. As he was led away to be hanged, it is recorded that he said, "This is the end—for me, the beginning—of life."

It is hard from where we sit today, almost 70 years later, to imagine the horror and darkness of that time. In many ways, it is quite similar to the horror and darkness the earliest disciples of Jesus experienced at the hands of the Romans. Throughout history, these dark periods have been encountered again and again by followers of the Light of the World, Jesus Christ.

St. Paul wrote, "For once you were darkness, but now in the Lord you are light. Live as children of light" (Ephesians 5:8).

I think of the way that evening prayer begins. A cantor carrying a candle enters the darkened sanctuary. These words are sung: "Jesus Christ is the Light of the World."

The response, "The Light no darkness can overcome," is from memory—it's too dark to read the hymnbook or the printed page of the bulletin. The cantor makes his or her way down the center aisle.

"Stay with us for it is evening."

"And the day is almost over."

As the cantor approaches the front of the sanctuary, one more prayer is prayed.

"Let your light scatter the darkness."

"And illumine the church"

The candle is placed in the candle holder, and then the cantor sings what is called the "Lucinarium," which means light! "Joyous Light of Glory."

Some of you probably can remember when electricity came to the community in which you and your family were living. It was remarkable. I've been places in the world where electricity, and consequently electrical lights, have only recently come, and it is, as you know and might suspect, quite the game changer.

Moving from darkness to light is a remarkable journey.

Peter sings, "Love light my way, Lead me on as world turns 'round, and night enfolds the day."

Blessings to you this day, may Love and Light lead your way today!

P.S. Dear readers, some folks have asked about a gluten-free communion bread recipe. My suggestion, and practice, has been to substitute gluten-free flour in the recipe, and add a little bit (like a 1/4 teaspoon) of xanthan gum to the mix. The bread turns out quite lovely.

P.P.S.  Here's the Irish Soda Bread Recipe.

Photo: Memorial plaque Dietrich Bonhoeffer by Johannes Grützke at St. Matthew's Church Matthäikirchplatz Berlin-Tiergarten. (Wikimedia Commons)

Lenten Devotions: "Where Are You?"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'45th parallel' photo (c) 2007, Julia Manzerova - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

April 9, 2014

"Tried to run fast enough
Tried to fly high enough
Thought that I could dive deep enough
To lose your hold on me

The end of the road the bottom of the glass
The grip of fear that holds you fast
Lost in the valley no song to sing
When you're brushed by an angel's wings

And you're Still in One Peace
Still in One Peace
We are blessed we are broken
Given one more chance to be
Found in you we are
In One Peace."

--Lyrics from "Still in One Peace," by Peter Mayer

Halfway between the equator and the North Pole. I just love that sign because it reminds me, and hopefully you, that we always have choices. Sometimes, I think we can feel like there aren't many options or choices for us. But, when you stop and think about it, there is a whole world just right outside your door.

Peter sings about trying to run away from God. He's not the first one to try that act. Adam and Eve also wanted to hide from God. I'm sure you've seen other people trying to hide from God, as well. But, this amazing God we have is everywhere, so where can one go?

The answer is nowhere! And the good news is that God is "now here!" God is here in the very basic stuff of our lives. So, rejoice in the one peace that binds our hearts and souls together in unity.

Lenten Devotions: Baking Communion Bread

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

Communion_bread
Communion bread, baked by Pastor Ron, at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. (Courtesy of Pastor Ron Glusenkamp)

April 8, 2014

"Pass it on
Break the bread,
Lift the cup
Pass it on
The broken will be lifted up
 
Every gift grand and lowly
Every purpose great and small
At this feast they are made holy
By your name you have been called
By your name you have been called."
 
—Lyrics from "Pass It On," by Peter Mayer and Patricia O'Reilly

There is something wonderful about making communion bread. It doesn't take very long to do, and the results are just fantastic. I've put together a video on how I make communion bread according to the Luther Seminary recipe. It's pretty simple. I know for certain that each time you do it, you'll find that it's easier and also more fun.

Why do I think this is important? Well, I believe it is important to use bread as often as one can for communion. At our congregation we don't always use bread, but when we do, people seem to notice. I will also say that not everyone likes real bread at communion. I'm not certain of the reasons for that, but my hunch is that it's too "earthy."

In other words, I think for some people it's simply not spiritual enough. Now, I don't necessarily agree with that viewpoint, but I've been doing this long enough to realize that, ultimately, the "delivery system" — chalice or individual cups, wafers or bread — doesn't matter. What matters are, as Martin Luther said, the words "given and shed for you."

