Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

33 posts categorized "Lobby Day"

Let Your Light Shine and Change the World

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Margaret Edmondson, an Idaho constituent, talks to Senator Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) during Bread for the World's 2012 Lobby Day in Washington, D.C. (Rick Reinhard).

By Amelia Kegan

What does it mean to live out the Lord’s Prayer and seek to build heaven on earth? How can we be the light that can transform a broken world? I believe, especially for Americans, the answer lies in using our gifts of citizenship. When we live out our faith in the public arena, the world can change.

I’m fortunate that I have a job that allows me to live out my faith. I’m a domestic policy analyst for a faith-based anti-hunger organization. My job is to understand public policy moving through Congress and analyze how it affects hunger.

I spend a lot of time on Capitol Hill urging members of Congress to vote for legislation that can end hunger and poverty. I know the impact the faith community has in the nation’s capital. When I lift up the needs of those struggling with hunger and poverty to members of Congress, I feel that I am living out my faith. When I hear from congressional staff that they received a pack of letters from a church back home in their state or district, so they already know about the issue I’m bringing up, I see God moving in our time and through our work to end hunger.

I meet many Christian leaders on Capitol Hill, and they, too, can be moved by your faith. There's a power in the Christian voice that the special interests just can't compete with. When we testify to God’s love for all in the public arena, we build a better world.

In Deuteronomy 6, Moses preaches: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. These commandments that I give you today are to be on your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates.” The city gates! You don't get more public than that.

Talking with people of influence – our elected leaders, as well as our friends, family, and fellow church congregants – about a world without hunger is part of living out our faith. Advocating about issues of hunger opens the gates for those left on the margins of society.

Our love of God should show up in everything we do. It is tempting to act out of that love when it's easy and convenient, but God's love is a love we cannot contain — it shines. It must be present and visible in all the public spaces of our lives — including in our role as citizens.

Each June, Bread for the World members gather in Washington, D.C., for our annual Lobby Day. If you cannot join us in person in Washington, consider taking the pledge to join our virtual Lobby Day. Our whole community must come together in order to really make an impact, so we hope you’ll join us.

Amelia Kegan is deputy director of government relations at Bread for the World.

Deliver Your Influence to Congress in Person

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By Eric Mitchell

Will you join us in making a difference for hungry people on Capitol Hill?

Bread for the World's 2014 Lobby Day will take place on Tuesday, June 10. The day is a unique opportunity for you to communicate personally with your members of Congress and their staffers in Washington, D.C. This year we will be focusing on two critical issues impacting hungry people in the United States and around the world: U.S. food aid programs and immigration reform.

Lobby Day will begin with worship, followed by an issues briefing, and then visits with congressional offices on Capitol Hill. We will be urging Congress to reform U.S. food aid programs and to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

In the evening, we will be hosting a reception honoring members of Congress who have worked to end hunger and poverty through their work in Congress. Reps. Ed Royce (Calif.-39), Eliot Engel (N.Y.-16), Spencer Bachus (Ala.-06), Frank Wolf (Va.-10), and Sen. Tom Harkin (Iowa) will be recognized for their efforts.

Registering is easy and free! Don’t miss out on the opportunity to be a part of another successful Lobby Day. I look forward to seeing you here in Washington, D.C., on June 10.

Eric Mitchell is Bread for the World's director of government relations.

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To attend the full 2014 National Gathering June 9-10, register online today. The full rate for registration is $80. Lobby Day is free, but registration is required.

Social Media and Bread for the World’s Lobby Day

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Today, June 11, is Lobby Day! If you're not joining us in person, you can still participate virtually. Making calls is a great way to support the advocates from your state who will be in Washington, D.C., today, as is using social media. 

Share the social media updates from Lobby Day participants, and send your own messages to your members of Congress, too. Your virtual participation helps spread the message that everyone deserves a place at the table.

Are you on Facebook?

