Urging our nation's leaders to end hunger
 

25 posts categorized "Prayer"

World Prayers for Dec. 21-27: Ghana and Nigeria

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In Ghana, Feed the Future, the U.S. global hunger and food security initiative, has provided agricultural development assistance to this woman and other members of a women’s rice processing group. Louis Stippel/USAID.

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray more, act more, and give more. In this blog series, we will provide a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.

This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.

We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.

We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of December 21-27, we pray for Ghana and Nigeria:

Lord Christ, you reconciled us to yourself through sacrifice. We pray today for your followers in Ghana and Nigeria as they work for peace and reconciliation with their Muslim neighbors. Thank you for their faithfulness to the Gospel and their witness of your power to us. Continue to bless their work.

Almighty God, you have given us this world and charged us as its stewards. We pray for our brothers and sisters in these countries as they fight for a more just and equitable society. May it protect the rights of minority groups, provide needed healthcare, especially for those living with HIV/AIDS, and properly administrate natural resources. Give the leaders of both the church and the government wisdom in how to accomplish these tasks to your glory.

Advance your Kingdom through the Holy Spirit for your glory, so that all people might live peacefully in the saving knowledge of Christ. These things we pray in His name. Amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Ghana: Not available
Nigeria: 46.0

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the new 2015 Hunger Report

 

Transforming Fear Into Action

On-faithBy Rev. Ann Tiemeyer

God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.  Therefore we will not fear, ...

"Be still, and know that I am God! I am exalted among the nations, ..."   (From Psalm 46)

Fear can be paralyzing. Fear can paralyze a person, a city, a nation, and a global community. When Ebola appeared in the United States, fear seemed to spread at lighting speed through Dallas and across our nation to our "leaders" in D.C. Calls for canceling flights threatened to paralyze a positive global response. As Christians, when we see fear that points a finger and blames innocent people — people who are sick, people who offered help to those who are sick, people who are different from us — how can we respond? How do we keep from being paralyzed by the fear? One powerful response is prayer — to take our fears to God. Psalm 46 reminds us that "God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble."  

When I turned to prayer in the face of the U.S. Ebola fear, I found a deep sense of thanksgiving welled up my heart. I am thankful for the privilege of living in a country with a medical system that can, within two months and three days after the tragic death of Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas, give thanks for Dr. Craig Spencer's release from the hospital free of the Ebola virus. 

When I turned to prayer in the face of the global Ebola fear, my heart was filled with thoughts of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Laymah Gbowee, whose foundation — begun with her Nobel Prize funds — immediately activated grants to stem the spread of Ebola. In the midst of her advocacy work, Gbowee experienced the loss her father. On her Facebook page she reflected:

The last few weeks have been a roller coaster week for me. Beyond the Ebola nightmare, I lost my dad two weeks ago in Ghana. This has been a hard time for me; however, I think my dad taught me a very valuable lesson before leaving me. Every day for the last nine days of his life, I sang his favorite hymn "What a Friend We Have in Jesus." The song's chorus chides us to take all of life's trials and tribulations to the "Lord in prayer." There we will find comfort, and most importantly wisdom and knowledge when our human understanding fails us. Today, I think I understand why my dad had me sing this song to him. He was telling me to talk to God in every situation: Talk to God, ...

When we take our fears to God in prayer, the overwhelming recognition of God's love for all of us can transform our fear into thankfulness and our thankfulness into action and advocacy. 

So, as we gather with our families during this time of year, may we take time to be still and be in prayer. Let us utter out loud our fears. Fears such as our government continuing in deadlock, causing suffering for the poor, people who are un- and underemployed, hungry, undocumented, or incarcerated. As we transition from Thanksgiving to Advent, let us remember the biblical stories for this church season, how angels, sent from God, visited both Zechariah and Mary and told them, "Do not be afraid…"

We can carry into Advent our Thanksgiving gratefulness and prayers. Together in prayer, our fears will transform to thanksgiving — a thanksgiving for a loving God who is ultimately in charge. Thanksgiving for a God of love, forgiveness, empowerment, and life, who can move us to action and advocacy. Fear through prayer becomes thankfulness that can empower us to advocate for change that reflects God's love exalted among all nations.

Rev. Ann Tiemeyer (pictured), a pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), is the former Associate General Secretary for Joint Action and Advocacy of the National Council of Churches.

The Faithful Light the Way to Justice

Vigilpic
Church members from various faiths light the way to justice. Jay Mallin/United Methodist Board of Church and Society.