That's what Peter is singing about:

"Break the bread,
Lift the cup
Pass it on
The broken will be lifted up."

It's all about being in communion.

Lenten Devotions: The Trust of Trees

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'tree on the rocks' photo (c) 2007, Ralf Kayser - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

April 7, 2014
 
"Only You can stand beside me through all my thoughts and deeds
You raised the might Redwood from the seed
Only You formed the mountains that stretch to the sky
Cover them with moonlight tonight
I know it in my heart to be true
The answer to me is only You."

—Lyrics from "Only You," by Peter Mayer and Jim Mayer

Every once in a while you see a tree growing out of the rocks. It's amazing that anything can survive in such a seemingly harsh climate and terrain. Yet, a tree grows among all the sand, rocks, and beautiful formations. I don't know how the tree got to be where it is. Maybe a bird was carrying a seed and dropped it in a particular spot. Or perhaps the wind blew a seed to that location. Obviously the location and situation were just right for something to take root and grow. It boggles the mind.

People are a lot like plants. Sometimes people grow and flourish in the most difficult situations. Other times, even though the soil, drainage, lighting, and nutritional input is exactly what the horticulturalist ordered, nothing (or more appropriately, no one) seems to blossom and grow.

The tendrils of the roots seek out water and receive nourishment. I'm thinking about young people whose witness brings their parents to church. I'm giving thanks for grandparents, aunts and uncles, and neighbors who give a ride to friends so they can come to church. I rejoice in people who are "connectors" so that Living Water flows to those who are thirsty for something real to drink.

Today's First lesson from Isaiah offers an invitation:

"Ho, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and you that have no money,
come, buy and eat!    
Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price" (Isaiah 55:1).

"I know it in my heart to be true
The answer to me is only You." "Only You," by Peter Mayer and Jim Mayer

So, one of the things to reflect on this Lent is "where are you planted?"

And the following passage from Jeremiah seems to suggest that where one is "planted" is somewhat conditional on where, or what, or in whom one places trust.

I'm trusting that you are growing in your trust of God.

"Thus says the LORD:
      Cursed are those who trust in mere mortals
      and make mere flesh their strength,
      whose hearts turn away from the LORD.
They shall be like a shrub in the desert,
      and shall not see when relief comes.
      They shall live in the parched places of the wilderness,
      in an uninhabited salt land.
Blessed are those who trust in the LORD,
      whose trust is the LORD.
They shall be like a tree planted by water,
      sending out its roots by the stream.
      It shall not fear when heat comes,
      and its leaves shall stay green;
      in the year of drought it is not anxious,
      and it does not cease to bear fruit" (Jeremiah 17).

Shall we gather at the river?

Lenten Devotions: Chicken Noodle Soup

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'Chicken Noodle Soup' photo (c) 2013, Cajsa Lilliehook - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

April 5, 2014

"Every gift grand and lowly
Every purpose great and small
At this feast they are made holy
By your name you have been called
By your name you have been called"
 
—Lyrics from "Pass It On," by Peter Mayer

"I'll tell you one thing, Franny. One thing I know. And don't get upset. It isn't anything bad. But if it's the religious life you want, you ought to know right now that you're missing out on every single...religious action that's going on around this house. You don't even have sense enough to drink when somebody brings you a cup of consecrated chicken soup--which is the only kind of chicken soup Bessie ever brings to anybody around this madhouse."
—From "Franny and Zoey," by J.D. Salinger
 
I like Salinger's point that often the "holy" is right there in front of us. In this particular case, it happens to be the "consecrated chicken soup." The soup that was made for our soup luncheon on Wednesday struck me as being "consecrated." It was made with love. It wasn't "store-bought," it made at home by a busy person who took time to share her gifts with others. The physical ingredients made it tasty, but it was all the more delicious because I know it was made with care.
 
That particular soup experience inspired me to make some chicken noodle soup on Thursday. I trust, as Peter sings, that, "Every gift grand and lowly, Every purpose great and small, At this feast they are made holy, By your name you have been called."
 
Share the joy of this mighty love: celebrate SOUP!

Lenten Devotions: "We Are Changed"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'[ V ] Diego Velazquez - Kitchen Maid with the Supper at Emmaus' photo (c) 2011, Playing Futures:  Applied Nomadology - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

April 2, 2014

“We are joy, we are broken pieces
Upon a spinning, changing world we are borne
But for the love that will not release us
Our Rock of ages and our carry home
And we’ll sing it to the hills and the valleys
From every land ‘cross every sea
We will sing it when our hearts are breaking

And rejoice in the song of victory.”