1. Search for your member of Congress and “like” their page (this allows you to tag them).
2. Write a status update that tags your member(s) of Congress and includes the two key messages of Lobby Day: 1) Protect SNAP and improve international food aid in the farm bill, and 2) Replace sequestration with a balanced plan that includes both revenues and sensible cuts.
  • Example: “Sen.@RonWyden, my fellow Oregonians are visiting you this afternoon during @Bread for the World Lobby Day. They will ask you to please protect programs for hungry and poor people--and I am asking you, too!

Are you on Twitter?

All but a couple of our members of Congress are on Twitter--it's a great way to connect with your senators and representative. Tweets are short and sweet--tag your member of Congress,  include one of the key messages. Don’t forget to use the hashtag #BreadRising! We will retweet you from @bread4theworld, so that both members of Congress and the advocates on Capitol Hill will be able to see your support.
  • Sen. @RonWyden: Pls protect funding for #SNAP and #foodaid in the #farmbill. #breadrising

If you have questions or need additional help,message Sarah Godfrey or Robin Stephenson—the members of Bread’s social media team—on Twitter or Facebook.

Join Bread's Annual Lobby Day from Wherever You Are

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Photo: Bread for the World members in Ohio recently had an in-district meeting with Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-OH02). (l-r) Ceal Bellman, Laura Hovland, Nick Yoda, Rep. Wenstrup, Mary-Cabrini Durkin, Sydney Prochazka, and Cindy Browne.

Tomorrow, June 11, is Bread for the World’s annual Lobby Day. Each year, Bread for the World’s National Gathering culminates in a day dedicated to putting our faith into action by taking a message to Congress. You can join the chorus of voices urging our lawmakers to create policies that ensure everyone has a place at the table,

Your voice could not be more important right now, and just because you aren’t in Washington D.C., doesn’t mean you can’t participate. Sequestration is chipping away at critical and effective anti-hunger initiatives. There are efforts to cut SNAP (formerly food stamps) and international food aid in the farm bill.

Lobby Day participants will meet with members of Congress or their legislative staff in D.C. Imagine if they walk into a congressional office that has already received hundreds of calls preparing the member of Congress for the message they will deliver. When a Bread member says, “I am just one of the many Christians from your state/district who believes that the choices we make today will make a difference for poor and hungry people tomorrow,” your call will add impact to that statement.

Last week, Ohioans held an in-district meeting in Cincinnati (see photo), which will amplify Tuesday's Lobby Day visit for participants from that state. You can similarly add your voice and support with a simple phone call that will only take a few minutes of your time. 

Call or email your senators and representative today.  Use our special toll-free number (1-800-826-3688) and make sure to let them know you are a Bread for the World member.  Leave a message with the receptionist and ask your member of Congress to:

1.  Protect SNAP and improve international food aid in the farm bill.

2.  Replace sequestration with a balanced plan that has both revenues and sensible cuts.

Get the same resources that in-person participants will be using on our Lobby Day web page.  You can include additional facts from our Lobby Day talking points or share your personal story.

Even one voice has the power, but many voices in unison calling for a world where all God’s children have enough is a testament to the power of God’s love and grace--and just might move Congress, too.

Join Us for the National Gathering--On Social Media

BreadrisingFINAL1By Robin Stephenson

The plane tickets have been bought, bags are being packed, and in just two days, Bread members will gather in Washington, D.C. Just like the title of Art Simon’s book says, "Bread will Rise" beginning this Saturday and culminating in Lobby Day (Tuesday, June 11), when our members will take the outcry to end hunger to the offices of our legislators. We hope you will join us as well.