By Jennifer Gonzalez

Over the weekend, hundreds of people from various faiths stood on the sidewalk along 16th Street, a major thoroughfare in Washington, D.C., from the White House to Silver Spring, Md., in solidarity with those hurting from the recent slate of injustices perpetrated against the lives of African-American men.

“Vigil for Justice: People of Faith Lighting the Way” was organized by clergy from the Greater Washington, D.C., area as a way to respond in a peaceful manner to the recent police shootings of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice. Roughly 30 churches participated, including those from the Unitarian Universalist, Episcopal, United Church of Christ, United Methodist, and Baptist denominations.

Rev. Robert Hardies, senior minister at All Souls Church Unitarian, said faith traditions contain a promise that all human beings have inherent worth and dignity, but that the criminal justice system is not living up to that promise and that the vigil was “lighting the way to a more just society.”

The faithful held candles, flashlights, and even lanterns. Thousands of luminaries dotted the east side of 16th Street. Every now and then a chorus of “This Little Light of Mine” broke out, and candles were raised high when passing drivers honked their horns.

I was one of the many standing in the cold on Friday. I participated out of my conviction for the inherent worth and dignity of all human beings. What has happened in our country lately has been shameful. Rev. Ruben Tendai, interim senior minister at Lincoln Congregational Temple United Church of Christ in Washington, D.C., likened the current injustices to a festering wound that erupts from time to time in this country.

“Garner’s words, ‘I can’t breathe,’ is a metaphor for the marginalized people in our nation,” Tendai said. “We actually can’t breathe how God intended us to.”

Vigilpic3After the Ferguson grand jury decision, I figured the demonstrations would just peter out like they have so many times before. Instead, I have been heartened to see the protests continue.  Most recently, medical students organized a massive “die-in” protest across the country. Students from institutions such as Howard University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard University dropped to the ground in their white coats.

The hunger and poverty experienced by people of color is deeply rooted in the racial injustices they have experienced. Education, healthcare, housing, and employment opportunities grow dim when the lives of African-Americans don’t matter. That’s when programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly food stamps) can help families and individuals move out of poverty.

On Saturday, thousands descended on the National Mall to protest the police shootings and the larger issue of racial injustice. I don’t know what is going to happen next. But I am hopeful like I have never been before. As a person of faith, I have to believe that justice will prevail and that goodness will be done.

Bread for the World is ending the year with the theme of “Shine your light. Give life,” taken from John 8:12. My hope is that more lights like those that were on the streets of our nation’s capital on Friday night will pierce the darkness of injustice. It is only when we shine a light on injustice that life in its fullness can be lived by everybody.

Jennifer Gonzalez is the associate online editor at Bread for the World.

Inset photo: Luminaries light the sidewalk along 16th Street, near the border of Washington, D.C. and Silver Spring, Md. Jay Mallin/United Methodist Board of Church and Society.

World Prayers for Nov. 30-Dec. 6: Liberia and Sierra Leone

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A road in Sierra Leone. Derek Schwabe/Bread for the World

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.

This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.

We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.

We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of November 30 – December 6, we pray for Liberia and Sierra Leone:

O God, as we enter this season of Advent, we pray that you will always be our Emmanuel—God-with-us. Be God-with-us here in the United States, but we also pray that you will be God-with-others—our neighbors near and far, especially those we lift up this week to you in Liberia and Sierra Leone. We have seen great suffering of the people in these countries in recent months from the Ebola virus and suffering for years before that from civil war. Bring peace and healing to people who are broken in body, mind, or spirit from conflict, sickness, hunger, or other challenges. Sustain and strengthen health care workers, churches, and aid agencies that are working tirelessly to bring Ebola under control. Send your healing and comfort to families that have lost loved ones or who are ill. Provide for the food needs of everybody in these countries so that all may have health and the opportunity for an abundant life. We pray for a day in Liberia and Sierra Leone when all may have enough and live in peace. Keep us in the United States awake and aware of the needs of our brothers and sisters there and how our lives are linked with theirs. In the name of Emmanuel, amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Liberia: not available
Sierra Leone: 52.9

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the new 2015 Hunger Report

 

 

 

World Prayers for Nov. 23-29: Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger

Mauritania
A
 Mauritanian meal – lamb stuffed with rice; French-fried potatoes; bread; and dates with a cream cheese-like dip. It is eaten while seated on the floor. Stephen H. Padre/Bread for the World

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.

This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.

We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.