Lyrics from "We Are Changed," by Peter Mayer

We have a saying at church: “deaths come in threes.” Perhaps you have expressed those sentiments or experienced that reality as well. Recently, our congregation has gone through a time where we have felt that reality to be more than doubled, and almost tripled, in recent weeks. In other words, we have been working with individuals and families who have had a loved one die. The words we proclaimed on Ash Wednesday, just four weeks ago,  are ringing in our ears: “you are dust and to dust you shall return.”

Just yesterday, I stood with a dear family in the ICU, and we commended their loved one to God. I read the words of Simeon who sang, “Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel” (Luke 2).

I shared that with them on my way into the hospital I sat for a moment and looked up at the mountains. That view led me to read for them these words of Psalm 121:

"I lift up my eyes to the hills —
from where will my help come?
My help comes from the LORD,
who made heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved;
he who keeps you will not slumber.
He who keeps Israel
will neither slumber nor sleep.
The LORD is your keeper;
the LORD is your shade at your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day,
nor the moon by night.
The LORD will keep you from all evil;
he will keep your life.
The LORD will keep
your going out and your coming in
from this time on and forevermore."

I spoke directly to their loved one in the bed, not sure if she could hear me or understand me or not (but I always assume they can), and said, “this is a time of going out and coming in--there is a very fine line here, but you are surrounded by a circle of love.” We prayed the Lord’s Prayer and then each person--a husband, two daughters,  and a sister plus myself--all said something that we loved or admired about the person.

She died less than four hours later.

Peter sings, “We will sing it when our hearts are breaking
/And rejoice in the song of victory.”

I find myself in that space today. My heart is broken, but I am also confident and certain of the final victory.

The painting at the top of the page is in the National Gallery in Dublin. It was painted by Diego Velazquez. It is simply titled, “The Maid at the Supper at Emmaus.”

There is something going on with her. She is being changed. Through a tiny window one sees Jesus and a guest at dinner.

I like it. We don’t always get to see the whole picture but we receive hints, reminders, and glimpses along the way.

“We are joy, we are broken pieces
Upon a spinning, changing world we are borne
But for the love that will not release us
Our Rock of ages and our carry home."

 

Lenten Devotions: "Foolishness"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'Jester- Joker Card' photo (c) 2012, GoShows - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/April 1, 2014

"For the day will come
when you leave this dusty town
And your cross will take its place
by your father's in the ground

Love is not just a fable
that Hollywood bought and sold
Oh let me tell you now love is the only road"

Lyrics from "Blue River," by Peter Mayer and Vince Varvel

I have always thought and felt that these lyrics of Peter's reflect a deep, conscious spirituality. They are mindful of our mortality. They also reflect and point to something greater and much larger than ourselves, namely love.

Today is a day for foolishness. Psalm 14:1 reminds us, "The fool has said in his heart there is no God." So, I'm not advocating that type of foolishness, but rather the folly that St. Paul wrote about to the Corinthians. Check out this message from 1 Cor 1:

"For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written,

'I will destroy the wisdom of the wise,

and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.'

Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For God's foolishness is wiser than human wisdom, and God's weakness is stronger than human strength."

 Jesus' words often sound like foolishness, don't they?

"Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven."

"Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted."

"Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth."

"Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled."

"Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy."

"Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God."

"Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God."

"Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven."

"Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my accountRejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you."

Try these on for size today. I bet you find they fit. No foolin'.

Lenten Devotions: "Islands"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

'Atoll Island' photo (c) 2008, Christina Spicuzza - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

March 31, 2014

"So they gathered up the driftwood made it watertight
And drifted rudderless to the horizon
I'm confused and I'm scared he said
and we got no land in sight
But I've got you dear to keep my eyes on...
 
We're on our way to the last island
Don't look back don't think twice
Oh we're on our way to the last island
Something to call our own won't that be nice
 
I'm on my way to the last island
Gonna find my piece of paradise
Oh I'm on my way to the last island
Something to call my own
won't that be nice."

"The Last Island," by Peter Mayer and Roger Guth

Today is the day the church celebrates the life of priest and poet John Donne. Perhaps his most popular words are about the inter-connectedness of all people: his best-known phrase, "No man is an island," gives testimony to the fact that we are all related to one another.

"No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less. As well as if a promontory were. As well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee." John Donne wrote in "Meditation XVII."

I think Peter's song "The Last Island" is not something that is prescriptive—in other words, something that we should attempt to follow or emulate. Rather, it is "descriptive" of the desire to have one's own island, "a piece of paradise."