If you can’t physically come to this year’s Gathering, you can still participate virtually. Follow our social networks—this blog, Facebook, and our Twitter feed—and we'll keep you informed of what is happening with recaps, pictures, and more. The social media team and National Gathering participants will be live tweeting the workshops using the hashtag #BreadRising

Workshops will cover such diverse, yet interconnected, topics as immigration, foreign assistance, tax reform, malnutrition, and agriculture. Skills workshops designed to enhance the power of our advocacy will cover everything from how to create public dialogue to telling your story.  And you won’t want to miss inspiring words from keynote speakers like renowned preacher Rev. Dr. James Forbes, Esperanza President Rev. Luis Cortes, and USAID administrator Raj Shah. 

On Tuesday, as we head to Capitol Hill for Lobby Day, you can support Bread members from your home state as they tell our lawmakers that everyone deserves a place at the table. Participants will be tweeting about their meetings and posting pictures on their Facebook pages. We encourage remote participants to call their members of Congress, and use your social networks to amplify the message that polices in the farm bill must protect the most vulnerable and that it is time to put an end to sequestration and agree on a balanced, long-term plan for the nation's fiscal sustainability. 

You can follow each day's events by downloading the National Gathering event program. Pack your virtual bag and join the conversation on social media as we gather in our nation’s capital this weekend. There is more than enough food in the world to feed all people, yet millions still go hungry. Now is the time to gather the political will to follow Jesus' teaching and ensure a place at the table for the least of these. 

Robin Stephenson is national social media lead and senior regional organizer, western hub, at Bread for the World.

Put On Your Comfortable Shoes and Join Us

Photo: The street sign for Bread for the World's 2011 Lobby Day. (Jim Stipe)

By Christine Melendez Ashley

Wear comfortable shoes. That’s the most practical advice I can give you if you’re planning to join us for Bread for the World’s Lobby Day on Tuesday, June 11.

We’ll be walking the halls of Congress, meeting with senators, representatives, and their staffers—asking them to protect programs vital to hungry and poor people. On the morning of June 11, we will convene at the Mead Center in Washington, D.C., for worship, issue briefings, and practice sessions before heading to Capitol Hill to meet with our members of Congress.

Lobby Day is free, but registration is required. Please let us know today if you'll be able to join us. This allows us time to coordinate meetings with your members of Congress.

We will provide meals, talking points, shuttle transportation to and from congressional office buildings, and a closing service and reception. Comfortable shoes not included.

See you there!

Christine Melendez Ashley is a policy analyst with Bread for the World.

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If you are participating in Lobby Day, please join us on Wednesday, May 29, at 3 p.m. ET for our pre-Lobby Day training webinar!

Advocacy and the 2012 Hunger Justice Leader Program

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Photo: Hunger Justice Leaders pose in front of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building after meeting with people working in the White House Office of Public Engagement in Washington, D.C., on Monday, June 11, 2012. (Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World)

Editor's note: This article originally appeared in The Chinook: GPNW Community of Christ, Autumn 2012 edition.

By Lyle Anderson II

We live in a world with enough food for everyone, and yet so many go to bed at night not knowing where their next meal will come from. Caring for, and seeking, an end to the injustices of hunger and poverty has been a part of our story as Community of Christ from our earliest beginnings as a movement, and a part of our calling we have been reminded of in Doctrine and Covenants 163:4a,c: “God, the Eternal Creator, weeps for the poor, displaced, mistreated, and diseased of the world because of their unnecessary suffering. Such conditions are not God’s will… Do not turn away from them. For in their welfare resides your welfare…. Prepare new generations of disciples to bring fresh vision to bear on the perplexing problems of poverty, disease, war, and environmental deterioration.”

It was a great honor to be selected as one of 70 young adult ministers from 16 Christian traditions and 26 states to participate in Bread for the World’s 2012 Hunger Justice Leaders Workshop. We descended on Washington, D.C., on June 8; over the next few days, we learned about hunger, poverty, anti-hunger and poverty programs, and citizen advocacy.

We were a diverse group of people from varying backgrounds, but we shared one thing in common: grounded in our faith as disciples of Christ, we had a conviction and passion to end the injustice of hunger.