We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of November 23-29, we pray for Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger:

O God, your love is as deep as the ocean, and your mercies are greater than the sands of the desert. This week we lift up in prayer to you countries in West Africa by the ocean or desert. We pray for the peoples of these countries and the challenges they face—the ever-encroaching desert, political and economic instability, poverty, and others. Sustain the people in these places who struggle to get enough water and food in desert conditions. Bless the work of Christians and church-related organizations that work in these places, especially where Muslims are predominant. We pray for peace among people of different religions and ethnicities in these places. All these things we ask in Jesus’ name. Amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Burkina Faso: 46.7
Chad: 46.7
Mali: 43.6
Mauritania: 42.0 (2011)
Niger: Not available

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the new 2015 Hunger Report

 

 

 

We Pray for Justice in Ferguson

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(Bread for the World)

Bread for the World issued the following press release earlier today. 

Rev. David Beckmann, president of Bread for the World, issued this statement today as the country awaits the grand jury’s decision on the Michael Brown case. Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old African-American man, was fatally shot by Darren Wilson, a 28-year-old white police officer, on Aug. 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo. The grand jury is expected to render its decision to indict or not to indict Officer Wilson this month.

“Bread for the World holds the community of Ferguson, the City of St. Louis, the State of Missouri, and all in this nation in prayer. We pray for shalom, the peace of God thatconveys health, completeness, wholeness, integrity, soundness, welfare, security, reconciliation, prosperity, harmony, and justice.

We confess that we as a nation have allowed racial injustice and the circumstances like those in Ferguson and elsewhere throughout the country to persist. As we pray for forgiveness for ourselves and peace for Michael Brown’s family, we also pray for Darren Wilson, his family, and police officers.

“We support the young people and faith congregations in St. Louis who have vowed to solve these problems through non-violent means. They have sparked renewed interest in activism for a just society, where all can thrive, be respected, and be safe. Bread member and activist Mary Gene Boteler, pastor of Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis; Bread board member Dr. Iva Carruthers of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference; the St. Louis Metropolitan Clergy United; the Metropolitan Congregations United; and the Missouri-wide coalition Hands Up; Clergy United; the Don't Shoot Coalition; along with hundreds of courageous young people struggle to create a local resolution to this national problem and to recommend effective responses.

“We look forward to joining them and others during the Faith Table Gathering in Ferguson in early December to seek effective ways to hold public systems accountable and a unified, national, change agenda.

“Amid the soul searching that the death of Michael Brown revived, Bread recognizes that the legacy of slavery must be reconciled if we are to end hunger and poverty in the United States. Bread takes note that Missouri is the sixth-hungriest state in our nation. Nearly one million Missourians cannot adequately feed themselves or their families. This includes more than 308,000 children, many of whom rely on meals they get while at school.

“Bread also notes that the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world and incarcerates people of color at alarming rates with an expansion and militarization of police forces. These factors contribute to hunger and poverty in many communities. We are encouraged that members of Congress from both parties have spoken out about injustices in the legal system, and Bread for the World will support legislation to address these issues.

“Bread is committed to ending hunger and poverty by 2030 while addressing these injustices today, and it works with all people of good will to accomplish that goal. We pray that in the end, justice will ’roll down like waters and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream’ (Amos 5:24).”

 

 

World Prayers for Nov. 16-22: Cameroon, Central African Republic, and Equatorial Guinea

Cameroune
Fried shrimp - Cameroon style - and white rice. Photo by Coco lago from Wikimedia Commons

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of November 16-22, we pray for Cameroon, Central African Republic, and Equatorial Guinea:

Triune God, we pray for relief and for peace among our brothers and sisters in Central and West Africa. God, the world’s great powers turn a blind eye, yet you see your children in Central African Republic starving, unsafe, displaced, and cut off from vital resources. Influence global leaders to put a stake in ending the crisis of conflict, violence, and displacement in that country. Enable bold U.N., UNICEF, and other relief workers to reach the poorest and most vulnerable with vital supplies to sustain life. Lord, not only do we ask for peace and relief but also for shalom, a true flourishing among people oppressed by cycles of poverty, hunger, and violence in C.A.R., Equitorial Guinea, and Cameroon. We pray for an end to attacks of the Boko Haram in Cameroon and that the people may flourish. Lord, you have made these places rich with resources to sustain the people; in Equitorial Guinea, oil is abundant, yet people still suffer from hunger and poverty. Guide their leaders to make unselfish decisions over resources management, that the people may prosper and live well, to your glory, in Equitorial Guinea. Spirit, renew the minds and hearts of rebels, politicians, and all the people of your church in these places. We pray for shalom. Amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Cameroon: not available
Central African Republic:
62.0 (2011)
Equatorial Guinea:
not available

 Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

World Prayers for Nov. 9-15: Republic of Congo, Gabon, and Sao Tome and Principe

Churchgabon
Saint Michel of Nkembo Church, Libreville, Gabon. Photo by Vincent.vaquin from Wikimedia Commons

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of November 9-15, we pray for: Republic of Congo, Gabon, and Sao Tome and Principe:

God our creator, you created the Earth in all of its vastness. There are places that are often unknown to us but known to you, and there are needs that are unknown to us but known to you. This week we pray for far-away places from our home in the United States: Republic of Congo, Gabon, and Sao Tome and Principe.