So, today we have the opportunity to contrast community versus isolation. I am most grateful for organizations that foster community as opposed to the tide of "having my way."

Blessings to you today as you celebrate being connected and related to one another.

Lenten Devotions: "Mud In Your Eye"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

Xrayvision600

Fourth Sunday in Lent
Laetare Sunday
March 30, 2014

"Dirty Hands, Dirty Feet
I'm over my head it's made a mess of me
But it keeps a coming back to the
Holy road means crashing you and me
You've gotta walk through
the muddy water to come clean."

Lyrics from "Dirty Hands, Dirty Feet," by Peter Mayer

"As he walked along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, "Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?" Jesus answered, "Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God's works might be revealed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world." When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man's eyes, saying to him "Go, wash in the pool of Siloam" (which means Sent). Then he went and washed and came back able to see" (John 9:1-7).

So, let's get this straight— in order for Jesus to heal the blind man, he mixes up a salve of saliva and holy ground to make mud and then spreads it on his eyes. The blind man is then instructed to "Go wash in the pool of Siloam." The blind man (or more appropriately, the "former blind man") came back "able to see."

I tried to check out the origination of the phrase, "Here's mud in your eye." But, most of the websites had all sorts of extraneous derivations of the phrase. However, I can't help but think that it has something to do with this incident in the Gospel of John. Jesus, like the Prophet Elisha, does something that would initially seem to compound the problem as opposed to alleviate it. I also wonder why Jesus didn't just say, "SEE!" and the blind man would miraculously have vision. What did it mean for Jesus to "get his hands dirty?"

What did it mean for the man to have a "muddy compress" applied to his non-seeing eyes?

The crazy advertisement at the top of the page used to appear in all the comic books that I would devour as a young boy. I think I probably spent more time fantasizing about having x-ray vision than I did about any of the characters in the comic books. Just imagine how it would be to have the ability to see through walls and other barriers.

Now that I have grown up (somewhat), I have met blind people who are able to "see" a great deal. Their awareness is heightened, and their senses often seem to function at levels which far exceed my capabilities. Conversely, there are other people who have 20/20 eyesight, and yet their "vision" is somewhat impaired.

During the season of Lent, it is part of our journey to catch glimpses of how God sees us: namely, as daughters and sons for whom God sent Jesus to live, die on a cross, and rise from the dead. That particular insight is life-changing.

 Today is also known as Laetare Sunday. It is a Holy "spring break" in the middle of Lent. Laetare comes from the Latin translation of Isaiah 66:10, "Laetare Jerusalem," or, "O, be Joyful, Jerusalem."

Be joyful!

"You've gotta walk through the muddy water to come clean"

Lenten Devotions: "Waterfall"

This Lenten season, Bread Blog will be running a series of devotions written by Pastor Ron Glusenkamp, senior pastor at Bethany Lutheran Church in Cherry Hills Village, Colo. The reflections are based, in part, on the music of Peter Mayer, accomplished vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter. The theme for this year's series is "Mighty This Love," named for one of Mayer's compositions (Listen to a special welcome message from Mayer).

This post is reprinted, with permission, from Glusenkamp's site, h20 devos. Audio podcast versions of the daily devotionals are also available.

Photo fountain 1March 28, 2013

“Waterfall drink your fill
Washing over you it spills
Night and day it’s runnin’ wild
We’re born to be a river child

Tossed about like a toy
From the badlands to good soil
We could’ve never bargained for
This mighty ride of Joy

This is Love that’s been spilled
This is grace that is willed
Every empty heart be filled
Waterfall, waterfall.”

—Lyrics from "Waterfall," by Peter Mayer, Brendan Mayer, and Adam Guth

It’s all about baptism.

A while ago, I visited Dublin’s Chester Beatty Library—a museum dedicated to ancient manuscripts—a museum dedicated to ancient manuscripts. This place was built to house texts long before the word “text” became a verb. It is really a temple for the written word. The benefactor collected sacred texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. I spent quite a bit of time just wandering around and looking at these magnificent books, scrolls, and drawings.

Just as I was leaving the building, my eye was drawn to the lovely display of water picture above.

I thought to myself, Wow, if I was in charge of church architecture, I’d want every worship space to have significant sacred space dedicated to a water feature.

For me, it’s all about baptism. It tells us who we are and whose we are. Peter calls us “river children,” for it is “love that’s been spilled, this is grace that is willed, every empty heart be filled.”

Photo: The pond in the atrium of the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, Ireland. (Courtesy of Ron Glusenkamp)

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