Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

World Prayers for Oct. 12-18: Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Nepal

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Bangladesh. Bread for the World photo

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of October 12-18, we pray for: Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Nepal:

Good and gracious God, we come before you in thanksgiving for the many blessings you bestow.  We are grateful for the countries of Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Nepal in South Asia, for the wonder of their diverse landscapes, the majestic peaks, and vast mountain ranges.  We savor the rich and vibrant cultural heritage and spiritual history of this region.  These expressions are a reminder of your impressive power and the brilliance of your created order.  May we respect and savor all of your creation by living in ways that consider the consequences this region suffers related to climate change. 

As we pray for Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh, we ask you to guide the political transitions and peace-building efforts in this region as governments and civil society work toward representative structuring and public accountability. We especially lift up those who are hungry or materially impoverished because this perpetuates injustices such as forced labor, human trafficking, and abusive working conditions.  May the light of your resurrection lead us to stand in solidarity with the people of South Asia. Amen.   

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Bangladesh: 31.5
Bhutan: 12.0
Nepal: 25.2

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

Quote of the Day: Muhammad Yunus

MYunusQOTD

Join a Hunger and Climate Change Online Discussion Tomorrow

WorldBankpanelTomorrow, Oct. 10, the World Bank is hosting an online panel discussion titled “Food for the Future: Achieving Food Security in the Face of Climate Change.”

One of the panelists is Rev. David Beckmann, Bread’s president.

The discussion will examine the question How will we feed 9 billion people by 2050 in the face of environmental challenges?

Governments, the private sector, civil society, and other stakeholders need to come together to create innovative solutions and scale up actions that will feed the world in a way that is resource-efficient and resilient to climate change. The panel will feature experts on how a move toward climate-smart agriculture, more integrated landscapes and seascapes, and more sustainable
supply chains can help ensure food for the future.

Date: Friday, October 10
Time: 12:30 p.m.-1:45 p.m. ET
Location: Online

You can also follow the event on Twitter by using #food4future.

If you would like to do some reading to prepare for the conversation, additional resources are available as well as recommended reading.

World Food Day Twitter Chat with Bread

Bread-tile-A2Next week, on World Food Day, you can join another conversation with David Beckmann on Twitter, hosted by Bread for the World and the World Food Prize.

Date: Thursday, October 16, 2014
Time: 12:00 p.m. ET
Location: #WorldFoodDay

There are more than 500 million small family-owned farms in the world, and these farms are critical contributors to local economies, support sustainable agriculture, and play a crucial role in ending global hunger. As advocates, we must do our part to ensure farmers have the best resources to fight poverty and hunger. This is a chat with World Food Prize Laureates – 2014 laureate Dr. Sanjaya Rajaram and 2010 laureate Rev. David Beckmann – to learn how advocates can help small farmers reach the most people, so that together we can end hunger by 2030.

Be part of the discussion. Join this Twitter chat to celebrate #WorldFoodDay

Quote of the Day: Wangari Mathaai

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This is the week the Nobel Prizes are being announced, and so we are featuring a quote of the day every day from a Nobel Prize laureate.

I Give Because I Do Not Have

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by Adlai Amor

When Bread for the World staff were briefed about the Bread Rising campaign earlier this year, I did not hesitate to commit to it by praying more, acting more, and giving more. Here are my reasons for doing so.

I support Bread Rising because I do not have anything. All that I have comes from God. I am just a steward for whatever resources God has entrusted to me during this lifetime. When I die, as we all must, I will not be able to take anything with me. Thus, whatever good I can do in this life, especially through Bread Rising, I will do.

I support Bread Rising because I know the impact of Bread’s work. Several of my family and friends were badly affected when the strongest typhoon on record, Typhoon Haiyan, hit central Philippines late last year. My cousin, a Seventh Day Adventist pastor, and his family were among those who lost so much. But thanks to Bread’s advocacy in reforming U.S. food aid, nutritious food reached them sooner than if it had been shipped from the United States.  

I support Bread Rising because it is a calling. I work with Bread because it enables me to put my faith into action. Advocacy is hard work. There are times when I doubt my calling, but God refuses to give up on me. With such love, I cannot give up on God.

Through Bread Rising, I know we can end hunger by 2030.

Adlai Amor, Bread’s director of communications, is chair of the Presbyterian Publishing Corporation.

This post originally appeared in Bread for the World's September online newsletter.

Quote of the Day: Archbishop Desmond Tutu


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Bread for the Preacher: Kingdom Values

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Bread for the World photo

Every month, the church relations department at Bread for the World produces a resource specifically for pastors. Whether you are searching for inspiration for a sermon you're writing or are just a lectionary enthusiast, Bread for the Preacher is for you.

After reading this introduction, explore this month’s readings on the Bread for the Preacher web page, where you can also sign up to have the resource emailed to you each month.

By Bishop José García

Jesus said about his disciples: “They do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world” (John 17:16). Since we are not of this world, our worldview and way of thinking cannot be like that of those who claim an earthly citizenship. We should comply with the values and virtues of the Kingdom of God. These call for us to love our neighbor as Jesus loved us, through acts of kindness, compassion, service, and making this a priority in preaching and living.

This way of living is different from the social norm of individualistic achievements and the pursuit of our dreams and personal happiness as a top priority. We need to ask ourselves: Are we to live according to the rule of this world and its governor (the evil one) or according to the rule of the Kingdom of God, which is ruled by the righteous one?

The texts this month present powerful biblical reflections on how to uphold the values of the Kingdom of God through love, service, and righteousness.

José García is the director of church relations at Bread for the World.

 

Nothing Can Get in Our Way This Midterm Election

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By Stephen Padre

Major news outlets from NPR to the Washington Post are reporting that the midterm elections – a little less than a month away – are being called the “Seinfeld election.” In other words, the election is about nothing, just as the popular comedy show of the 1990s was largely about nothing.