We give thanks for Christians in these countries and people who are fighting the causes of hunger, such as HIV and AIDS and violence. We pray for an end of the suffering that hunger and these things cause. We lift up people who are involved in subsistence agriculture, that their crops may be plentiful and they have enough food to eat and clean water to drink. We pray that the leaders of these countries will use their power justly in service to all people and refrain from corrupt practices. And we pray for the just sharing of these countries’ natural resources, particularly oil, so that all the people may reap the benefits of what you have given and not just those in power or international corporations. All these things we ask in the name of Jesus, amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Republic of Congo: 46.5
Gabon:
not available
Sao Tome and Principe:
61.7

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

World Prayers for Nov. 2-8: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda

Rwanda
The Cooperative Des Agricultures De Cereales is a farmers cooperative in Rwanda that is using techniques to increase production, improve the quality of the harvest, and use land consolidation for selected crops. Their main crop is maize as it can be dried and stored with little product loss. Bread for the World Institute's 2015 Hunger Report will focus on women's empowerment and uses cases in Rwanda as examples. Bread for the World Institute photo

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of November 2-8, we pray for: Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda:

Almighty and benevolent God, with love you created us and bestowed upon us the dignity of sons and daughters. In your divine providence, you gave us the whole world and all its fullness for our support and preservation. But because of our human greed, millions continue to suffer from hunger and are deprived the opportunity to live a life of dignity. This week, we place under your care and protection the people of Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Rwanda. Touch the hearts of all of us to challenge global injustice—that your sons and daughters on the margins of society may claim their place at the table. In your most holy name we pray, amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

Burundi: not available
Democratic Republic of Congo:
not available
Rwanda:
44.9

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

World Prayers for Oct. 19-25: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka

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A farmer in India. Bread for the World photo

This is a weekly prayer series that appears each Friday on the Bread Blog.

One aspect of Bread for the World’s new Bread Rising campaign is prayer. The campaign is asking Bread members to pray, act, and give. In this blog series, we will be providing a prayer for a different group of countries each week and their efforts to end hunger.
 
This prayer series will follow the Ecumenical Prayer Cycle, a list compiled by the World Council of Churches that enables Christians around the world to journey in prayer through every region of the world, affirming our solidarity with Christians all over the world, brothers and sisters living in diverse situations, experiencing their challenges and sharing their gifts.
 
We will especially be lifting up in prayer the challenges related to hunger and poverty that the people of each week’s countries face. In prayer, God’s story and our own story connect—and we and the world are transformed. In a prayer common to all of us—the Lord’s Prayer/the Our Father—we pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” This line from this prayer can also be a prayer for the end of hunger.
 
We invite you to join Bread in our prayers for the world’s countries to end hunger. And we encourage you to share with us your prayers for the featured countries of the week or for the end of hunger in general.

For the week of October 19-25, we pray for: India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka:

Creator God, we lift to you this week the people of India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. We marvel at the rich diversity of cultures, faiths, histories, and people in these nations, bursting with vibrancy and life. We also lift to you the times when that diversity becomes the seedbed for resentment, conflict, and alienation. Bring peace, healing, and justice to the lives of all the people of these countries, especially those who suffer from the aftermath of wars, recurring climate disasters, human trafficking, and marginalization based on their ethnic identities. May these nations’ governments make human rights, an equitable stability, and reduction of violence priorities in their official actions.  

We raise up those who are displaced in these countries due to regional conflicts, in some of which our own nation has been involved. For all those people who are hungry and who live in grinding poverty, we ask for ways that we ourselves might be instruments of restoration and wholeness. We give thanks for the missionaries, health workers, educators, peacemakers, and others who continue to come alongside these nations’ people, offering hope and supporting opportunities for them to work for a better life for themselves and their families. In your holy and healing name we pray, Amen.

Percentage of the population of these countries living below the national poverty line (2014 figures):

India: 21.9
Pakistan:
12.4
Sri Lanka: 6.7

Source: World Bank World Development Indicators as found in the upcoming 2015 Hunger Report

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