Continue reading "Advocacy and the 2012 Hunger Justice Leader Program" »

An Extra Time for the Grassroots Call

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Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID) meets with Bread for the World activist Margaret Edmondson of Idaho during Bread for the World's Lobby Day in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, June 12, 2012. (Photo by Rick Reinhard for Bread for the World)

By Robin Stephenson

In order to accommodate as many activists as possible, we have added an additional time for our Grassroots Conference Call (and Webinar) tomorrow, Aug. 21. Now you can call in at 4 p.m. Eastern Time (that is 1 p.m. Pacific Time for the West Coast) or at 8 p.m. Eastern Time (5 p.m. Pacific Time).  Register now for the slot that best fits your schedule!

The monthly call is a great way to get the most recent update on the Offering of Letters, ask questions of our expert policy analysts from our government relations department and hear from your dedicated organizing staff and Bread members.  

Continue reading "An Extra Time for the Grassroots Call " »

Why Do I Work at Bread for the World?

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Jon Gromek (left), a Bread for the World organizer, and Barbara Miller, a Bread member, hug during the Bread for the World Lobby Day opening worship in Washington, DC, on Tuesday, June 12, 2012. Photo by Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World.

Why do I work at Bread for the World? For me, it is an extension of my Sunday worship. The Orthodox theologian, Bishop Kallistos Ware writes:

‘Let us go forth in peace’ this is the last commandment of the Liturgy. It means, surely, that the conclusion of the Divine Liturgy is not an end but a beginning. "Let us go forth in peace," mean(s) the Liturgy is over, the liturgy after the Liturgy is about to begin.  This, then, is the aim of  [our worship]: that we should return to the world ... seeing Christ in every human person, especially in those who suffer.."

These words help me recall that my Sunday worship is not simply the recitation of prayers and attendance in a building; worship is service, not just a service. The monumental task of service to others in the world – the poor and hungry - cannot be accomplished in just a couple of hours.

Continue reading "Why Do I Work at Bread for the World?" »

Make Mine Inter-Dependence Day

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Photo by Flickr user  TMAB2003

Next week, we again celebrate our nation’s independence. We have a lot to be proud of in our country’s long struggle for freedom and liberty. But nowadays too many people in our country have taken this admirable national quality and transformed it into a personal privilege to turn our collective backs on those who are different from us; those who annoy or frustrate us; those who aren’t quite making it;  those who are vulnerable and need help in these troubled times. When our personal  “independence” alone takes center stage, what’s lost is the countervailing reality of “interdependence” — how our modern world makes us radically connected to others, whether we actually like it or not.

Interdependence means something like this:

When Congress slashes funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) or school meals programs, it means that kids don’t get enough to eat, don’t learn well, and won’t thrive economically in the future. This will, in turn, make our country’s fabric weaker in the long run.

Cutting international food aid or development assistance means families abroad don’t prosper, developing nations lag socially and economically, trading partners become weaker, and our own nation’s economic and national security bases erode. These are the ties that bind all of us closer each day.

Sure, we can try to hide our heads in the sand and say that independence matters most, enabling us to ignore our brothers and sisters, and their children and grandparents, who need some help to make ends meet. Sure, we can try to simply go our own way, paring back programs in the name of deficit reduction no matter what the consequences. But if we really love what our country has stood for through 236 long, thrilling, and arduous years, I say we celebrate this July 4 in a different way.  

This year let’s call it National Interdependence Day. Let’s carry that same generous spirit of justice and connectedness through the crucial weeks that follow when Congress considers and votes on key hunger legislation.

For that joyous July 4 Interdependence Day party, I’ll offer to  buy some really cool fireworks and cheer lustily, indeed. Join me!

ACT NOW:  Take a moment now and let your members of Congress know that you practice interdependence, and ask for a circle of protection around programs that help those who are poor and hungry both at home and abroad.  

  Larry-hollarLarry Hollar is senior regional organizer at Bread for the World.

 

 

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