Granted, midterm elections don’t attract as much interest or debate from voters as a banner presidential election. Yet it’s important to remember that the entire lower chamber of Congress – the House of Representatives – is up for election as is a third of the upper chamber – the Senate. This is the case every two years, major election or not. That’s a major chunk of our country’s decision makers, those with the power of the purse.

But if this election is about nothing, that’s a problem.

This year, as part of its new campaign to end hunger by 2030, Bread for the World wants to make hunger a prominent issue. With the Bread Rising campaign, Bread wants to make hunger an issue of the midterm elections and of the election two years from now, when we will elect a new president.

Hunger is certainly not a nothing issue. It’s a major something. It’s a big topic that deserves the attention of our nation’s top leaders, especially those who have the power of the purse.

The best way to make hunger an issue for potential members of Congress is for voters and other residents of districts and states to bring the issue of hunger to the attention of candidates. Hunger affects people from all walks of life – people living in poverty, people who are unemployed, immigrants, the elderly, children, single-parent-headed households, and working families. Candidates need to hear from and about people affected by hunger in their jurisdictions.

It’s up to us as activists to speak up. As Christians, we are called to speak out. “Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to do it,” says Proverbs 3:27. We have the power already in our democracy to raise concerns with our elected leaders, and an election is an ideal time to do that as candidates speak about their plans for being in office.

With your power as an activist and voice for hunger, Bread can further equip you with tools to speak up. Fact sheets about hunger in the United States and in the states with the highest percentage of people living in poverty and hunger are available.  Pair one of these with information about how your current member of Congress has voted in the past on hunger-related legislation in Bread’s Congressional Scorecard. If you need help getting started, check out Bread’s election materials.

But if we don't speak out - if we let apathy win the day - then the nothing-ness of this election will get in our way, and hunger in our world will persist. But if we speak up in a chorus of concern for what hunger is doing, then nothing can stop us!

Stephen Padre is the managing editor at Bread for the World.

World Prayers for Oct. 5-11: Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan

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Bread in Afghanistan. Photo by Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion from Wikimedia Commons

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of October 5-11, we pray for: Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan:

God of peace, we lift up these places, many of which are unfamiliar to us. You know the needs of these nations' peoples. We pray especially for peace and justice in Afghanistan, a country that has suffered under conflict and war for many years. We pray for an end to the suffering from war and the hunger it causes. May this country know peace and the see hunger cease. Protect all who serve in our armed forces there. Keep them safe and out of harm's way. And watch over their families back at home as they go about life with their loved ones far away. We lift up those providing humanitarian aid in Afghanistan and these other countries. Give them strength and support as they address poverty and other challenging conditions. All these things we ask in Jesus' name. Amen.

Percentage of the population of some of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Afghanistan: 35.8
Kazakhstan:
2.9
Kyrgyzstan:
38.0
Mongolia:
27.4
Uzbekistan:
16.0

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

Want Very High-Leverage Charity? Try Advocacy.

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The work that churches and charities do in directly feeding people is important, but they can't end hunger alone. The federal government needs to do its part. This is where advocates come in - pushing the government to play its role in ending hunger in our time - in what becomes "very high-leverage charity." Bread for the World photo

This is an excerpt from a sermon delivered by Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, at Christ Church in Alexandria, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C., on Sept. 21, 2014.

Churches and other concerns commissioned a recent report on hunger in Alexandria.  I read reports about hunger all the time, but this report on widespread hunger in my own community hit me in the gut.

This report shows that churches are the front line of food charity in Alexandria, and that Christ Church seems to be doing more than any other church in this area… 

But hunger in our city far outstrips what churches and charities can do.  Alexandria is one of the wealthiest jurisdictions in the country, but this report shows that about one in five people in Alexandria – 29,000 people – lives in families that are struggling to make ends meet… 

Most of the assistance that people do get comes from the national nutrition programs. Based on the report’s description of Alexandria’s charitable agencies, I’m guessing that they together provide food assistance to fewer than 4,000 people a month.  On the other hand, just one of the federal programs, SNAP (food stamps), benefits about 9,000 people in Alexandria every month.  And while SNAP doesn’t provide enough to pay for a family’s groceries, the benefits that people receive from charities are generally much more limited. 

The report argues that people Alexandria could have a big impact by making the national nutrition programs work better in our community…Signing people up for the programs would be high-leverage charity.

The report doesn’t talk about advocacy, but Congress cut SNAP last year.  The cut that went into effect last November has reduced SNAP benefits in Alexandria by about $700,000 a month.  That cut in groceries for low-income people in Alexandria is probably more than all the assistance that Alexandria charities provide.  The average benefit for Alexandria’s SNAP recipients dropped from $125 a month to $115 a month.  The benefit per meal dropped from $1.40 to about $1.30. 

The House of Representatives was pushing for much more drastic cuts in SNAP – roughly ten times the cut that went into effect in November.  Bread for the World members, including the high school youth group here at Christ Church, lobbied Congress to push back against SNAP…Advocacy is very high-leverage charity…

We don’t need to debate how guilty we should feel about the extent of hunger among our neighbors.  I think we should have some sense of guilt...[But] God’s gracious presence in our lives can budge us – move us – to share the love, also with people who struggle to put food on the table for their kids.

I am also convinced that God has made it possible in our time to make progress against hunger and poverty – maybe to virtually end hunger.  We know this because the number of people in extreme poverty in the world has been cut in half since 1990... 

The real possibility of ending hunger in our time is a great gift from God. It will take some effort from us, but the possibility is a miracle…And the chance to end hunger is now, in our generation, here in northern Virginia and all around the world.

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